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  #1  
Old 07-06-2010
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Main lies closer to wind than jib

I couldn't decide if that was a seamanship issue or a gear issue, and decided on gear. Anyway:

My boat, a 1975 Newport 28, does not have jib or genny tracks. Instead, it came with two blocks with snap shackles that attach to the aluminum toerail, through which the jib sheets run.

When I'm sailing close hauled, I can always keep the main trimmed closer to the wind than the jib, regardless of where I have the blocks set. I usually have the blocks set back near the cockpit where I figure I have a better angle, but I'm wondering if I should set them further forward where the pull from the block would be more perpendicular to the jib than parallel.

Am I just destined to have a more weatherly main than jib until I put in some tracks that are further inboard than the toe rail?
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Old 07-06-2010
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The wide sheeting angle is going to affect your pointing ability upwind. In addition, keeping in mind that the two sails should 'work together', overtrimming the main just because you can will likely stall it and cause a loss of speed, and extra weather helm.

Adding deck mounted genoa tracks will help you point better and get the two sails cooperating more effectively at that improved pointing ability. (Just don't try to take that to the 'current' sport boat extreme with tracks well inboard on the cabin top.... ) if you decide to add the tracks, remember to take the proper precautions to reinforce the area underneath and prevent any moisture entering the coring (look though Mainesail's excellent posts/site for ideas there)You might try to get a look at another N28 that's had it done and see where they should go.

Here's an example:

View Boat Photos - YachtWorld.com

As far as where your genoa blocks should be, generally the sheet angle from block to clew, when extended to the luff, should roughly intersect the mid point of your jib/genny luff. Neither the foot nor the leech should be excessively tight, or 'hooked".

If you have multiple telltales fitted, they should 'break' or stall together when you luff up. If the uppers go first, move the block forward a notch and try again. If the lowers break first go the other way.
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Last edited by Faster; 07-06-2010 at 08:48 PM.
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Old 07-06-2010
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You can either install tracks or use a barberhauler to bring the genny sheets further inboard.
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Old 07-07-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
You can either install tracks or use a barberhauler to bring the genny sheets further inboard.
+1 and the barberhauler will be less expensive. I'd try that first, though it might prove to be a pain to rig and re-rig every tack.
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Old 07-07-2010
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You can rig a separate barberhauler for each side, so you don't have to rig and unrig it each time. To set up the barberhauler, you need a snatch block for each side and a line for the snatch block—either run through a block and lead back to the cockpit so it can be adjusted or tied off to a padeye on the deck for non-adjustable barberhaulers.
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Old 07-07-2010
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A couple thoughts here:

With your sails set properly, the limit of your pointing ability on a boat like the Newport will be your hull, and keel configuration rather than your sail plan. As a result a barberhaul would not help much in this case.

Normally, when your sails are properly set, it will appear that the mainsail is set closer to the centerline of the boat than the jib. In order to permit airflow between the sails, there needs to be a slot for the air to move through, and so each sail moving forward appears to be outside of, and less strapped than the sail aft of it. This is normal and properly cut sails are shaped with this in mind.

My recollection of the Newport 28 is that the shrouds are fairly close to the cabin side and that there is room for the genoa to pass through the slot formed between the lifelines and shrouds. I may be wrong on this, but my sense is that because the Newport is moderately narrow, I don't believe that you will need deck tracks. The angle to the rail is a narrow enough angle for proper pointing.

In any event, on any boat there is a real limit as to how far inboard you can sheet your genoa. When a genoa that is properly cut and in good shape is properly sheeted, typically the foot of the sail will just tick the outboard most shroud, and where the the upper leech of the sail crosses the shrouds, the leech will be close to the shrouds or spreader (perhaps 4 to 8 inches). Adding deck tracks may not improve this.

As Faster suggests, the first step is getting your sheet lead (angle) correct. If your Genoa does not have them you should have several sets of short telltales on the leading edge of the Genoa. Minimally there should be two sets of these telltales. Minimally there should be one set that is roughly 30% down from the head of the sail and one set that is approximately 25% up from the foot of the sail, each located roughly 18"-20" aft of the luff.

When the sheet lead is right the sets of telltales should both start to luff at the same time. To set the sheet lead properly, pick a spot to place the snatch block that you think roughly bisects the angle of the clew of the sail and sheet in on a beat until the telltales are flying aft. Then slowly turn towards the wind and watch each telltale as you do. Both inside telltales should start to flutter at the same exact moment. (You can cycle through this a few times to check.) If the upper telltale starts to luff first (or your upper leech is too far from the spreaders or shrouds) you need to move your lead forward. If the lower telltales luff first (or your upper leech hits the shrouds long before the foot gets near the shrouds) you need to move the lead block aft.

To some extent, this will vary with wind conditions. Usually the leech of the sail stretches more than the foot so as the wind builds you generally need to move the blocks forward a little. At some point when the boat becomes overpowered, you then need to move the leads aft so that you open the upper leech and reduce heeling.

In terms of your mainsail, you should add telltales at the aft end of the batten pockets (sometimes these are added just below the batten to keep them from hanging up on the stitching). When your mainsail is trimmed properly, there should be airflow at the trailing edge of the sail at all the battens. In light air this typically means that the traveler is pulled all the way to windward, and the mainsheet adjusted so that the boom placed roughly on the centerline of the boat. You should sight up your boom from below to see that the upper batten is roughly parellel with the boom, and that the aft tip is not pointing to windward.

As the wind builds, the traveler is lowered and the mainsheet, halyard, and outhaul tightened. Again, only to the point that flow is maintained so that the telltale on the upper batten is flying and the batten does not point to windward. In heavy going the traveler can be dropped to the face of the leeward seat and the mainsheet, halyard, and outhaul really tightened to 'blade-out' the sail.

Jeff
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Last edited by Jeff_H; 07-07-2010 at 08:24 AM.
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