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post #21 of 31 Old 04-02-2010
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Check a local kitchen remodler for a scrap of Corian to replace the lid to your fridge. They always have the cutouts from the sinks.
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post #22 of 31 Old 04-02-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by timangiel View Post
can you glue a new piece of formica directly ontop of an existing formica top, or does the old piece need to be removed?
I've done it both ways.. definitely better results if you remove the old (all of it!)

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post #23 of 31 Old 04-02-2010
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Scratch it up a bunch so the glue has something to adhere to, should be just fine.
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post #24 of 31 Old 04-02-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by timangiel View Post
can you glue a new piece of formica directly ontop of an existing formica top, or does the old piece need to be removed?
If you plan to try and do this while the counter top is still in place you had better be real good at measuring and realize that once the two pieces touch they are not coming apart without possible damage.

The better way to do this is to remove the counter top from the boat and then cut the formica over size and then use a router to trim all the edges.

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post #25 of 31 Old 04-02-2010
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I couldn't agree more with that assessment! +1 for Freesail99's suggestion.
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post #26 of 31 Old 04-02-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pub911 View Post
Where can you buy a small piece of Corian? I just want to replace the lid to my fridge - I don't care if it matches exactly.
find a corian shop and go buy a piece, just tell them its for cutting board, table, shower etc as they cant sell it to you if you say its for a counter

or some higher end kitchen shops will sell it for cutting board use

one warning its only 1/2 inch thick
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post #27 of 31 Old 04-02-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scottyt View Post
one warning its only 1/2 inch thick
And this is why it is often less trouble to replace a laminate surface with another laminate. Unless you're going to rip out the old countertop and build a new one, replacing 1/32" Formica with 1/2" Corian can lead to some very challenging carpentry chores.

If there are any fiddles along the edge of the counter top (or a pull-up refer lid), then you've got additional carptentry work to do before that Corian goes down. Even getting the sink back in could mean you'll need to replumb the drain system.
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post #28 of 31 Old 04-05-2010
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You can sometimes buy solid surface (Corian, Swanstone, Pionite, etc) in widths 18" or less. You can't buy wider unless you are a certified fabricator. You CAN buy Ecotop, Paperstone, or a few other niche solid surface materials. I work with those all the time. Be aware that ANY solid surface material is going to be heavy and miserable to work with. Corian and similar thin materials need built-up edges or strict observance to cutout radius and setbacks, or cracks will propagate.

If using plastic laminate where moisture may be an issue, like on a sailboat, it is considered good form to laminate both faces of the substrate. Industrial particle board is the usual substrate; not sure how good that is on a boat. At the very least, I would advise varnishing or painting the underside of the particle board. I always do that near sinks or dishwashers.

Finally, consider Dog's suggestion of Starboard -- aka HDPE or UHMW (polyethylene). It's the familiar cutting board material, and it can be used directly as a cutting board. (Still want a separate cutting board for meats, and possibly another for garlic/onions.) It's not fabulous to look at, but it has a lot going for it:

-- Easy to cut, shape, and install.
-- VERY hard to damage. Doesn't split, crack, or chip.
-- Inexpensive and available in small or large pieces.
-- Dead waterproof. Reasonable weight.

Downsides: not all that heat resistant. Boring white. Can't really be glued, and you need to be smart with your fasteners. Cheers!

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post #29 of 31 Old 04-05-2010
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Be aware they do make starboard in several colors.

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post #30 of 31 Old 04-05-2010
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I have wood in the galley - solid teak - and marble in the head. Both are fine and look nice and both have stainless sinks. One thing that I really like about the corian I have seen on boats, or anywhere for that matter, is the integrated sink. Nice touch. One less place for water to inevitably find.
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