Fore Stay and bottom paint - SailNet Community

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  #1  
Old 08-16-2010
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Question Fore Stay and bottom paint

Ok, I have two questions at this point. (more will follow I'm sure) I am working towards getting my Newport 30 floating by fall. Mainly because the guy that owns the trailer it is sitting on wants to haul his boat out to paint the bottom. I will be sailing on an inland lake and I am at the least confused about what type of paint to use. I will have access to the trailer in the future for repainting but don't want to do that every year.

Question 1. What type of paint should I use for an inland lake that is prone to grow a brown slime on anything that sits still for too long?

Question 2. Upon inspection of the rigging, I found that the fore stay has 2 strands have been cut and are missing for about 3 feet. I am a journeyman Ironworker and know that if this were rigging on the job it would not be taken out of service if only 2 wires were cut in 1 lay. ( 5 in 1 lay is the rule but that is using 6 x 19 IWRC rope NOT 1x 19 like I think this is) So that being said, replace now or take it easy for a while and replace later? Also, any recommendations as to where to order said stay from?

Thanks in advance for any info and I may be slow to respond to any questions.

Taver
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Old 08-16-2010
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Yes, you need to replace your forestay. I would recommend taking it off and sending it to RiggingOnly in Fairhaven, MA, and having them send you a replacement.

I would recommend using Hydrocoat or some other Petitt ablative paint. However, it really depends on what bottom paint you have on the boat currently. Without knowing what is on the bottom, it is hard to suggest what to use. If it is a hard epoxy paint, you can probably go with an ablative with little risk, but if it is an ablative, you'll need a compatible paint.
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Old 08-17-2010
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I am in the process of sanding the bottom down to bare glass. There are several shallow divits where barnacles were and I am going to fair them with awlgrip or something similar. I was thinking of using an epoxy primer unless there is a better way. I am not sure if I need to go all the way to bare glass on one side because it is not pitted at all. There are 3 layers of paint on the bottom: Top coat sands off very easily (a lot of it came off with a pressure washer), the middle coat is the same color (sorta) and a little tougher but not too bad, the base coat is white and hard as heck to sand. Any thoughts, suggestions, or helpful hints?
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Old 08-17-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ironworker View Post
I am in the process of sanding the bottom down to bare glass. There are several shallow divits where barnacles were and I am going to fair them with awlgrip or something similar. I was thinking of using an epoxy primer unless there is a better way. I am not sure if I need to go all the way to bare glass on one side because it is not pitted at all. There are 3 layers of paint on the bottom: Top coat sands off very easily (a lot of it came off with a pressure washer), the middle coat is the same color (sorta) and a little tougher but not too bad, the base coat is white and hard as heck to sand. Any thoughts, suggestions, or helpful hints?
Umm... you might want to do a bit more research and reading.... AWLGRIP is a topsides/cabintop paint, not a fairing compound. Fairing anything with a two-part polyurethane paint is a really laborious and expensive process. What you want to fair with is thickened epoxy, like West Systems Six10 epoxy.

The top coat is probably an ablative paint...and as such would come off very easily. The middle coat may be a hard epoxy paint or more of the ablative. The base coat is probably gelcoat.... might be a barrier coating, but I doubt it.

After fairing the bottom using thickened epoxy, either West Systems Six10 or better yet, epoxy from epoxyproducts.com thickened with colloidial fumed silica, you'll probably want to give the boat a good barrier coating, especially in any places you got down to bare glass, before bottom painting.

For barrier coating, I generally recommend Interprotect 2000E. I wrote a guide to applying it a while back. Get both the grey and white to make your life simpler.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
Alternating the colors helps a lot with determining where you've painted, but it is also very useful for helping you coat the areas around the boat stands. For instance:

The first layer is gray, since the gelcoat is white, and you can paint right up to the boat stand pads. Then you paint a layer of white, and leave about a two-inch margin of gray paint around the pads... then paint a layer a gray and leave a four-inch margin around the pads or about two-inches of white and two inches of gray showing...and then finish with a layer of white—with a six-inch margin around the pads—with two inches of gray, two inches of white and two inches of gray.

Then when you move the boat stands, you can fill in the pads and layer the paint accordingly... adding gray to cover the white square left by the pad.. then white to cover the gray square, and so on.

Also, by alternating colors, you can see if someone has sanded through the barrier coat when you're prepping the boat for re-painting. If there's an area that is gray or grayish, they've sanded through at least the outermost layer of barrier coat. If you had all white, you wouldn't be able to tell if they had sanded down through the barrier coat as easily—if you had all gray, you could tell they sanded through the barrier coat...but not if they've sanded into it...

I hope this helps clear things up a bit.
Then bottom paint. Depending on where you keep the boat, how you sail it, and how you'll store it, will have a lot of bearing on what paint to use.
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Last edited by sailingdog; 08-17-2010 at 04:30 PM.
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Old 08-17-2010
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Fair it with bondo ( polyester resin putty) can use epoxy if you want to and paint the bottom with Interlux VC17, it's nice and smooth and hard as hell, nothing will stick to it and it will last a long long time. Forestay on a 30' boat I'd probably replace it even though you could pick the whole boat up with it the way it is. Too risky to lose the mast over something cheap to replace.
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Don't use BONDO for fairing a boat. It can and does absorb water... and that can become a problem for you later on.

As for using VC17... unless you store the boat in the water year round, it isn't a very good choice. It isn't a multi-season paint.
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her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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Old 08-17-2010
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I thought awlfair and typed awlgrip. I was wondering if epoxy and a filler like silica would be just as well. I will be keeping the boat in the water year round on an inland lake. I do like the 2 color approach for the barrier coats. Do I need to just sand down to the white layer and go from there or continue like I am doing? I did read in several places not to use bondo and hadn't given it a thought. If I can find the camera I will get a photo if it will help.
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Old 08-17-2010
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Dog's advice is good. Use thickened epoxy to fair. Barrier coats are epoxy based. If the white layer is gelcoat and it is in good shape you don't have to remove it though.
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Old 08-17-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
Don't use BONDO for fairing a boat. It can and does absorb water... and that can become a problem for you later on.

As for using VC17... unless you store the boat in the water year round, it isn't a very good choice. It isn't a multi-season paint.
VC17m is fine for boats that are seasonally moored in the water and hauled for the winter so long as you DON'T paint the bottom after hauling out in the fall. Like SD says, don't use it if you're storing the boat out of water. Paint in the spring, and slash. Repaint every season. One thing to know about VC 17 for anyone interested is that the teflon content makes it nearly impossible to paint with anything else unless you do a complete bottom peel. Sanding down to gel coat won't get rid of the teflon residue... this eventually lead to trouble if you want to do something else. I had fantasy about going with Balto Plate, but figured we could haul annually and continue with VC 17 for a decade before we'd even cover the cost of a peel job.
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Old 08-18-2010
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Whatever, if you want to be snobby and pay more use a Marine fairing compound like Polyfair 26. Assume he's talking about fairing up some surface dings, not structural defects in the hull.
We sail on the river and get about 5 years out of VC17, works great no slime sticks to it, we haul out every year after about 3-4 months in the water.
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