Oil teak cockpit grate? - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance
 Not a Member? 
  #1  
Old 04-26-2010
kwaltersmi's Avatar
Broad Reachin'
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Grand Rapids, Michigan
Posts: 1,846
Thanks: 1
Thanked 12 Times in 12 Posts
Rep Power: 9
kwaltersmi is on a distinguished road
Oil teak cockpit grate?

Our boat has a teak cockpit grate, which to my knowledge has never had any oil or other sealer/protectant applied. It currently has the gray weathered looked look of natural, uncoated teak. It's great underfoot, with a smooth natural non-slip feel.

Is there any reason to apply a couple coats of teak oil to the grate? I realized weathered teak provides excellent non-skid and the gray color doesn't bother me at all. However, I was thinking the oil might make the grate last longer...but then again, the oil might also make the grate slippery. Any thoughts or opinions?
__________________
Catalina 34

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 04-26-2010
DwayneSpeer's Avatar
Old Fart
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Pasco, WA, USA
Posts: 514
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 11
DwayneSpeer is on a distinguished road
Oil?

Leave it alone. It will last very long without the addition of any oil. Just don't let it sit in water for long periods, that is, make sure your cockpit drains are working well.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


Hey, can one of you guys pass me a crab?


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 04-26-2010
tager's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 991
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 6
tager is on a distinguished road
Don't apply oil. It will turn black.

That being said I just stripped and varnished mine... but I enjoy punishment.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 04-26-2010
kwaltersmi's Avatar
Broad Reachin'
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Grand Rapids, Michigan
Posts: 1,846
Thanks: 1
Thanked 12 Times in 12 Posts
Rep Power: 9
kwaltersmi is on a distinguished road
Doesn't the varnish make it more slippery, particularly when wet?
__________________
Catalina 34

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 04-26-2010
tager's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 991
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 6
tager is on a distinguished road
You put on a real thick finish coat, and add salt or sugar on top of it.

Never tried it, but have seen it done. I showed up just as the rock salt was being rinsed off the deck. It was nicely nonskid.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 04-26-2010
T37SOLARE's Avatar
Tartan 37C
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Chesapeake Bay - HHS
Posts: 501
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 7
T37SOLARE is on a distinguished road
Quote:
uncoated teak. It's great underfoot, with a smooth natural non-slip feel.
For the cockpit or any decking, leave it untreated.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

SOLARE
T-37 #442
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 04-26-2010
CalebD's Avatar
Tartan 27' owner
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: NYC
Posts: 4,520
Thanks: 4
Thanked 84 Times in 77 Posts
Rep Power: 7
CalebD will become famous soon enough
Wow! Since everyone else has expressed their opinions on teak oil above I will express mine which are derived from working on the too-much-exterior teak on my boat.
- teak oil does not turn the wood black.
there is a fungus that can attack the wood when it gets dried out (of oil) and the fungus can grow. This is why some people swear by using just salt water on their teak as the residual salt kills it. Fresh water would not provide the same protection. Black spots can be bleached out. Perhaps a solution of water and sea salt (or any salt) would act as a good brine or pickling solution for the teak if you want to stay with the silver/gray look (haven't tried this yet but you GL sailors might try it).
- teak oil will not be slippery like varnish.
the oil will seep into the wood and the surface can be wiped down with alcohol to pick up any remaining moisture. Oiling the wood can even make the grain stand up a little giving you more traction while varnishing tends to flatten and smooth out the finish making it more slippery. I know, as I sanded, oiled and varnished our cockpit gratings and even though they still look pretty good 6 years later I still kind of hate using them. The sheets and other lines can get between the slats and they are slippery when wet.
- teak is known to be an oily wood. Giving it more oil can't be a bad thing for it if it is clean and I do believe that it is good for the wood in the long run.
- I also agree with the other posters in that leaving the wood alone, untreated (or salted as I am advocating) is the easiest way to go as the maintenance seems minimal. I am just not sure what this does to the wood on a cellular level if it dries out. I happen to like the look of oiled teak so I get the tyranny of the teak.

