Quick splice to add three feet of line? - SailNet Community

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  #1  
Old 04-11-2010
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Quick splice to add three feet of line?

I want to run my main and jib halyards back to the cockpit to make single handing easier; right now they are both cleated on the mast. The jib halyard is no problem, but the main's is about two feet short of reaching the cockpit.

Is there any kind of joining besides a splice that can attach an extra two or three feet of 5/8" double braid to the end of the existing line? Obviously there's not going to be much strain lifting the mainsail that first three feet until I'm no longer hauling on the attached piece, and it won't even be going through a block. The other factor is that I don't want to remove the halyard from the boat to perform the "splice."

Any ideas?
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Old 04-12-2010
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Do these extra 3 feet of line need to go through any blocks or sheaves? If they do, then a splice is your only option.

You can do a modified end-for-end splice on just the core instead of on both layers, but that would reduce strength to 50%. It doesn't take that much longer to do a correct end-for-end splice, e.g. http://www.samsonrope.com/get.php?file=149 .
Another option might be to get a couple of feet of high-tech 12 strand single braid that is much thinner and then do a quick and simple moebius splice with the inner core of the existing line and then do several stitch-through whippings on the end of the existing halyrd to bind inner and outer cores together. Not as good as a real splice, but load bearing.
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Old 04-12-2010
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No, the only real function of the extra three feet would be to reach the cockpit. It would not pass through any blocks or sheaves, and at most it would only be under load to lift the mainsail the first three feet, then the splice would be in the coil of halyard laying in the bottom of the cockpit as the main was raised the rest of the way.

In all seriousness I could probably just tie a knot to get the extra length, but I was looking for something a little tidier.
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Old 04-12-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jaschrumpf View Post
No, the only real function of the extra three feet would be to reach the cockpit. It would not pass through any blocks or sheaves, and at most it would only be under load to lift the mainsail the first three feet, then the splice would be in the coil of halyard laying in the bottom of the cockpit as the main was raised the rest of the way.

In all seriousness I could probably just tie a knot to get the extra length, but I was looking for something a little tidier.
How do you plan on routing the longer halyard back to your cockpit? You don't have turning blocks at the base of your mast? No deck organizers? No clutch? No winch to adjust tension?

Do a core to core splice w/ a piece of single braid, bury the cover into the single braid, only go one size smaller than the current diameter.

1. tie a slip knot about 6' from the end of your halyard.
2. pull the core out through the side of the cover about 12" from the end.
3. Milk the cover back cut the existing core back about a foot.
4. put the core from the old halyard into the new halyard about 8-10" from the end of the new halyard.
5. Now put the 8-10" of the new halyard core into the core of the old halyard.
6. lock stitch the cores together.
7. milk the cover over your core-core splice. Use gloves, this will take some 'Jesus' strength.
8. you should still have 12" of cover flapping around. Bury the cover into the new core father than you think it will go, then pull it out of the side of the new core.
9. tapper the cover, then milk the new core over the tappered cover. Lock stitch and admire.

Just a modified core to core with the common practice of stripping sheets and halyards. http://www.neropes.com/SPL_DoubleHitechTaper.aspx
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Old 04-12-2010
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I'd just tie a knot in that case.

1. Put a double figure 8 or butterfly knot about 2 meters back onto the doublebraid to keep core and outer cover together.
2. Pull out as much of the inner core as you can.
3. Do a modifed Brummel or Moebius splice on the two ends about 15 diameters in. This means one gets thread through the other, then the other gets threaded into the original; thus interlocking each other. Then taper the ends and pull them into the other's center. There are lots of videos on how to do this; it shouldn't take more than 15 minutes for this part.
4. Milk the cover back over the core
5. Lock stitch the cover to the core
6. Do a whipping where the single and double core lines meet up.

This shouldn't take too long to do and you only need a long needle and whipping twine for tools to do this.


Addendum - I posted this before seeing zz4gta's post. Sorry for the duplication. My description is to add simple 12-strand single core, but his is better for adding doublebraid.
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Old 04-12-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zz4gta View Post
How do you plan on routing the longer halyard back to your cockpit? You don't have turning blocks at the base of your mast? No deck organizers? No clutch? No winch to adjust tension?

Do a core to core splice w/ a piece of single braid, bury the cover into the single braid, only go one size smaller than the current diameter.

1. tie a slip knot about 6' from the end of your halyard.
2. pull the core out through the side of the cover about 12" from the end.
3. Milk the cover back cut the existing core back about a foot.
4. put the core from the old halyard into the new halyard about 8-10" from the end of the new halyard.
5. Now put the 8-10" of the new halyard core into the core of the old halyard.
6. lock stitch the cores together.
7. milk the cover over your core-core splice. Use gloves, this will take some 'Jesus' strength.
8. you should still have 12" of cover flapping around. Bury the cover into the new core father than you think it will go, then pull it out of the side of the new core.
9. tapper the cover, then milk the new core over the tappered cover. Lock stitch and admire.

Just a modified core to core with the common practice of stripping sheets and halyards. New England Ropes - Splicing Guide
There seems to be a bit of confusion as to what the situation is now with the short halyard. The halyard already goes through the turning blocks at the base of the mast and through the deck organizer. It is merely two feet short -- with the mainsail all the way down -- of reaching the the cam cleat (not a line clutch) and the winch. The part with the splice would already be past all of the hardware in the path to the cockpit.

I don't completely follow your or Zanshin's instructions, as I don't know what a Moebius or Brummel splice is, nor do I know how to put a core into a core. Is the "SPL_DoubleHitechTaper.aspx" link to a video, or more detailed instructions? I don't know the first thing about splicing line.

Thanks for all your advice!
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Old 04-12-2010
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Tie a square knot! If all you need is the extra 3' to get it to the cockpit, a square knot will handle what little load you have for the one or two pulls getting the main up. Or for that matter, do a sheet bend, ie modified square knot for tying two different sized lines together and go with a smaller lighter line that is handy below deck. I do not know of one of us that does not have a few short lines in the boat for various and sundry reasons, from good to bad!

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Ok, then this line, short as it already is, is not the place to learn splicing. Use a knot - either a square knot or a sheet bend (http://www.sailingusa.info/sailing_knots.htm).
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Old 04-12-2010
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For this purpose, I wouldn't use a square knot or sheet bend, as either are fairly easily undone. I'd recommend going with a fisherman's knot...

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Old 04-12-2010
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Knots, I can do -- I remember most of mine from my Boy Scout days, though I don't remember a fisherman's knot (maybe because my troop didn't fish?).

From the diagram, it essentially looks like two overhand knots at 180 deg. from each other and pulled tight. Is that all it is?

[practices a moment with piece of line]

Neat! I'll give that one a go. Thanks!
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