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  #1  
Old 08-13-2010
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Preventer - An Interesting Solution

A mate of the Wombat's emailed me this link during the week. An interesting and very inexpensive preventer.

The cost of the thing is so low, around $20.00 for the Fader which is available from any climbing equipment supplier . . Everything else required I already have on board to at least make up a temporary rig to try it out.

Have a look here....

Sail-World.com : Permanently installed preventer: Another view
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Old 08-13-2010
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Thanks TDW. I have been pondering how to make up something for us. I am just concerned as to the force on the fig 8 and the tension required on the line. I'll let you know how I go with it.
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Old 08-13-2010
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Interesting solution, tdw. Thanks for passing that along. Do let us know how it works out.

I'm thinking of my chain plates and wondering how I'd secure one end of the line to one side and a block to the other. Then I'd have to install a padeye aft for the next block... and I'm not sure where, on our boat, I could put the cleat... I'd have to do it somewhat differently, and I'd have to buy some hardware in addition to the $13 figure eight, but it looks like one of the cleaner, less-expensive solutions I've seen.

Jim
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Old 08-14-2010
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Actually thats a cheap version of a boom-break, which is not adjustable. it would depend on the weight of the boom for it to work properly. it would never stop or even slow my 16' boom w/ 625 SF of sail.

And if you look closely at the line in the link you can see the damage that has already occur'd to the line.

.
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Old 08-14-2010
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I used something similar on my sailing boat. A preventer is very handy if you sail solo most of the time. Mine had not a break, but just two lines, rigged like those and brought to the back cleat.

The brake were the number of turns I have around the cleat (normally two was enough). If I wanted to change course downwind, I would have that line on one hand and the boom line on the other hand and with a help of the auto pilot, I could manage soft transitions. When I was sailing downwind I had it tight, fixed on the right cleat.

Regards

Paulo
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Old 08-15-2010
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DelmarRey .....Actually thats a cheap version of a boom-break, which is not adjustable. it would depend on the weight of the boom for it to work properly. it would never stop or even slow my 16' boom w/ 625 SF of sail.

And if you look closely at the line in the link you can see the damage that has already occur'd to the line.
Of course its a cheap version, thats what makes it interesting. Whether it actually works or not, only time will tell but a couple of points...

Sinabada is a Whiting 37' sloop, judging by the pics I'm guessing that her boom would have to be somewhere around 16'. The Womboat is only 34' so I'd think that if it works for them it will work for us.

According to the user, adjustment to the brake is achieved by tensioning or loosening the line.

The yacht in question is routinely flogged up and down the Australian coast from Tasmania to Queensland. It's quite possible of course that the line in question is far from new.

Quote:
SEMIJim Interesting solution, tdw. Thanks for passing that along. Do let us know how it works out.

I'm thinking of my chain plates and wondering how I'd secure one end of the line to one side and a block to the other. Then I'd have to install a padeye aft for the next block... and I'm not sure where, on our boat, I could put the cleat... I'd have to do it somewhat differently, and I'd have to buy some hardware in addition to the $13 figure eight, but it looks like one of the cleaner, less-expensive solutions I've seen.

Jim
$26.00 down here !! I figure that I can rig this as a test using stuff I have lying around already. If I'm happy with the result then I'll install a more permanent arrangement.

Interestingly enough Wichard have recently released this, which appears to work on the same principle.

http://www.wichard.com/fiche-A|WICHARD|7150-0203030000000000-ME.html



I'm hoping to get a trial set up next weekend.
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Old 08-17-2010
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In the video on the Wichard site, they show the boom in a jybe being slowed so that the impact of the jybe is softened, obviously a good thing. But if you're flying wing-on-wing, you're close to a jybe all the time. Would the idea be that you tighten the line so that the boom would be less likely to jybe in a momentary back-winded situation, giving the helmsman a chance to adjust without jybing?
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Old 08-17-2010
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Originally Posted by SEMIJim View Post
Interesting solution, tdw. Thanks for passing that along. Do let us know how it works out.

I'm thinking of my chain plates and wondering how I'd secure one end of the line to one side and a block to the other. Then I'd have to install a padeye aft for the next block... and I'm not sure where, on our boat, I could put the cleat... I'd have to do it somewhat differently, and I'd have to buy some hardware in addition to the $13 figure eight, but it looks like one of the cleaner, less-expensive solutions I've seen.

Jim
Jim,
If you couldn't attach to your chain plates how about your toe rail ? Hard to tell from your pic but it looks aluminium ?

Having had a bit more of a look I'm figuring the entire setup should cost around $150.00. I'll still do a trial using old parts I already have so if it doesn't work I'll only have blown $26.00 plus some time...and hopefully not a boom
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Last edited by tdw; 08-17-2010 at 05:12 PM.
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Old 08-17-2010
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TDW thanks for posting, an excellent idea. I think I will give it a try and see how it works for me.


Quote:
Originally Posted by jbondy View Post
In the video on the Wichard site, they show the boom in a jybe being slowed so that the impact of the jybe is softened, obviously a good thing. But if you're flying wing-on-wing, you're close to a jybe all the time. Would the idea be that you tighten the line so that the boom would be less likely to jybe in a momentary back-winded situation, giving the helmsman a chance to adjust without jybing?
jbondy I am wondering the same thing, my thought would be(about 10 seconds worth of thinking ) to apply enough tension to the rope to allow the boom to jibe under heave load. But, as you suggest, to hold the boom in place under temporary back winding.

Thoughts anyone?
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Old 08-17-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tdw View Post
Jim,
If you couldn't attach to your chain plates how about your toe rail ? Hard to tell from your pic but it looks aluminium ?
On our boat? Abracadabra? Her "toe rail" is molded into the deck. She doesn't have those handy-dandy perforated aluminum toe rails--and more's the pity.

But... come to think of it, there is a pair of wossname... padeyes, or maybe more properly they're just bails, just outside the chainplates:



I'd have to see if they're backed with anything. And I really have no feel for how much force they'd have to handle. I believe they were probably put there by the PO for twings, which wouldn't have to handle near the force.

Jim
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