Backstay: One good, two great? - SailNet Community

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Old 03-06-2010
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Backstay: One good, two great?

I am replacing the mast and rigging on a Pearson 26. With everything now coming together, my rigger asked me if I want to copy the old design of the Split Backstay or rig a Double Backstay?

The double backstay would reduce the number of terminals from 6 to 4, but it will also increase the weight of the backstay rigging. Are there any other pros & cons that I am missing? Any strong opinions either way?
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Two backstays or double backstays aren't really necessary on most boats. I'd go with the single backstay with the y-plate and two termination points on deck or a split backstay. Then you can add a backstay adjuster to the rig to help with sail shape control.

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Old 03-07-2010
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Good reasoning from Brion. Thanks for the link.

In answer to the poster's question, double backstays do seem like overkill. Added windage, added weight, and the forces involved aren't so big that dividing them between two stays would be necessary. Splitting the backstay is convenient if you access the boat via the transom. As suggested earlier, it also makes it easy to adjust backstay tension; it's the setup we have on our J/36. Having that much torquing power on a Pearson 26 might also be overkill however. It the mast is built like a telephone pole, cranking the backstay might simply work to push the it through the botttom of the boat while turning the hull into a banana. For the convenience of transom access, just make sure the opening is wide enough (and tall enough) to step through. If the transom isn't too wide, splitting the backstay might be more trouble than simply going past it on one side or the other. It sounds like the original setup (split) is the way to go. KISS.

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Quote:
Originally Posted by paulk View Post
..forces involved aren't so big that dividing them between two stays would be necessary. Splitting the backstay is convenient if you access the boat via the transom. ...
Access to the transom is the only reason I can see. If we need two back stays then I figure we need two forestays.
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