Life/Headsails/Compromises - SailNet Community
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 9 Old 04-28-2010 Thread Starter
Large Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Texas
Posts: 1,000
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 9
 
Life/Headsails/Compromises

I was wanting to get some feedback about genoas/jibs/roller furlings.

Ref: Mac26 classic (not the motorsailer) with roller furling.
use:Cruiser not a racer
location: South Texas bays
winds: usually 10 - 20mph
Main issues:

My 135% genoa needs to be replaced. After talking to some people that know the Mac, the 150% genoa seems to be the preferred size for a genoa, mainly due to the chain plates/shrouds placed so far out (at the hull) that the 135% is hard to sheet properly.

People say you loose a lot of pointing ability / performance, with a 150% furled up to a standard size jib. I have only sailed with a 135% and to be honest, it seemed to point pretty well but I wonder if the 150% might be noticeably worse.

Ideally, in a good breeze it's better to have a jib, in light air, downwind, it's better to have a genoa.

One other Mac owner, changes his sails on his roller depending on the wind conditions. He's more of a racer than me.

I understand that roller furlings are by their nature, a compromise.

How do others decide on type/size of their head sails?

I plan on taking her out with a hanked on jib to experiment before ordering a new sail. (a jib also came with the boat, although has never been used)
mdbee is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 9 Old 04-28-2010
Senior Member
 
blt2ski's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 6,884
Thanks: 0
Thanked 30 Times in 29 Posts
Rep Power: 12
   
Frankly, in 10-20 knot winds if that is ave, a 135-140 will be ample. You will do reasonably well in 10 knot winds, yet can hold it to 20, granted you might be pushing a 135 at 20, but it can be done. On my boat, a 155 is pretty much past ok at or around 15 steady. At 20, my 110 and full main is nice, a reef and the 140 works well too.

I can actually point higher with the 110, but my tracks for the blade are different, and farther in ward than my tracks for the 130, 140 and 155 sails I have.

Marty

She drives me boat,
I drives me dinghy!
blt2ski is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #3 of 9 Old 04-29-2010
Telstar 28
 
sailingdog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,290
Thanks: 0
Thanked 15 Times in 12 Posts
Rep Power: 14
         
The main way to decide what size headsail to get is to determine what the average conditions you'll be sailing the boat in most often. If you sail in an area with high winds, then a small genoa or even a working jib might be a good idea. If you sail in an area with very light winds as the typical conditions, then a light 150% genny might be a good choice.

I'd point out that most roller furling setups will not have very good sail shape if any more than 30% of the sail is reefed as a general rule. Adding a foam or rope luff to the sail can help with this, but only to a small degree.

Also, sailing in conditions that REQUIRE you to sail with a heavily reefed genny will often end up damaging the genny, since it may be of lighter cloth than is really designed for heavier wind conditions—leading to the cloth being distorted and stretched out unevenly from using it heavily reefed.

If you sail in an area with normally heavier winds, then a good compromise might be to get a 110-130% genny and add a wire luff screacher that is on a furling drum to use for light air conditions.

Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
sailingdog is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #4 of 9 Old 04-29-2010
ASA and PSIA Instructor
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Posts: 3,589
Thanks: 7
Thanked 25 Times in 25 Posts
Rep Power: 16
 
I believe you havea lightly-ballasted boat, so a 150% as a primary sail would be an even worse choice than it would be anyway...forgetaboutit. A 150% wont point any better than a 135% with a wide shroud base, the small sail gives you more chance to trim inside the shroud, tho a 135% probably not.

Get a 135% with a luff pad that improves the furling reef so its a little better, still a compromise. I personally prefer to change down if needed...

Certified...in several regards...
sailingfool is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #5 of 9 Old 04-29-2010
Just another Moderator
 
Faster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: New Westminster, BC
Posts: 16,563
Thanks: 110
Thanked 317 Times in 302 Posts
Rep Power: 10
     
Yeah, even not racing if you had a 135 and a working jib, and simply chose the right one for the day (proves/uses you headsail halyard on a regular basis) you'll have much more controlled and enjoyable sailing.

