New sailor needs to replace boat name - Page 2 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance
 Not a Member? 
  #11  
Old 05-06-2010
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 12
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Harpmary is on a distinguished road
Thanks, everyone. The boat is currently in the slip, but I think I can pull it close enough to the edge to reach the lettering with a razor blade. In terms of putting the new name on, how hard is it? Should we get a sign shop artist to apply the lettering? Or should we try to do it ourselves?
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #12  
Old 05-06-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: Chicago area
Posts: 107
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 11
imiloa is on a distinguished road
Apply it yourself

We ordered our new lettering from the BoatUS site and applied it ourselves. Like most things preparation is the worst yet most important part of the process. Be sure the area where you're applying the letters is scrupulously clean. When you plan where the new lettering will be take into account things that could get in the way - swim ladder mounts, exhaust outlet, other drains or vents, etc. BoatUS provides instructions involving soap solution in a spray bottle IIRC and that makes positioning the letters easy. We marked the location (to get things level and centered) lightly with a grease pencil before sticking the letters on. All in all it was an easy job and turned out great. As has been said here already the un-naming and re-naming ceremonies are important (and fun!) so don't skip that part.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #13  
Old 05-06-2010
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 12
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Harpmary is on a distinguished road
Thanks, everyone. Has anyone applied the new vinyl lettering while the boat is in the water? We have the boat in her slip. I can probably pull it closer to the edge so I can reach to remove the old lettering. - Mary
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #14  
Old 05-06-2010
remetau's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Bradenton, FL
Posts: 780
Thanks: 0
Thanked 6 Times in 6 Posts
Rep Power: 6
remetau is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harpmary View Post
Thanks, everyone. Has anyone applied the new vinyl lettering while the boat is in the water? We have the boat in her slip. I can probably pull it closer to the edge so I can reach to remove the old lettering. - Mary
We did. We used the same methods discussed here. It was done on a nice calm day, and wasn't difficult at all.

If your boat is documented, don't forget to change it with the coast guard.
__________________
Don & Diana
sv Re Metau an HC33t

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #15  
Old 05-06-2010
October Moon B43
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: SE Pennsylvania
Posts: 400
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 6
MJBrown is on a distinguished road
Mary, yes it's fairly easy to apply them yourself even if the boat is in the water. A calm day is best obviously. Remove all the old lettering and use acetone or other cleaner to remove all the old lettering and any wax. Mark the hull with a pencil or other marker that will come off when you're done. There are two ways of applying the lettering, wet or dry. Wet allows you to move the lettering if you dont get it just right the first time. Plain water works best. Do not use windex as it can cause shrinkage issues with the vinyl. With dry you can peel it back as long as you haven't rubbed it out yet. With either you'll have to remove the backing before you apply the lettering to the hull. If the lettering is large due to a long name or graphics it is easier to tape it in place across the top and cut vertically between managable groups of letters removing the backing as you go. This makes it much easier to handle plus you can match up the edges where you cut to keep everything aligned. Once it's aligned to your satisfaction use a plastic putty type knife to press on the lettering. If you get the letters from a sign shop they usually give you one. Ask if they don't offer. Work out any large bubbles carefully so they don't fold or pinch. Smaller bubbles will disappear with tthe heat from the sun and time. Once you're done pressing the letters onto the hull and you happy with how it looks you can remove the facing revealing your nice new name. Take your time, measure twice, tape it in place to be sure it looks right before you remove the backing, step back and inspect before you commit. Good luck
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #16  
Old 05-06-2010
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 9
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
teredosn is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by jbondy View Post
See the link below to John Vigor's Denaming and Naming rituals.

48° Vigor's Interdenominational Boat Denaming Ceremony
I used this when I renamed our SF Pelican. For libation I chose the "Full Sail Ale" from one of our local micro-brews on the assumption that whatever local gods of the sea in the Seattle area would appreciate it. The obvious alternative would have been a Starbucks coffee, but the ale was cheaper.

Thus far this seems to have worked as the number of times leaving the dock plus the number of times returning to the dock divided by two does not have a remainder.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #17  
Old 05-06-2010
GeorgeB's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Alameda, San Francisco Bay
Posts: 1,453
Thanks: 1
Thanked 34 Times in 33 Posts
Rep Power: 10
GeorgeB is on a distinguished road
Mary, one vital step that people are glossing over is sanding/compounding your transom (or wherever the old letting was) before you apply your new name. No matter how meticulously maintained, the gelcote under the old lettering will be much, much fresher than the surrounding areas. So what you will get is a “ghost” of the original name appearing under your new lettering. My advice to you is to compound and polish the heck out of the area before applying the new lettering (See Maine Sail’s instructions on polishing). On a twenty year old boat you may even have to wet sand with 400 grit before polishing. My personal preference would be to use the heat gun (less chance of gouging the gelcote), then using an electrical buffer for the compounding /polishing. You do need to be careful operating electrical tools around the waterline, but, if you have a somewhat steady dock that you can back the boat up close to, you should be alright. Hauling will allow you to do a more thorough job and if you haul over a weekend, you will be able to polish the rest of the hull so it will match the sparkling “new” transom. After you’re done, remember to have a renaming ceremony. The most critical components as I recall is champagne and inviting all your friends and new dock neighbors to the party! Congratulations on your new boat – may you always have fair breezes and following seas.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #18  
Old 05-06-2010
Livia's Avatar
Vagabond in Training
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 221
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 9
Livia is on a distinguished road
I just replaced our hailing port. I used Prism Graphics from Seattle and they mailed the letters to me (I wanted to match the color and font from the original name and they had done the original work).

They included great instructions for doing it yourself in the envelope. We backed into our slip and arranged the lines so the stern was up against the dock (well, a fender) and I did it myself.

SV Estrellita 5.10b: All hail the new hailing port
__________________
A l'eau, c'est l'heure
s/v Estrellita 5.10b, Wauquiez Pretorien 35

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
//
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
//
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #19  
Old 05-06-2010
chucklesR's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Pasadena Md - Magothy side
Posts: 5,977
Thanks: 10
Thanked 30 Times in 30 Posts
Rep Power: 9
chucklesR is a jewel in the rough chucklesR is a jewel in the rough chucklesR is a jewel in the rough
The raised letters will be an issue, however you can always put on the new name this year while in the water and then next time it's out do the sanding and polishing act to remove them. That is best done while on the hard.
Lots of advice laying around on the internet regarding that.
__________________
Lessons learned are opportunities earned.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #20  
Old 05-06-2010
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 9 Times in 9 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
They do make "plastic razor blades" that will remove the vinyl without the risks of gouging the gelcoat.

I would go with a local sign company, rather than someone over the internet, since you'll have better support and can see the letters in person, rather than just an image created on a screen before buying.
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Making Passage w/o a Rudder wind_magic Seamanship & Navigation 60 07-16-2010 01:23 PM
Naming and Renaming Your Boat Sue & Larry Cruising Articles 0 12-15-2003 07:00 PM
Rust Never Sleeps John Kretschmer Buying a Boat Articles 0 02-27-2003 07:00 PM
Preparing Your Boat for Winter Bruce Caldwell Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 11-03-2002 07:00 PM
Refitting an Older Boat Sue & Larry Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 12-16-2000 07:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 10:27 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.