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-   -   Anchor woes (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/gear-maintenance/65352-anchor-woes.html)

bobdamiano 06-06-2010 07:29 PM

Anchor woes
 
Hello,

Our new-to-us Pearson 34 came with a very nice 35 lb CQR. The bow roller they installed seems comically small for the anchor and it really wants to just fall off the boat. The previous owner rigged a thin preventer line to hold it back and keep it sitting in the roller.

Here is a picture I took on survey day last year: Picasa Web Albums - Bob

The other problem is that we keep the boat on a mooring and the mooring lines chafe on the anchor if we install it.

So, at this point we don't feel safe keeping the anchor installed. It sits in the lazarette we figure we'll pull it out and rig it if we're anchoring somewhere. This however leaves us with no quick way to deploy an anchor in an emergency.

I see a couple options:
1. put a proper sized roller on the boat and keep this cqr rigged.
2. get a smaller anchor (maybe a fluke) mounted on this roller to deploy in emergencies and swap in the big cqr for any over-nighters.
3. same as 2 but just keep the fluke handy in the lazarette and don't put anything on the roller normally.
4. something brilliant I haven't thought of

We appreciate any opinions on what we should do. Thanks

Bob and Linda

Maine Sail 06-06-2010 07:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bobdamiano (Post 610461)

The other problem is that we keep the boat on a mooring and the mooring lines chafe on the anchor if we install it.


Bob and Linda

Remove the anchor from the roller when on the mooring. This is a very common cause of pendants parting in storms. We have over 1200 boats in our anchorage and after each storm I try to view as many of the grounded boats as possible. Surprisingly many of the pendants are NOT parted at the bow chock but rather where the anchor chafed it. I only live down the street from my boat and the anchor comes off and goes in the locker when she is on the mooring. Generally speaking changing the roller will not help prevent chafe in a storm when the bow is pitching three or four feet up and down.

You're not the only one with these issues but one of the few with the common sense to actually consider the potential problems..
http://www.pbase.com/mainecruising/image/118091674.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/mainecruising/image/116354027.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/mainecruising/image/92913528.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/mainecruising/image/92913762.jpg

http://www.pbase.com/mainecruising/image/102913572.jpg
http://www.pbase.com/mainecruising/image/102913569.jpg

bobdamiano 06-06-2010 07:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Maine Sail (Post 610463)
Remove the anchor from the roller when on the mooring.

Thanks. As I said, this is exactly what we do. We're just not crazy about the inability to deploy it quickly if there was a problem.

Gene T 06-06-2010 07:44 PM

I would change the anchor roller anyway, but I agree you can remove the anchor while on the mooring. You can also tie the fluke of a CQR to one side to get it out of the way a little more.

Gene

Plumbean 06-06-2010 08:45 PM

This is timely. I came off the boat today and told the wife I was done with the 45 pound claw that came with our boat and getting a fluke to stick in the cockpit locker. I have a large bow roller compared to yours, but it doesn't make a difference when it comes to chafing the mooring lines. So off comes the anchor when we are done sailing and then, because there isn't an easy place to store the darn thing while sailing, I have to put it back on the bow whenever we want to go out. If we plan on anchoring out, I'll put it back on the bow, but in the meantime I plan on keeping a fluke in the cockpit locker that can be deployed in an emergency.

deniseO30 06-06-2010 09:57 PM

Bob.. is it possible your boat is missing a bow plank? Don't know if would be called a bowspirit. It's a pretty hefty piece of teak. I've one on my boat and it keeps the anchor well away from the boat. But, I keep the anchor in the locker anyway.

JimCate 06-06-2010 11:31 PM

G'Day Bob,

Another approack is to hang the anchor from the pulpit whilst on the mooring, thus freeing up the roller and getting the sharp bits of the anchor well out of the way. With your unusually long pulpit it would be WELL out of the way!!

Cheers,

Jim and Ann s/v Insatiable II lying Port Stephens, NSW, Oz

bobdamiano 06-07-2010 05:02 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JimCate (Post 610520)
G'Day Bob,

Another approack is to hang the anchor from the pulpit whilst on the mooring, thus freeing up the roller and getting the sharp bits of the anchor well out of the way. With your unusually long pulpit it would be WELL out of the way!!

Actually the pulpit has been expertly reworked and it now fits the boat much better. This is the last (maybe only) P34 built by Bristol Yachts for "Cal-Pearson" in 1997 (hull 61). The boat was unfinished when Bristol went out of business. Between the large pulpit and tiny roller, one gets the impression they were just trying to finis up this boat with any spare parts they had laying around.

Gladrags1 06-07-2010 05:24 AM

I agree with the poster who recommended that you tie the anchor up and out of the way while on the mooring. You SHOULD have it ready for deployment while sailing in the event of emergency. You should NOT replace it with an undersized anchor while sailing since the undersized anchor will do nothing to secure the boat in the event of emergency. I wouldn't do anything about replacing the roller. I agree it seems small for the anchor but the anchor seems to sit in there ok and probably rolls off it and back on ok. I would look to see what I could do to keep it from hopping out of the roller in the event of going over some big waves, crashing and banging. You don't want the anchor jumping up and out and then swinging wildly. There are 2 holes at the top forward corner, above the roller. Could these be used to strap the anchor down?

Another thing you could do at the mooring is make a bridle that goes from 1 cleat on the starboard side to the other cleat on the port side of the bow that slips through the pendant. Put the bridle through an old piece of hose cut to size to protect from shafe on either side of the pendant and you will have a good, secure system.

Tod

AdamLein 06-07-2010 12:32 PM

I like the hang-from-pulpit idea as it minimizes the amount of work to do to get your anchor ready for cruising.

A variation on the theme: turn the anchor upside-down, leave it on the roller, and suspend it in that position from the pulpit.


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