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irwin325cc 03-09-2010 10:45 PM

Rigging stupid question # ??I stoped counting
 
It doesn't seem right to me but I could still see it being no big deal. I was out in the bay last weekend and sailing in some of the stonger winds(averaged 18-20) that I've stayed out in with both sails up, due to setting up my main reefing system I could now reef down. I noticed alot of salck in the leeward stays. They were moving under there own power maybe up to an inch or two back and forth.

Is this normal as the windward side is taking all the strain or should they be tight also? I had a local rigging company come out last summer and remove my roller furling system and they installed a new forward stay for my new hankon sail. I asked them to look over all the other rigging and tell me if any of it needed replacing. They said everything checked out, but I question if they did check it as this is an older boat and I figured something else would or could use replacing in the near future.

O yes, the boats a '72 Irwin 32.5 Center Cockpit Sloop.

sailingdog 03-09-2010 11:10 PM

It might be normal, but I would highly recommend you check the tension on your rigging. The problem with having a lot of slack in the rigging is that will expose the mast and rigging to shock loading as the boat goes from one tack to the other.

scottyt 03-09-2010 11:12 PM

the leeward shrouds and stay normally are loose but not slack. meaning they should be loose but not loose enough to flop around.

but more important is to make sure the mast is straight when the sails are down.

DwayneSpeer 03-09-2010 11:12 PM

Common Occurrence
 
It's a common occurrence for the leeward stays to be loose under higher winds. If you are worried then have them adjusted by a professional rigger.

sailingfool 03-09-2010 11:39 PM

If the leeward shrouds flop around, tighten them until they are just a little slack. Tigthen each side a turn at a time, on alternaqte tacks, until you are set.

knothead 03-09-2010 11:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DwayneSpeer (Post 578862)
It's a common occurrence for the leeward stays to be loose under higher winds. If you are worried then have them adjusted by a professional rigger.

Do you seriously think that all professional riggers agree on how tight to set up a rig?

sailingdog 03-09-2010 11:55 PM

Ask a dozen riggers how a given boat should be rigged and you'll usually get fifteen or sixteen answers... :D

Quote:

Originally Posted by knothead (Post 578869)
Do you seriously think that all professional riggers agree on how tight to set up a rig?


Hunterdon31 03-10-2010 05:45 PM

I agree with sailingfool.
From everything I've read and people I talked with thats how you can rig it yourself. If you can find a day with a steady 10 kts wind that's the perfect time to adjust your tension. Just don't forget to lock the turnbuckles when your done. I did our boat that way when it arrived.

eMKay 03-10-2010 07:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sailingfool (Post 578867)
If the leeward shrouds flop around, tighten them until they are just a little slack. Tigthen each side a turn at a time, on alternaqte tacks, until you are set.

^^^^ DO NOT DO THIS ^^^^

Always tension the rig when it is static. Your owners manual should have the proper technique in it.

irwin325cc 03-10-2010 09:46 PM

Owners manual, ha. I have looked at the online version and it seems more of a brochure. I bet that the Hunters manuel does make a point about it as most Hunters don't have back stays I believe. I am not against having another rigging company come out and do it right, but that will be come summer when my paycheck gets a bit more plump. I am considering doing it the way Sailingfool recomended for the time being as I plan to replace the back stay and possibly the port and starboard stays.

Anyone else think that sf's way is not a good idea and possiblly why and or why not to do it one way or another. Also what type of tools do riggers use? I was guessing it was probablly like a torque style wrinch.


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