Suggestions for polishing Gelcoat at the dock? - SailNet Community
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 11 Old 08-25-2010 Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
dhays's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: University Place, WA
Posts: 626
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 5
 
Suggestions for polishing Gelcoat at the dock?

My new-to-me boat arrived at the yard yesterday and should be put in the water Friday afternoon. The boat is in pretty good shape, only being 5 years old. However, it spent those 5 years in SoCal so there is a bit of UV induced oxidation on the hull. I frankly wouldn't be concerned about it, but it is obvious when the old vinyl lettering is removed.

The problem is that the boat yard won't allow any washing, polishing, waxing of the hull. The environmental regulations are tough enough and the yard cheap enough, that they simply won't allow it unless you are paying them to do the work and then also pay to have the water treated and disposed of.

So, I'm stuck until I get to boat to the dock. The problem is that while I can easily wash the boat at the dock, polishing and then waxing the hull will be a real pain. I can do just the area when the old name was, but then I'll have some really shiny areas on the hull surrounded by just clean areas.

Any suggestions on what others have done in the past?

47*20'11.7" N
122*35'20.8" W
S/V Legacy, Catalina 400 MkII, Hull #328
My Blog on
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
dhays is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 11 Old 08-25-2010
Senior Member
 
tommays's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 4,295
Thanks: 1
Thanked 30 Times in 30 Posts
Rep Power: 7
 
I have never used much water other than to keep the pad from getting dry ?

I dont see how you can compound the boat in the water as its a good bit of work even with the correct machine

1970 Cal 29 Sea Fever

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

1981 J24 Tangent 2930
Tommays
Northport NY


If a dirty bottom slows you down what do you think it does to your boat
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
tommays is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #3 of 11 Old 08-25-2010
Telstar 28
 
sailingdog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,290
Thanks: 0
Thanked 14 Times in 12 Posts
Rep Power: 14
         
Polishing and waxing the boat in the water is really a PITA... since you can't really use power tools, unless you have air tools.

Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
sailingdog is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #4 of 11 Old 08-25-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 149
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 5
 
Gotta love living in Louisiana. We use whatever chemicals we want and wash them directly into the water. In fact, whatever toxic leftover solutions I have, I just dump them into the water. We plumb our heads to empty directly into the water, etc. No one cares.
radioguy is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #5 of 11 Old 08-25-2010
Senior Member
 
night0wl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Fort Lauderdale
Posts: 1,454
Thanks: 0
Thanked 20 Times in 20 Posts
Rep Power: 10
 
I've done this dockside...and it is a pain. The important thing to do is to have a plan that breaks the boat into sections...then attack a section at a time.

Also, while this may be cheating, it has worked for me. I've found a wax that has some slight abrasives in it...and use that on an oxidized boat for a season or two...like Meguires Flagship. After a couple of seasons, I switched to pure Carnuba. Use the elbow grease/hand method...mist the wax application & take-off to ease the effort.

S/V Jendai
Beneteau 343
night0wl is online now  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #6 of 11 Old 08-25-2010
Senior Member
 
14432's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 195
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 9
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by radioguy View Post
Gotta love living in Louisiana. We use whatever chemicals we want and wash them directly into the water. In fact, whatever toxic leftover solutions I have, I just dump them into the water. We plumb our heads to empty directly into the water, etc. No one cares.
I hope you're joking
14432 is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #7 of 11 Old 08-25-2010
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Posts: 8
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
 
I recommend you be extremely careful using electric polishers, etc. while she's in the water. My brother did that a number of years ago, slipped and touch water and was electrocuted! He lived but spent weeks in the hospital and now has a bad heart!

Here in Maine (you can do it too in Washington), if we have to work on the boat when it's in the water, we tie her to a dock that shoals (goes dry) on the low tide and work on it then. If I were you, I would find another yard. There's got to be a way to wax your boat in the yard,
crossbowme is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #8 of 11 Old 08-25-2010
Courtney the Dancer
 
jrd22's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: San Juan Islands., WA, USA
Posts: 3,883
Thanks: 4
Thanked 22 Times in 21 Posts
Rep Power: 15
 
I agree with the above post, either find another yard or pay the yard you are in to compound,polish and wax it. Been there, done that, will never do it again.

John
SV Laurie Anne

1988 Brewer 40 Pilothouse

jrd22 is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #9 of 11 Old 08-25-2010
Junior member, rest old
 
msmith10's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Columbus Ohio
Posts: 495
Thanks: 3
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
 
I paid my yard to compound and wax my hull this spring and was surprised at how inexpensive it was. I paid about $400 to do the hull. I paid another $400 to do the topsides (rub rail up) which I won't do again because that is something that's easy to do (gravity isn't working against you) and you can use power tools there. I'll never do the hull myself again.

Mark Smith
1977 C&C 30 Mk 1 hailing from Port Clinton, Ohio
msmith10 is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #10 of 11 Old 08-26-2010
Telstar 28
 
sailingdog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,290
Thanks: 0
Thanked 14 Times in 12 Posts
Rep Power: 14
         
I'd point out that doing it yourself isn't so difficult if you follow Maine Sail's excellent directions. Most yard workers don't have a clue how to properly clean, polish and wax a hull. Most also use inferior materials and supplies that will prematurely age your hull in the long run.

I'd also point out that the TOPSIDES is the hull from the waterline to the deck...not just the section above the rubrail.

Quote:
Originally Posted by msmith10 View Post
I paid my yard to compound and wax my hull this spring and was surprised at how inexpensive it was. I paid about $400 to do the hull. I paid another $400 to do the topsides (rub rail up) which I won't do again because that is something that's easy to do (gravity isn't working against you) and you can use power tools there. I'll never do the hull myself again.

Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.

Last edited by sailingdog; 08-26-2010 at 01:01 AM.
sailingdog is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.


User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome