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-   -   Replacing bulkhead bolted chainplates with deck bolted with a wire strut (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/gear-maintenance/66130-replacing-bulkhead-bolted-chainplates-deck-bolted-wire-strut.html)

MAnDaRIn 07-02-2010 05:02 PM

Replacing bulkhead bolted chainplates with deck bolted with a wire strut
 
4 Attachment(s)
My double chainplates are bolted to the bulkhead and have dry rott. previous owner moved it over a couple inches and raised it with teak boards and bolted thru again(see pic1and 2). I have removed the bulkhead and want to replace the chainplates with double deck bolted ones that connect to a wire strut attached to the hull(see 3 and 4 double with out that other attachment to the chainplate cover). Where can i buy this kind of chainplate?

sailingdog 07-02-2010 05:31 PM

While most machine shops could make them for you, I wouldn't recommend doing that without consulting a marine architect. Your boat was designed to have its rig in a certain position and moving it may cause serious issues.

I'd point out that the bulkhead in question is clearly structural, and needs to be replaced before you can use the boat.

It would help if you said what kind of boat you had, since there may be a known fix for the boat that other owners have come up with.

mitiempo 07-02-2010 05:52 PM

I agree with dog. While the chainplate in pics 3 & 4 looks good, the original method used on your boat is probably stronger with a solid bulkhead properly glassed in as it spreads the load over a wider area. Most manufacturers use a method like this because of its strength. Usually they only vary it when the accomodations don't allow it.
As dog said the bulkhead requires proper replacement regardless.

MAnDaRIn 07-02-2010 06:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sailingdog (Post 619100)
While most machine shops could make them for you, I wouldn't recommend doing that without consulting a marine architect. Your boat was designed to have its rig in a certain position and moving it may cause serious issues.

I'd point out that the bulkhead in question is clearly structural, and needs to be replaced before you can use the boat.

It would help if you said what kind of boat you had, since there may be a known fix for the boat that other owners have come up with.

i know what happens when you move the chainplate around. I'm talking about putting it in the same place, same hole through the deck. bulkhead is not structural some previous owner glassed it in with polyester resin when i removed it most of the cloth wasn't stuck to the bulkhead.they aren't glassed in on other boats of the same make. before I had it hauled out I sailed thru a gail or two with out incident but they look to be pulling out from the look of the bolts angle. There is a aluminum vertical compression post that replaced the original horizontal wood one that rode on the bulkheads.
I know i can have someone fabricate them, I'm wondering any companies makes them or if get some that are made for another boat.

mitiempo 07-02-2010 06:40 PM

Unless the boat is still in production custom is probably the only option. What boat?

MAnDaRIn 07-02-2010 06:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mitiempo (Post 619111)
Unless the boat is still in production custom is probably the only option. What boat?

I mean find a boat with the chainplate system I want and look for the parts with that boats make in the title. C34(Catalina)[URL="[URL="http://www.c34.org/projects/projects-chain-plate-rebedding.html"]"] have a similar system but only have one hole for one stay I need a double for two stays.

mitiempo 07-02-2010 08:12 PM

Manufacturers seldom use an off the shelf chainplate, most are custom for each model. You might be able to find one similar but probably not exactly what you want. The hole has to be the correct size for the toggle or turnbuckle your rig uses. A hole too large is a problem. What boat do you have? Maybe someone here could help more if we knew.

sailingdog 07-02-2010 08:32 PM

Well, I am guessing that the bulkhead is structural... it has to be if the chainplates are TIED TO IT. If the bulkhead isn't structural, they would never have tied the chainplates to it. :rolleyes:

Again, it would help if you said what kind of boat you had, since there may be a known fix for the boat that other owners have come up with.

MAnDaRIn 07-03-2010 12:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mitiempo (Post 619133)
Manufacturers seldom use an off the shelf chainplate, most are custom for each model. You might be able to find one similar but probably not exactly what you want. The hole has to be the correct size for the toggle or turnbuckle your rig uses. A hole too large is a problem. What boat do you have? Maybe someone here could help more if we knew.

You're saying there isn't any specific brands of chainplates that people tend to favor like Harken or Schaefer. I thought maybe someone knew one, that is pretty much what I was asking. The holes being the correct size and thickness is a given. already asked the group for the boat but my rig is a custom job very different from the originals.

mitiempo 07-03-2010 12:46 AM

Schaefer makes chainplates but they are all basic stainless chainplates and not what you are after. Here's the link to their chainplate page.
Schaefer Marine Hardware - Product Catalog

Harken is a very innovative company. But chainplates are not really an innovative type of product. They do not make them. Not in my catalog or their online catalog. They are also boat specific so the market would not be worthwhile. The chainplates that come with the boat will last decades if not the life of the boat. Every boat design has different requirements and other than a straight bar type of chainplate which Schaefer has there probably isn't one available to fit your needs. Every rig has different angles and hole sizes and every deck design is different as far as angle is concerned.

Your best bet is to draw exactly what you want, go to a good metal shop specializing in stainless steel and having them custom made. Use 316 and get them electro-polished for the best corrosion resistance. Anyone I know who has either built or restored a boat and needs chainplates, unless they are simple bar stock, gets them custom made as I have in the past.


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