Best teak treatment.... - SailNet Community
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post #1 of 34 Old 04-13-2010 Thread Starter
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Best teak treatment....

I was looking to see what people feel about the best thing to do with refinished teak. I have it sanded down to bare wood. This is a general question but the parts inquiring about are hatch covers, so exterior and some get walked on.
I was going to use cetal natural teak just to protect it and make it easy to clean.
Any suggestions comments?
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post #2 of 34 Old 04-13-2010
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use Cetol on NOTHING you want to stand on, unless you have a rubberized azz.

You're going to get 47 opinions on what finish to use, then 59 opinions on how to apply each of those finishes.

For teak you're going to stand on, its my opinion to use teak oil liberally. Or, nothing at all. it'll wear to a light gray patina. (less the dirt and gunk)

For reflective, mirror, looking up the dress shine, there are a myriad of finishes that will work. (including Cetol)

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post #3 of 34 Old 04-13-2010 Thread Starter
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Would it be better to just use a double boiled linseed oil?
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post #4 of 34 Old 04-13-2010
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Having been a professional finisher for 30+ years I have a very personal "professional" approach to the teak on my boat. I apply NO FINISH to any exterior teak on my boat. Teak is a wonderful wood. I like its silver appearance when it is weathered. Each spring I spray it with a 50% Clorox solution. I let the teak be teak and enjoy it. Other people's boats are a different story. I have earned many dollars flowing a mirror finish on beautiful teak. It does look spectacular! My interior is bright finished satin and that is enough for my taste. If you have all the old coating cleaned off this is your chance to end the varnish cycle and do something else with that time and money. Try it for a year. You can always "varnish" it next year if natural weathered teak doesn't work for you. As far as a surface to walk on, unfinished teak is a very good surface.

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post #5 of 34 Old 04-13-2010 Thread Starter
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So what is your 50% clorox solution, the other part water I assume. What does it do? Just for cleaning? I think your right about leaving it be. What about wiping it with these teak oils or linseed oil?
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post #6 of 34 Old 04-13-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by downeast450 View Post
Having been a professional finisher for 30+ years I have a very personal "professional" approach to the teak on my boat. I apply NO FINISH to any exterior teak on my boat. Teak is a wonderful wood. I like its silver appearance when it is weathered. Each spring I spray it with a 50% Clorox solution. I let the teak be teak and enjoy it. Other people's boats are a different story. I have earned many dollars flowing a mirror finish on beautiful teak. It does look spectacular! My interior is bright finished satin and that is enough for my taste. If you have all the old coating cleaned off this is your chance to end the varnish cycle and do something else with that time and money. Try it for a year. You can always "varnish" it next year if natural weathered teak doesn't work for you. As far as a surface to walk on, unfinished teak is a very good surface.

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I am interested in this as well. My entire cockpit deck grate and benches are entirely teak, not to mention numerous other handles and trim throughout the boat. Leaving it plain and simple appeals to me because of the amount of teak oil/finish i would have to apply. This is my first season with my own boat ever, so maybe I will give it a go and see how I like it. My girlfriend may want the shine though!

I am also interested in why you use the chlorox solution. is it just for cleaning?
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post #7 of 34 Old 04-13-2010
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Another option is to use a product called Teak Guard. It leaves the teak with that honey gold look, isn't slippery, doesn't turn black like teak oil does and is easy to maintain. Goes on easily with a foam brush. Cleans off the gel coat with just a damp rag so no need to tape or worry about stains. Note you should clean up any spills or streaks as soon as possible since it can be more difficult to remove once it dries. I've been using it for several years and love it. Plus get a lot of compliments on the teak.
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post #8 of 34 Old 04-13-2010
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LOL...tell us how you really feel....

Quote:
Originally Posted by cardiacpaul View Post
use Cetol on NOTHING you want to stand on, unless you have a rubberized azz.

You're going to get 47 opinions on what finish to use, then 59 opinions on how to apply each of those finishes.

For teak you're going to stand on, its my opinion to use teak oil liberally. Or, nothing at all. it'll wear to a light gray patina. (less the dirt and gunk)

For reflective, mirror, looking up the dress shine, there are a myriad of finishes that will work. (including Cetol)

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post #9 of 34 Old 04-13-2010
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I use Clorox, which I mix with water about 50%. I just spray it on and usually rinse it off with water after it has had its chance to clean things up. There is nothing magic about that percentage. It just seemed like it would work and it does. If you miss a spot it shows up and you just spray it again. It is really that simple. It just bleaches the wood to a uniform color. It is very bleached and new looking at first and gradually silvers. It should involve appropriate cautions. Don't spray into the wind unless the clothes you are wearing are an art project and keep it out of your eyes. No more sanding, masking, 5 coats of varnish, worry about dings, etc. It looks good, too. I did build a second set of drop boards for winter or during boat work so the potential damage I represent when working on the boat doesn't damage my beautiful silver boards. I still chuckle as I work my way around the boat spraying bleach from the dinghy to clean up the teak cleat pads instead of what most others spend time doing. I do this after launch. This time of year is for canoeing, trout fishing and a little late winter skiing.

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post #10 of 34 Old 04-13-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frozensurfer View Post
...I was going to use cetal natural teak just to protect it and make it easy to clean.
Any suggestions comments?
I second your intuition. If the teak is brightwork (teak handholds, cap rail, hatch frames, etc) use Cetol. It is easy to apply, and very resistant to the elements - UV, saltwater, abrasion, etc. It can produce a very nice look for the brightwork - not varnish spectacular, but a good, lazy man's alternative.

I have had Cetol on the handholds and cap-rails for 8-seasons now, with an annual light sanding and reapplication of 2-coats of Cetol Gloss (un-pigmented). This year I am taking it down to bare wood and have coated it with 3-coats of Cetol Light and will finish with 2-coats of Cetol Gloss. I expect another 8-seasons out of that with annual updates.

http://www.yachtpaint.com/usa/hotlin...kens_guide.pdf

I urge you not to use the linseed oil. It will build up to a sticky mess that will retain all the grit and dirt that it comes in contact with eventually blackening.

For deck teak, I agree that it should be left natural and cleaned 2-3 time a season with a dilute mixture of Clorox in water to kill mildew. Alternatively, try OxyClean, it does a great job of cleaning the deck and killing off the mildew/mold.

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