Cored deck soft spot repair - Page 5 - SailNet Community

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  #41  
Old 05-20-2011
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Morgan 33 O.I. Perryville
 
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Scotch, clear, Packing Tape does a great job of removing the glass slivers from your hide. Just make a loop of it around your hand, sticky side out, and roll it down your arms. You'll probably lose a few arm hairs in the process as well.

As for the drill and fill process, I'll let you know how things are progressing. I hope to get the Morgan back next week, and I'll be running a hydro-meter over the repair areas to see if they dried out or not. I'll let you know.

Gary
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  #42  
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One method of re-coring is to remove the bottom laminate and core from the underside. This leaves the deck non-skid intact. Yes, upside down laminating is not pleasant, but can be done.

After removing the old core from underneath, you can replace it with Balsa or any other core. Core materials are very light and with epoxy, heavily thickened with fumed silica (Cabosil/Aerosil), it is not difficult to stick the new core to the old top laminate. For large areas, you can do a square foot or several square feet at a time and prop in place, if necessary, with a thin sheet of plwood, waxed or covered with Visqueen.

After the thickened epoxy has set up but is not fully cured, laminate over the new core with at least two layers of 1708. 1708 is a biaxial with a stitch mat(no binders). Wet out the semi-cured new core with a good amount of epoxy using a 4" or 7" roller, then apply the glass, wetting out the glass and keeping it in place till saturated. Once fully wet out it will stay in place and not come off. Just in case, keep an eye on it and be ready to catch it before it sags.

One more tip, for better wet out, heat your resin before mixing. I have successfully laminated with US Composites epoxy heated to as high as 120F. I use a cheapo digital meat thermometer, stuck into the epoxy jug.

Obviously, this type of repair only is applicable to boats with a removable headliner.

Last edited by pmcguire; 05-20-2011 at 08:18 PM.
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Old 05-20-2011
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Thanks for the tip about getting fiberglass out of my hide. Sounds like the little lint rollers I use to get cat hair off my clothe!! I'll put one in the toolbox. Thanks!!
I look forward to your posts as to the result of your repair.
Christine
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  #44  
Old 05-20-2011
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Working from underneath seems very unpleasant.
I think it would be less time consuming than refinishing the top though.
I don't think I have a removable headliner.
I might still be able to cut from the underside. OH that would just be so much fun.
Thanks for taking the time to explain the process. It sounds like it would work very well and might be the way to go for a smaller repair.
Christine
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Old 05-23-2011
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Just out of coureosity, has anyone thought of or used the styrofoam insulation panels rather than plywood or balsa? My guess is it would be as strong as balsa, not so much with plywood. But it would never absorb any more water and would be much easier to form to the cavity.

I've made plug molds with it using west system epoxy so the chemicals shouldn't dissolve the panel.

John
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Old 05-23-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jfdubu View Post
Just out of coureosity, has anyone thought of or used the styrofoam insulation panels rather than plywood or balsa? My guess is it would be as strong as balsa, not so much with plywood. But it would never absorb any more water and would be much easier to form to the cavity.

I've made plug molds with it using west system epoxy so the chemicals shouldn't dissolve the panel.

John
Foam is used by some builders. While it doesn't rot, any water that gets in travels much easier and the area of delamination is much greater. The advantage to end grain balsa is that any water travels pretty slowly, confining the damage.
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  #47  
Old 05-23-2011
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Morgan 33 O.I. Perryville
 
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There was a recent article in one of the boating magazines pertaining to the use of various core materials, with balsa listed as the best wood because of its structural integrity being higher than marine plywood. The same article talked about teak V/S some of the new composite, faux-woods such as Trex, and others currently used for decking material. The biggest problem with any of this is the change in weight distribution over what the boat was originally designed for.

A number of small boat manufacturers, such as Boston Whaler, use a dense form of foam that injected between the inner and outer hulls. The foam is very adhesive, and delamination is extremely rare. For transoms, nearly all powerboat manufacturers have switched to using a honeycomb, fiberglass core that is incredibly strong, it is tightly adhered to the inner and outer hulls and weighs next to nothing. The beauty of this approach is that when screws, through-hulls, etc.. are inserted through the hull(s) if they spring a leak it's confined to one, small chamber and does not effect the rest of the hull.

Cheers,

Gary
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Old 01-22-2012
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Catalina's?????

It's disturbing that so many Catalina's seem to have this deck problem. My 42 Catalina also has a hollow spot. I first discovered it (only owned the boat a few months) when I was washing it and noticed a different tone, when the water hit the deck, in one spot. I'm going to use the technique outlined by travlineasy. wish me luck.
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  #49  
Old 01-22-2012
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Morgan 33 O.I. Perryville
 
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It has been several months since I did the drill and fill. A couple weeks ago I had a local surveyor bring his hydro-meter to the marina and check the areas that were treated, and the adjacent areas. So far there is no indication of moisture intrusion and I hope the core remains dry. This nasty, winter weather will be the true test of time. If the core is still dry in early April, I'll be sanding the decks, removing most of the hardware and repainting everything above the hull to cabin joint. All of the fixtures will be rebedded and sealed before reattachment, then it's a summer of fun sailing before heading south to the Florida Keys in October.

Good Luck,

Gary
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  #50  
Old 01-22-2012
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Hey all,
Its good to see this thread still alive.... I started this thread a little over a year ago asking for advice on recoring the deck of my C-27. I posted pictures of the process in page 3 of this thread, and I used both the drill and fill method as well as the full blown recore with marine ply on two different areas. Everything's still solid, still haven't fixed my dang nonskid though.... Thanks for everyone's input!
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