For better downwind results think about a spinnaker (either type) rather than adding a 150 to the mix. It will add to your skills and enjoyment (though perhaps take away from your wallet....)

Ron

1984 Fast/Nicholson 345 "FastForward"

".. there is much you could do at sea with common sense.. and very little you could do without it.."
Capt G E Ericson (from "The Cruel Sea" by Nicholas Monsarrat)
Faster is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #6 of 9 Old 04-29-2010
Senior Member
 
CaptKermie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Greater Vancouver B.C. Canada
Posts: 433
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 9
 
I use both a 100% jib and 150% genoa on my furler and change them out depending on how much wind there is that day. The jib track is on the forward cabin top and leads the sheets inside the shrouds so I do tend to point higher with the jib. The genoa tracks are way aft on the cockpit combings and lead the sheets on the outside of the shrouds so I do not point as high but the genoa is a godsend when winds are light which they generally are in the PNW. Unless it is really blowing a gale, it is usually light, we get the extremes here. I find having two headsail choices a blessing and I only cruise, not much into racing. Conditions here are too subject to change so I prefer the two headsail choice setup. I also have a furler that easily facilitates changing headsails, not a big deal. I use the 150% genoa most of the time. I have a 2003 MacGregor 26M.

Last edited by CaptKermie; 04-29-2010 at 01:34 PM. Reason: Forgot something
CaptKermie is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #7 of 9 Old 04-29-2010 Thread Starter
Large Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Texas
Posts: 1,000
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 9
 
CaptK

I really hadn't thought about switching out the sail on the roller furling, based on wind conditions. Perhaps I will add that to the mix of options.
At about what wind speeds do you decide to go with the 100% jib?

I did have a passing thought about rigging a removable forestay slightly aft of the roller furling headstay, to hang a jib on for days with heavier wind conditions.

I suppose ignorance is bliss. I have been sailing with a 135 roller furling genoa for 5 years without an issue. Now I am confused

I was just going to replace with another 135, but several of the Mac sites have said they don't recommend the 135. I can understand that a 150 rolled up to 100, wouldn't look too good.

Of course this really isn't a Mac issue. For those others with roller furlings and 135 - 150 genoa's, how small do you reef them when the wind picks up?


Quote:
Originally Posted by CaptKermie View Post
I use both a 100% jib and 150% genoa on my furler and change them out depending on how much wind there is that day. The jib track is on the forward cabin top and leads the sheets inside the shrouds so I do tend to point higher with the jib. The genoa tracks are way aft on the cockpit combings and lead the sheets on the outside of the shrouds so I do not point as high but the genoa is a godsend when winds are light which they generally are in the PNW. Unless it is really blowing a gale, it is usually light, we get the extremes here. I find having two headsail choices a blessing and I only cruise, not much into racing. Conditions here are too subject to change so I prefer the two headsail choice setup. I also have a furler that easily facilitates changing headsails, not a big deal. I use the 150% genoa most of the time. I have a 2003 MacGregor 26M.
mdbee is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #8 of 9 Old 04-30-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 2,248
Thanks: 6
Thanked 70 Times in 68 Posts
Rep Power: 9
 
I wouldn't second guess yourself here. If you've been sailing for 5 years with your 135 % and have been happy, with the performance I wouid stick with it. A new sail will give you even better performance, if your old one was blown out.

When, It was time for me to replace my headsail, I went from a 150 to a 135 and never looked back. With your average winds of 10-20, I believe you have the correct headsail if you're cruising.

Tempest
Sabre 34
Morgan, NJ
Tempest is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #9 of 9 Old 04-30-2010 Thread Starter
Large Member
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Texas
Posts: 1,000
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 9
 
analysis paralysis syndrome

analysis paralysis syndrome, I know it well




Quote:
Originally Posted by Tempest View Post
I wouldn't second guess yourself here. If you've been sailing for 5 years with your 135 % and have been happy, with the performance I wouid stick with it. A new sail will give you even better performance, if your old one was blown out.

When, It was time for me to replace my headsail, I went from a 150 to a 135 and never looked back. With your average winds of 10-20, I believe you have the correct headsail if you're cruising.
mdbee is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.


User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome