lazy jacks - Page 2 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance
 Not a Member? 
  #11  
Old 05-08-2003
Jeff_H's Avatar
Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: Annapolis, Md
Posts: 6,595
Thanks: 5
Thanked 96 Times in 72 Posts
Rep Power: 10
Jeff_H has a spectacular aura about Jeff_H has a spectacular aura about Jeff_H has a spectacular aura about
lazy jacks

Lazy jacks are a to each his own kind of thing. As someone who has sailed for over 40 years (time flies when you are having fun) and who single hands my 38 footer a lot, I find lazy jacks a real pain in the butt and a bit of a safety hazard for a singlehander. If I bought a boat with lazyjacks they would be first thing that I would remove. (Come to think of it I did buy a boat with lazyjacks and they were the first things that were not reinstalled when we stepped the mast). Then again I would not own a Lord Nelson on a bet either, so, what the heck, to each his own.

Jeff
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #12  
Old 05-08-2003
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 56
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 13
pblais is on a distinguished road
lazy jacks

My lazy jacks are on halyards so I can tighten or loosen them. With a full batten main I loosen the jacks and pull them back behind the winches to hoist the main and avoid battens hung in the jack lines. I was on a small Hunter last week that fouled the battens real easy. ven at that it was not toodifficult to have the right touch to get the main up. Without batten cars it didn''t come down all that easy but did contain the main from laying all over the boat.

Going down is no problem at all. With batten cars and lazy jacks if you lower the main she is going down straight and fast. That is really nice.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #13  
Old 05-08-2003
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Posts: 360
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 13
928frenzy is on a distinguished road
lazy jacks

JeffH:
You usually provide good advice on many sailing topics, but I think your remark about "Lord Nelson" boats was uncalled for.

It''s ok by me that you don''t care for them, but your remark seems to imply that they are "bad" boats. I (and many others) do not think they are "bad" boats. They are indeed heavy, but they are solidly built, and have a very nice motion in a seaway. They were built to be used as passage-makers, and for that (I think) they are ideally suited.

They may not win many races, but those who sail them can rest assured they''ll arrive wherever they intend to go, even if it takes a bit longer. When I think of comparing a heavy boat to a lighter one, I think of the "Tortoise and the Hare" story.

~ Happy sails to you. ~ _/) ~
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #14  
Old 05-08-2003
Jeff_H's Avatar
Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: Annapolis, Md
Posts: 6,595
Thanks: 5
Thanked 96 Times in 72 Posts
Rep Power: 10
Jeff_H has a spectacular aura about Jeff_H has a spectacular aura about Jeff_H has a spectacular aura about
lazy jacks

I think that your point is well taken about my comment on the Lord Nelson''s. My comment was only intended to illustrate that we all have our own ideas about what works best for each of us or what suits our tastes. It was not intended as a wholesale slam on Lord Nelson''s nor were my comments intended to suggest that I think the Lord Nelsons are inherently "bad boats''.

Just for the record, the reason that I would not own a Lord Nelson on a dare has little to do with the Lord Nelson''s speed or lack there of. My dislike of the Lord Nelsons center more on certain construction and design decisions which I personally consider to be ''deal breakers'' in terms of being unacceptable to me.

I also consider the Lord Nelson''s roll and pitch patterns to be a very uncomfortable pattern to me and one that I personally would never choose to take offshore. This like or dislike of certain roll and pitch patterns is another matter very much subject to opinion and taste.

I would like to explain why I believe that roll or pitch motion comfort is subjective. One of the items that came out of US Navy research on motion sickness is that various individuals tolerate motion in different manners. There are two factors that control motion comfort, 1)speed or accelleration during the roll or pitch cycle and 2) the angle through which the vessel moves. They found that a near equal amount of people who tolerate quicker accelerations really can''t handle large roll or pitch angles and that others can handle large roll or pitch angles but can''t tolerate quicker motions and then there are still other people who can''t tolerate either.

Boats like the Lord Nelsons tend to roll or pitch more slowly but through a wider angle than would be expected in a lighter boat with a lower VCG. To many that slower motion is a more comfortable roll or pitch motion. But many, like myself, personally find these wider roll angles to be a less comfortable roll and pitching motion and at least in my case is one that really grinds me down quickly compared to the slightly quicker motions of a properly designed modern boat. Furthermore, some of the better modern designs not only roll and pitch through narrower angles, but because of their very low vertical center of gravity and carefully designed roll and pitch dampening characteristics also roll and pitch more slowly as well. In fairness, because of their lighter weight these modern designs do tend to have faster heave speeds but comparatively speaking in a general sense heave tends to be an inherently slower motion anyway.

I apologize, that after rereading my comments, it would appear that they could easily be construed to imply that the Lord Nelsons are inherently bad boats. They are not.

Respectfully,
Jeff
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #15  
Old 05-13-2003
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Posts: 339
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 12
jbanta is on a distinguished road
lazy jacks

Still, if any one has a list of parts and matierals for a retractable set of Lazy Jacks I am still intrested. $50 sounds like a pretty good deal..
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #16  
Old 05-14-2003
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Posts: 360
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 13
928frenzy is on a distinguished road
lazy jacks

I don''t have the Lazy Jack plans right in front of me, so forgive me if I leave anything out that may be important.

First, you''ll have to decide just how far up the mast the top line will be connected or drawn through a block. In my case, I''ll probably connect 1/4" line to eyes screwed into the mast on each side 25'' up. Those lines will be about 15'' in length, and on the end of each of line will be a single small block. I''ll likely put a continuous length of 1/4'' line through the blocks to form the inverted "V" on the boom. That line will about 50'' in total length, as it has to go up, down, and around the boom twice. I''ll probably install a hook (facing aft) about 3'' on the bottom and from the end of the boom. I''ll probably install an eye about 4'' from the front end of the boom on on each side of the boom. Lastly, I''ll probably install a cleat that will be used to keep the system taught when in use. When the system is not needed, I''ll just slacken the line on the cleat, and move it forward of the boom, then tighten it again, and sinch it up tight on the cleat. If I''ve left anything out, I''ll get additional hardware (like more hooks or cleats) as the need arises.

Anyway, so far the list of hardware is comprised of 4 eyes, 2 small single blocks, 1 small hook, and 1 medium cleat. Lastly, it looks like I''ll need about 80'' of 1/4" line. Based on this list, I estimate the total cost to be about $50.

~ Happy sails to you ~ _/) ~
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #17  
Old 05-14-2003
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Posts: 360
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 13
928frenzy is on a distinguished road
lazy jacks

Now that I''m looking at my Lazy Jack plans I''ve revised the previous message to the one below.

First, you''ll have to decide just how far up the mast the top line will be connected or drawn through a block. In my case, I''ll probably connect 1/4" or 5/16" or perhaps 3/8" line to eyes screwed into the mast on each side about 25'' up. Each of those lines will be about 15'' in length, and on the end of each of line will be a single small block. I''ll likely put a continuous length of the line (probably the same size) through the blocks to form the inverted "V" on the boom. That line will be about 50'' in total length, as it has to go up, down, and around the boom. I''ll probably use a medium sized cleat for to hold fast the open ends of that line. That cleat will go onto the boom about 4'' from the aft end, but clear of the main sheet. I''ll install hooks (facing forward) on either side of the boom about 4'' from the front end of the boom, but clear of the boom-vang. When the system is not needed, I''ll just slacken the line on the rear cleat, and move the lines forward of the boom, then tighten it again, and sinch it up tight, probably on another cleat that I will install on the mast below the boom. If I''ve left anything out, I''ll get additional hardware (like more hooks or cleats) as the need arises.

Anyway, so far the list of hardware is comprised of 2 eyes, 2 small single blocks, 2 small hook, and 2 medium cleats. Lastly, it looks like I''ll need about 80'' of the line. Based on this list, I estimate the total cost to be about $50.

~ Happy sails to you ~ _/) ~
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #18  
Old 07-04-2006
mdriscol's Avatar
Good Crew
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: New England
Posts: 3
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
mdriscol is on a distinguished road
Thumbs up Joining In

Quote:
Originally Posted by 928frenzy
To each their own. However, I''ve a friend who''s been sailing for about 20 years. Since he sails single-handed quit often, he decided to install a Lazy Jack system. He told me it was one of the least expensive and most useful modifications he''s made to his Lord Nelson.

Considering that the cost for all the material will be about $50, I can''t see how I can go wrong installing Lazy Jacks. ;^)

~ Happy sails to you ~ _/) ~
I don't see how you could go wrong for that money either. It's rare that one can do anything on a boat for that!
I'd love to make lazy jacks for my pocket cruiser, Lilliput. When she's in the water(not this season) I usually sail her alone. I've crewed on offshore deliveries and my experience with lazy jacks was positive. Can you steer me to the directions for them.
I've just discovered these forums, tho' I've belonged to SailNet for several years. Going to be a frequent visitor from now on!

Enjoy the short season.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #19  
Old 07-04-2006
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 288
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
FrankLanger is on a distinguished road
Jeff, please provide comment on lazy jack systems....

Jeff, I have always appreciated your posts, even if you sometimes express strong and personal opinions. You did clarify your comment on the Lord Nelson boats (interesting), but for purposes of this post, I am also interested in why you dislike lazy jacks--I recently purchased a 30 foot boat, without lazy jacks, and have been encouraged by others to install them as I do alot of single handing. I do have concerns about them interfering with the mainsail--both when raising the sail, but more importantly, when I want to let the main out on a broad reach. Therefore, I have not bought them, though I do find my mainsail hard to flake and manage on my own. Any comments to help me decide?
thanks,
Frank.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #20  
Old 07-04-2006
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
I, personally, like having lazy jacks, as it makes it far easier for me to drop the main and reef or furl it. They can cause problems if you are trying to raise or lower the mainsail, and it has battens...but over all, I prefer to have them.
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Lazy Jack - how to use? cyrusallen Learning to Sail 4 09-24-2002 04:42 PM
putting boat on jacks jolly_mon Gear & Maintenance 1 01-24-2002 10:22 AM
Lazy Jacks?? maureena5 Gear & Maintenance 12 11-15-2001 10:29 AM
Ted Herman Lazy Jack duffer1960 General Discussion (sailing related) 0 11-02-2001 07:45 AM
Lazy Jack System Comparison sehopkins Gear & Maintenance 6 06-07-2001 08:02 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 06:37 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.