I say go with salt water solution rinses periodically if you want to stay gray; go with teak oil if you want the rich ruddy teak color.
__________________
"The cure for anything is salt water~ sweat, tears, or the sea." ~Isak Denesen

Everybody has one:

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 04-26-2010
tager's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 991
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 6
tager is on a distinguished road
Teak oil makes teak attract dirt, and looks terrible. I don't know about anyone else, but that is my experience with it. It makes the teak dark and muddy. Ugly.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #9  
Old 04-26-2010
CalebD's Avatar
Tartan 27' owner
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: NYC
Posts: 4,520
Thanks: 4
Thanked 84 Times in 77 Posts
Rep Power: 7
CalebD will become famous soon enough
Wow! Since everyone else has expressed their opinions on teak oil above I will express mine which are derived from working on the too-much-exterior teak on my boat.
- teak oil does not turn the wood black.
there is a fungus that can attack the wood when it gets dried out (of oil) and the fungus can grow. This is why some people swear by using just salt water on their teak as the residual salt kills it. Fresh water would not provide the same protection. Black spots can be bleached out. Perhaps a solution of water and sea salt (or any salt) would act as a good brine or pickling solution for the teak if you want to stay with the silver/gray look (haven't tried this yet but you GL sailors might try it).
- teak oil will not be slippery like varnish.
the oil will seep into the wood and the surface can be wiped down with alcohol to pick up any remaining moisture. Oiling the wood can even make the grain stand up a little giving you more traction while varnishing tends to flatten and smooth out the finish making it more slippery. I know, as I sanded, oiled and varnished our cockpit gratings and even though they still look pretty good 6 years later I still kind of hate using them. The sheets and other lines can get between the slats and they are slippery when wet.
- teak is known to be an oily wood. Giving it more oil can't be a bad thing for it if it is clean and I do believe that it is good for the wood in the long run.
- I also agree with the other posters in that leaving the wood alone, untreated (or salted as I am advocating) is the easiest way to go as the maintenance seems minimal. I am just not sure what this does to the wood on a cellular level if it dries out. I happen to like the look of oiled teak so I get the tyranny of the teak.

I say go with salt water solution rinses periodically if you want to stay gray; go with teak oil if you want the rich ruddy teak color.
__________________
"The cure for anything is salt water~ sweat, tears, or the sea." ~Isak Denesen

Everybody has one:

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #10  
Old 04-27-2010
RichH's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2000
Location: Pennsylvania
Posts: 2,812
Thanks: 9
Thanked 71 Times in 64 Posts
Rep Power: 15
RichH will become famous soon enough
Quote:
Originally Posted by kwaltersmi View Post
Our boat has a teak cockpit grate, which to my knowledge has never had any oil or other sealer/protectant applied. It currently has the gray weathered looked look of natural, uncoated teak. It's great underfoot, with a smooth natural non-slip feel.

Is there any reason to apply a couple coats of teak oil to the grate? I realized weathered teak provides excellent non-skid and the gray color doesn't bother me at all. However, I was thinking the oil might make the grate last longer...but then again, the oil might also make the grate slippery. Any thoughts or opinions?
Teak that has become grey has been UV burned ... destroying the topmost wood cells. In several years of UV exposure the teak surface will become badly eroded. Teak is now costing .... approaching $40 per board foot; so, protecting it is very prudent IMHO.

Teak Oil usually doesnt have sufficient UV retardants and if applied 'thick' will oxidize and eventually turn dark; plus, it can get quite slippery when wetted.

Your situation is probably best served by an application of a TEAK SEALER. Many have pigmentation additives that help to retard the inevitabale UV destruction. For high wear, high traffic areas I prefer SEMCO (goldtone).... for other areas I prefer a 50:50 mix of Semco goldtone and Teak Wonder. Such (minimum of 2 wet coats) will last about one full season .... less if the sealer is constantly washed by boarding 'green waves'.

Rx: Etch/scrub the grate with TSP to get rid of the UV damage ('grey'), then bleach with Oxalic Acid, and then apply a minimum of 2 coats of Teak Sealer. :-)
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Techniques for Removing Teak Decks Sue & Larry Buying a Boat Articles 0 11-24-2003 07:00 PM
The Cruising Cockpit Sue & Larry Buying a Boat Articles 0 07-08-2003 08:00 PM
The Cruising Cockpit Sue & Larry Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 07-08-2003 08:00 PM
The Cruising Cockpit Sue & Larry Cruising Articles 0 07-08-2003 08:00 PM
Homemade Teak Decks SailNet Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 08-01-2002 08:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:40 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.