Bedding Deck Hardware With Butyl Tape - Page 24 - SailNet Community
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post #231 of 398 Old 12-09-2012
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Re: Bedding Deck Hardware With Butyl Tape

I bought two rolls from Maine, gave one to my boss who sails a leaky Cal 27-7 and am about 2/3 through my roll.

Here are pics of my plexiglass replacements. The biggest challenges were getting the old ones off, removing the caulk and glue that stayed behind and then removing duct tape residue. I was getting the plexi for free so I could not complain about the 3 month delay however I had to temporarily (3 months) cover the window openings with plastic held in place with duct tape. During Toronto's hottest summer ever that duct tape, under a green tarp, was baked into the deck. Come late Oct I froze my fingers getting that duct tape residue off with Goo Gone and acetone....but in the end all worked out. I will give the screws another turn or two come warmer weather.

This qualifies for cheap projects as it only cost me the $50+ US into Maine's bank account but I wanted to post it with the butyl tape because it was so easy to work with. I have also used the tape to seal one of my stanchions where a little "side arm" support stuck through the cabin side and I will do two more in the spring.

Thanks Maine.

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post #232 of 398 Old 03-04-2013
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I've been using electrical self-amalgamating tape (butyl tape) with good results to seal deck fittings. It is very thin so you need to be a bit creative when applying it, but it works well.
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post #233 of 398 Old 03-05-2013
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Re: Bedding Deck Hardware With Butyl Tape

Just ordered three rolls, thanks RC!

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post #234 of 398 Old 03-05-2013 Thread Starter
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Re: Bedding Deck Hardware With Butyl Tape

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Originally Posted by ODay e-pod View Post
Just ordered three rolls, thanks RC!
Always glad when I can help.

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post #235 of 398 Old 03-07-2013
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Re: Bedding Deck Hardware With Butyl Tape

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I've been using electrical self-amalgamating tape (butyl tape) with good results to seal deck fittings. It is very thin so you need to be a bit creative when applying it, but it works well.

Wha????? Electrical tape is not self amalgamating, and self amalgamating tape (rescue tape / rigging tape) is not Butyl rubber/tape. So color me confused cuz I have no idea what you mean?
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post #236 of 398 Old 03-07-2013
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Quote:
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Wha????? Electrical tape is not self amalgamating, and self amalgamating tape (rescue tape / rigging tape) is not Butyl rubber/tape. So color me confused cuz I have no idea what you mean?
In that case you're obviously not an electrician :-)
Try googling self-amalgamating tape, which is butyl tape we use in the electrical industry to re-insulate stuff. PVC electrical tape is what you are thinking of.
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post #237 of 398 Old 03-07-2013
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Re: Bedding Deck Hardware With Butyl Tape

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In that case you're obviously not an electrician :-)
Try googling self-amalgamating tape, which is butyl tape we use in the electrical industry to re-insulate stuff. PVC electrical tape is what you are thinking of.
This is of interest to me because I just starting purchasing this stuff at home and at work. My understanding is consistent with xymotic. Self-amalgamating tape (self fusing) is called EPR or Ethylene Propylene Rubber which has no relation to butyl from what I can tell.

See 3M :
Self Amalgamating Tape : 3M UK & Ireland
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post #238 of 398 Old 03-07-2013
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This is of interest to me because I just starting purchasing this stuff at home and at work. My understanding is consistent with xymotic. Self-amalgamating tape (self fusing) is called EPR or Ethylene Propylene Rubber which has no relation to butyl from what I can tell.

See 3M :
Self Amalgamating Tape : 3M UK & Ireland
Try googling 'butyl self-amalgamating tape'.
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post #239 of 398 Old 03-07-2013 Thread Starter
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Re: Bedding Deck Hardware With Butyl Tape

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Try googling 'butyl self-amalgamating tape'.

There are literally hundreds of products out there that use the term "butyl" in their description. Not all formulations of butyl, of which there are literally tons, are suitable for this application. Companies add fillers, solvents and other ingredients to get the formulation they want at the price they desire.

Most "butyl" self-amalgamating tapes are a mixture of butyl rubber and other rubber products such as EPM. If it has worked okay for you that is great, but having tested over 45 different manufacturers (not products but manufacturers) of "butyl" products I have found very, very few that are suitable.

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post #240 of 398 Old 03-07-2013
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The first deck fittings I used the particular tape I'm using on were done nearly 2 years ago and so far no problems. I was worried that the tape might leave a stain behind but that doesn't seem to be a problem either.
I guess the properties that make the tape good for electrical use in that the tape is likely to be exposed to the weather and must keep water out, also make it good for sealing deck fittings.

Here is a description of the particular type of tape I'm using...



NITTO no. 15 self-fusing butyl tape

Nitto no. 15 is a self-fusing butyl-based tape that does not require a liner, thereby reducing the time required to apply the tape during assembly. The tape has extremely good electrical properties, superior weatherability and resistance to water. Established areas of application include: corrosion protection of wires and cables on through connections and branch couplings, insulation of high-voltage cables, sealing cable heads, repairing cable sheaths, corrosion protection of pipes, pipe connections and installations, as filler material to compensate for unevenness.

-55C to +105C
Excellent workability due to linerless system
Exceptional electrical properties
Extremely resistant to moisture, water and chemicals
Superior weatherability and ozone resistance
Self-amalgamates within 12 hours when stretched at 100 - 150%
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