Look at this gelcoat condition, please - SailNet Community

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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance
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  #1  
Old 07-19-2010
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Last edited by moonie5961; 10-29-2011 at 10:42 AM.
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Old 07-19-2010
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A friennd of mine had his boat re-gelcosted instead of painted. I never heard of that being done. It was done in Trinidad and cost less than Awlgrip.
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Old 07-19-2010
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I'd say the dark spots are blister divots that have been repaired with a filler. Interlux Watertite sets up pea green/purple. If the stuff is all solid and dry, my experience is...leave it alone. If the boat was in the water for a season, and you cannot see any evidence of active blistering, roll on a few coats of Interprotect just as a base for fairing, paint and go.
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Old 07-20-2010
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Moonie

having had a few old boats, I think you are seeing "old" barnacle attach marks...sometimes the scrape and paint is not as good as it should be, and although the barnacle is no longer there, the "adhesive" they use causes a different surface for the subsequent layers of paint to adhere/not adhere...a little old age, a little mildrew/water trapped, a little bottom paint from the 70's and 80's and back then we used some weird colored primers and surfacers to try and get the bottom paint to stick better...

looks pretty good for a boat that age...
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Old 07-20-2010
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I seem to remember having a bottom job once where the yard used a purple primer for some "New" bottom paint that was supposed to be very good. I can't actually remember if it was or not. I don't remember keeping the boat long enough to find out.

Boats of that age used very thick gel coat which would get air bubbles and pop off leaving a shallow depression which would get filled with bottom paint or primer or?

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Old 07-20-2010
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Well, obviously pictures aren't as handy as seeing the boat directly, but it looks like maybe some of the crazing isn't crazing so much as scratch marks. Maybe you used an agressive-grit sandpaper? Or a slightly beat-up scraper? I've never cleaned bottom paint - especially through a layer or two of barrier coat - and not scraped up the bottom a fair bit. I'm sure I'm not saying anything you don't already know when I suggest that crazing usually occurs around stress points - fittings, chines, 'grounding surfaces', etc. But it looks like you've got marks all over the place, which suggests that not all of it is crazing.

So if a some or most of those scratch marks aren't crazing, then it's not such a mysterious situation.. you simply have a quasi-pockmarked hull that's been filled with all sorts of things over it's life. Different coloured things.

If delamination is your concern, there are some pretty sophisticated tools that can measure such things. But from what I see, there's nothing to suggest any significant issues. In my experience, if the gelcoat is compromised, it's not difficult to peel away the damaged areas with a fingernail. I don't see anything like that going on here.

Additionally, since you sanded down to the fiberglass in some areas (I assume those areas are/were areas where there was some questionable 'stuff' going on) and didn't see any opaqueness from non-wetted glass, I hesitate to get excited.

I would take another look around, see if there are any obvious damage spots. If not, I'd simply sand, put on a healthy barrier coat, a good thick (extra coat or two) of ablative, and smile about the fine, fine hull you've got.
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Old 07-20-2010
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Crazing and pox and glecoat aside...It sure LOOKS like the patchwork quilt of previous repairs and coatings. If what you have is solid (not gooey, no loose) and looks stable, I'd say to clean it, prep it, apply a couple or three layers of barrier coat and then the topcoats of your choice.

You could also try emailing maximum-detail pictures to a couple of the companies that make epoxies and barrier coats and blister repairs, asking them if any of the colors or work seem familiar to them. (WTF, they won't charge you for it.)
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