What is the best interior Teak Oil? - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance
 Not a Member? 


Like Tree2Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 04-27-2010
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 89
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
Petar is on a distinguished road
What is the best interior Teak Oil?

Never mind the price, looking for the best quality and protection. Heard that Watco Danish teak oil from Home Depot is pretty good? Any suggestions on brand and best application method?
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 04-27-2010
blt2ski's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 6,704
Thanks: 0
Thanked 21 Times in 20 Posts
Rep Power: 10
blt2ski will become famous soon enough
All of my interior teak is varnished. Frankly, not sure I would want it oiled. On deck is not too bad. I redid my interior with "Top Secrete" spar varnish, I would assume any other brand would work just as well. This brand did not have the yellow tint like some brands of spar varnish has.

marty
__________________
She drives me boat,
I drives me dinghy!
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 04-27-2010
ASA and PSIA Instructor
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Posts: 3,457
Thanks: 6
Thanked 17 Times in 17 Posts
Rep Power: 15
sailingfool will become famous soon enough
Watco is a brand...
__________________
Certified...in several regards...
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 04-27-2010
S/V Stardust
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: NJ
Posts: 23
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
jlenox is on a distinguished road
Not sure if it is technically appropriate or not, but I used lemon oil on the cabin teak. It gave the cabin a nice smell and seemed to refresh the wood.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 04-27-2010
blackjenner's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: in a condo
Posts: 250
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 5
blackjenner is on a distinguished road
conditioning teak

So this may seem silly and I'm all ears when it comes to alternatives but, when I owned my last boat I treated my teak with Johnsons Paste Wax. Yes, the stuff that comes in the yellow can that you can buy anywhere.

I'd put a glob in my hand, or on a non-absorbent fabric, and rub it into the bare teak until it was smooth. It conditioned the teak, made it repel water and moisture, kept it smelling nice and made the teak grippy, especially on your hands.

I did it for three years. The teak always looked great and an application lasted quite a while.

Did I mention I could buy it at almost any store and it was tres' cheap?
EvelynL likes this.
__________________
"There's nothing . . . absolutely nothing . . . half so much worth doing as simply messing around in boats." -- Kenneth Grahame, The Wind in the Willows (River Rat to Mole)

1980 Baba 35 Pilot House Cutter - Brigadoon


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 04-27-2010
nk235's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Long Island
Posts: 404
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
nk235 is on a distinguished road
I just use regular old orange oil and it comes out looking and smelling great. I tried buying expensive special teak oil at the marine store and it doesn't work half as good. Also I don't know about your boat but sometimes on mine I get a little whiteish in color mold that forms on the interior teak and makes the wood look dry and worn out. I go over the entire surface of the interior cabin with a cleaning solution containing bleach to kill the mold and to clean the wood. I then follow up with the orange oil and it really transforms the boat, makes it smell great and keeps the teak in good shape.

I have also heard simple lemon oil works great as well. Save your money on the expensive stuff.

Nick
__________________
Morgan 323
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 04-27-2010
Sabreman's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Location: Yeocomico River, VA
Posts: 1,606
Thanks: 2
Thanked 14 Times in 11 Posts
Rep Power: 10
Sabreman will become famous soon enough Sabreman will become famous soon enough
Teak is a naturally oily wood that resists decay. This is why is is used in marine applications and why it must be wiped with acetone or laquer thinner prior to varnishing to remove the surface oils and allow the film finish to dry. There is no reason to put oil on an oily wood. Even if that wood is a veneer. The only reason to put any finish on teak at all is to protect it and keep it clean. Oils that are applied to teak act to trap dirt and grease.

On both our boats, I had to strip years of grime and Murphy's Oil with acteone followed by a light sanding and 6 coats of satin urethane. High traffic or UV areas received gloss urethane. The result is a finish that needs no maintenance other than a wipe of a mild soap from time to time.

VICTORIA (and her mistress)
__________________
Sabre 38 "Victoria"
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 04-28-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Central Arkansas
Posts: 209
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 5
tomwatt is on a distinguished road
Watco wood oil is primarily a furniture-quality finish. I don't think it would fare well on outdoor teak. And in-cabin teak would probably fare better being varnished. Just my opinion, but I spent a few years in the paint industry and sold and used quite a bit of that stuff.
A boat interior is generally about the same environment as occasional-use patio furniture... fair amount of moisture, etc. And varnish is mfr'd. from the same kinds of oils that are used as wood finishing oils... I would be concerned that oiling the wood wouldn't hold up as well as several coats of varnish, especially if you've got a moist boat interior (some are better than others - mine tends to get a bit wet inside).
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #9  
Old 04-28-2010
JimsCAL's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Glen Cove, NY
Posts: 2,447
Thanks: 2
Thanked 37 Times in 36 Posts
Rep Power: 8
JimsCAL is on a distinguished road
On my previous boat the spring routine was to wash all the interior teak with Murphys Oil Soap and then apply teak oil. Teak looked great. I used West Marine and other brands. Didn't see much difference between brands.

My new boat has varnished interior teak. I love the look but hope it doesn't take a lot of time to keep it up. If it was oiled, I would continue my old routine, not bother varnishing it.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #10  
Old 04-28-2010
nk235's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Long Island
Posts: 404
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
nk235 is on a distinguished road
While your opinion may certainly be good advice it does not mean it is the only way to do things. Teak is a great type of wood for the marine environment and while it does resist decay better than other woods it also doesn't mean it is permanatly immune to decay/drying out. I have been on plenty of boats where the teak looked like crap both on the inside and outside due to lack of care. Varnish in the cabin is also great but takes a lot of time and precision to do a whole cabin especially one with a lot of teak such as the boat I have. I feel a twice a season application of rubbing in a light oil after thoughrough cleaning makes the interior teak loo and smell amazing as well as keeps it fresh looking.

I am not saying this way is the only way to do things but I do know it works for me as well as many other boat owners I know. I don't mean to come off as confrontational especially on something as simple as teak oil discussion but I didn't agree with your post that there is only one right way to go about it.

Regards
Nick

A couple of Pics of the cabin of Capricorn, my Morgan 323







Quote:
Originally Posted by Sabreman View Post
Teak is a naturally oily wood that resists decay. This is why is is used in marine applications and why it must be wiped with acetone or laquer thinner prior to varnishing to remove the surface oils and allow the film finish to dry. There is no reason to put oil on an oily wood. Even if that wood is a veneer. The only reason to put any finish on teak at all is to protect it and keep it clean. Oils that are applied to teak act to trap dirt and grease.

On both our boats, I had to strip years of grime and Murphy's Oil with acteone followed by a light sanding and 6 coats of satin urethane. High traffic or UV areas received gloss urethane. The result is a finish that needs no maintenance other than a wipe of a mild soap from time to time.

VICTORIA (and her mistress)
__________________
Morgan 323
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Yanmar baffling black smoke Tspringer Diesel 27 08-03-2012 09:44 AM
High Thrust prop ? 75R20 Gear & Maintenance 14 04-20-2010 02:57 PM
Oil Change experience - Lessons Learned kmeeks Gear & Maintenance 33 04-16-2010 08:55 AM
W60 - No oil pressure after oil change??? pma_foyl Gear & Maintenance 9 12-01-2004 09:45 AM
Changing Engine Oil Tom Wood Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 10-02-2002 08:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:44 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.