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sailjunkie 03-14-2010 11:09 PM

Anchor Rode Length
 
Today, we finally got a chance to examine our anchor and rode, for our recently purchased Mirage 29'. The anchor is a 22lb. CQR-style, with about 37' of chain. There is just under 200' of rode.

To me, that doesn't seem like very rode. For almost 14 years, we belonged to a sailing co-op that operated C27's. We used 14lb Danforths (you knew they were real--they were heavy and VERY rusted! :) and about 275' rode and 25' of chain. Perhaps that's why I'm scratching my head.

I'm just wondering what some of the wiser "heads" on this forum think of that chain/rode combination? We are looking at buying a second anchor and rode, then using this as backup.

Thx in advance!

jackdale 03-14-2010 11:36 PM

For west coast sailing:

At 2 boat lengths of chain and total of 300 feet of rode.

Think Montague Harbour in a blow, it is about 40 feet deep. This will give a bare 7:1.

If you had a windlass and a heavier boat, I would recommend 200 feet of chain, but that is not feasible.

tager 03-15-2010 12:32 AM

It doesn't hurt to have a lot of rope. 300 feet of 5/8 rope is only 40lbs or less.

sailingdog 03-15-2010 03:13 AM

Without more information, like what kind of chain it is, what diameter rope it is, it is hard to say whether it is sufficient for your boat.
Quote:

Originally Posted by sailjunkie (Post 580850)
Today, we finally got a chance to examine our anchor and rode, for our recently purchased Mirage 29'. The anchor is a 22lb. CQR-style, with about 37' of chain. There is just under 200' of rode.

For the PNW, this is really a bit on the short side, regardless of any other considerations. I'd also think that the anchor is a bit undersized as well.

Quote:

To me, that doesn't seem like very rode. For almost 14 years, we belonged to a sailing co-op that operated C27's. We used 14lb Danforths (you knew they were real--they were heavy and VERY rusted! :) and about 275' rode and 25' of chain. Perhaps that's why I'm scratching my head.
This is a curious statement, since a 14 lb. Danforth, is just that...14 lbs. That is a fairly light and insubstantial anchor only worthy as a lunch hook on most boats. The Delta 22 is a far more substantial anchor than what you're "used" to.

Quote:

I'm just wondering what some of the wiser "heads" on this forum think of that chain/rode combination? We are looking at buying a second anchor and rode, then using this as backup.

Thx in advance!
If I were you, I would get a next gen anchor in the 30+ lb. range—either a Rocna 15 or a Manson Supreme 35. Add a 3/8" Crosby load-rated bow anchor shackle, 30' or preferably 60' of 5/16" G43 high-test chain, and at least 250' of 5/8" megaplait nylon...and you'll have a pretty decent anchor rode.

280' of anchor rode will allow you to anchor in 30' of water at 7:1 scope rather easily. A bit longer nylon rope might be a good choice, given the average depths of the anchorages out where you are. Going up to 350' or so of rope would give you 380-400' of rode, which would allow you to anchor in 40' of water at 8:1 fairly easily.

DwayneSpeer 03-15-2010 08:25 PM

rode
 
200 feet of rode is adequate if you aren't going to stray far from home, but it does limit the places you can put the hook down. I think the Dog's advice is well placed.

Livia 03-18-2010 01:45 PM

We have 120' of chain connected to 150' of rope and in the Gulf Islands we find that we are most often on the first 120' of chain only both because of nice depths and swing room limitations BUT if we only had that we would be limited in ways we aren't comfortable with. Knowing that we can go to deeper anchorages when the popular shallower ones are full, or that we can let out a lot more additional scope is nice.

Still, I think that you could probably cruise in the islands on 200' for a while (watching your depths) and then decide later whether to upgrade and how much depending on where you go.

sailjunkie 03-18-2010 03:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Livia (Post 582334)
We have 120' of chain connected to 150' of rope and in the Gulf Islands we find that we are most often on the first 120' of chain only both because of nice depths and swing room limitations ....
Still, I think that you could probably cruise in the islands on 200' for a while (watching your depths) and then decide later whether to upgrade and how much depending on where you go.

