What wood - SailNet Community

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Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest Forums > Gear & Maintenance
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  #1  
Old 03-14-2010
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What wood

I have never done wood work on a boat. I am starting with one easy project followed by a second slightly more involved one. Depending on how these go I need to tackle a third. Ultimatley my question is what wood to use for each?

Project #1:
easy one - I want to afix a wood mounting plate on the stern rail that I can then screw my BBQ mount to it. Without getting into the why, I need a wooden surface on the rail to tie into. I have a similar vertical wood surface mounted on the stern rail for the dingy motor. What wood do you recommend?
Project #2: after some professional deck surgery I have to replace some shelving in the main salon that is rotted. This is more cosmetic I realize and I would like to be able to afford teak but... I don't even think the original wood was even teak? I will need to match the stain colour as well. I realize the existing wood type would be perfect but I don't know what was used.

Project #3: combo of the first two jobs. This one has the need to survive elements AND look good. I need to replace the wood that houses the instruments in the cockpit. The piece (I broke while winterizing) is attached to the wheel.

Thanks for the suggestions. As I said, would love to use teak but that is neither economical or accessible for me. I have experience and tools for wood working... Just not on a boat.

Al
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Old 03-14-2010
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I have used Ipe “epay” for a few projects. I had scraps from a decking job. The stuff is hard as a rock so buy extra bits. Lots of info on line. Dan S/V Marian Claire
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Old 03-14-2010
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Ipe, or Ironwood is amazingly hard and durable stuff. It is usually used for exterior decking for houses as it, like teak, stands up well to the elements. Ipe also looks a bit like teak. As Dan suggests, because of its hardness you will need extra blades and bits when working with it.
Another good choice would be Mahogany.
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Old 03-14-2010
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I second mahogany- it is easy to work with, finishes nicely, and is relatively durable. if you want to make it damn near bulletproof, coat it with a coat or two of epoxy prior to finishing with paint or varnish.
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Old 03-14-2010
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Your interior wood is most likely teak. When I was building interiors for Columbia we used teak faced plywood and solid teak only. That was for the B.C. built Columbias, though it was 40 years ago.
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Old 03-14-2010
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Brian,
That would make sense - the teak/plywood combo. My marine wood knowledge is zero and I was not aware that teak skinned plywood was out there. When I removed the piece that boxed out the port deck scupper I saw plywood. I suspect that materal will not be easy to find at my local lumber yard!! The pieces I will be replacIng will be the same make up.
I'm liking mahogony gor the exterior work. By the way, nice work, I love our Columbia.
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I don't think I had anything to do with yours. The Columbia 26 and 34 were built under license by Cooper in N. Vancouver and I worked for a company that was contracted to do the woodwork. 95% of the wood we used was teak or teak faced ply and the other 5% was for other customers - not boats.
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Old 03-14-2010
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Where does one "normally" purchase these types of exotic woods? I assume Lowes and Home Depot will be a little short on them...
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I'm not sure where you are located but one example is Exotic Woods in Burlington Ontario. Most large areas have hardwood suppliers.
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boony, are you sailing out of the east end of lake ontario or the west? If you're in the west, stop into a Turkstra Lumber yard. They stock mahogany in a variety of thicknesses and board widths. I bought some reaaly nice 1x4" for a davit project I am working on, for $1.27/ft.
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