Your rode/chain combination is very impressive, but I would probably have a heart attack trying to lift that much chain. I'm not even sure if my little manual windlass could handle it. :eek:

Your reply, plus the other replies, confirm my hunch that 200' of rode is not enough. I'll be looking at least 275' plus chain. Funny enough, the chain that came with our current rode is thicker than anything I have used before.

Livia 03-19-2010 02:55 PM

We are definitely using our manual windlass to hoist that! I wouldn't think you would need as much chain around here as we have and could use more rope. I was mostly commenting on length.

Waltthesalt 03-19-2010 08:48 PM

If you want a technical reference the most difinative that I know of is "The Complete Book of Anchoring and Mooring" by Earl Hinz.

In the Pacific Nortwest we have deeper water. I carry two separate rodes and anchors in the bow. On starboard is a 350 ft rode made of 1/2” line with 37 ft. of ¼”chain and a swivel. On the port is a 250 ft. rode of 1/2” braded line and 18 ft. of 3/8” chain. The strength of the latter rode is about 40% greater than the former. Both rode arrangements meet the manufacture’s recommendations for both my Bruce and Fortress anchors. A spring loaded link on each rode allows anchors to be switched between rodes. The Fortress is normally attached to the 350 ft. rode with the Bruce is normally attached to the 250 ft rode. The 250’ rode is the normal working rode for anchoring in waters about 30 ft. and for higher winds when the full holding power of the Fortress may be reached. The longer rode allows anchoring in waters up to 50 ft. and up to to 70 ft. with the killett*. For deeper waters the rodes can be attached end to end.

Each rode is in its own line locker in the forepeak with separate hawsepipes. As the original chain locker was large I divided it into two with lift out panels in the chain locker.

*I use a 20# downrigger ball and 80 ft of floating line serves as a killet or sentinel. The ball is attached to the anchor line with a bronze device called a “rode rider” and is lowered down rode. The killett increases the anchor’s holding power heavy weather; allows anchoring with short anchor rode scopes; helps keep the anchor line from being run over and reduces jerky motion with surging conditions. The normal practice is to lower it ½ way down the length of the rode.

sailingdog 03-19-2010 09:11 PM

While Hinz's book is fairly good, it is a bit dated and would benefit a lot from a revision. BTW, the rodes you describe sound quite a bit weaker than what I'd recommend. What size boat are you anchoring with a 1/2 nylon rode.
Quote:

Originally Posted by Waltthesalt (Post 582865)
If you want a technical reference the most difinative that I know of is "The Complete Book of Anchoring and Mooring" by Earl Hinz.

In the Pacific Nortwest we have deeper water. I carry two separate rodes and anchors in the bow. On starboard is a 350 ft rode made of 1/2” line with 37 ft. of ¼”chain and a swivel. On the port is a 250 ft. rode of 1/2” braded line and 18 ft. of 3/8” chain. The strength of the latter rode is about 40% greater than the former. Both rode arrangements meet the manufacture’s recommendations for both my Bruce and Fortress anchors. A spring loaded link on each rode allows anchors to be switched between rodes. The Fortress is normally attached to the 350 ft. rode with the Bruce is normally attached to the 250 ft rode. The 250’ rode is the normal working rode for anchoring in waters about 30 ft. and for higher winds when the full holding power of the Fortress may be reached. The longer rode allows anchoring in waters up to 50 ft. and up to to 70 ft. with the killett*. For deeper waters the rodes can be attached end to end.

Each rode is in its own line locker in the forepeak with separate hawsepipes. As the original chain locker was large I divided it into two with lift out panels in the chain locker.

*I use a 20# downrigger ball and 80 ft of floating line serves as a killet or sentinel. The ball is attached to the anchor line with a bronze device called a “rode rider” and is lowered down rode. The killett increases the anchor’s holding power heavy weather; allows anchoring with short anchor rode scopes; helps keep the anchor line from being run over and reduces jerky motion with surging conditions. The normal practice is to lower it ½ way down the length of the rode.



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