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  #21  
Old 07-04-2006
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I may be selling mine since I am ordering a stack pack which will come with a new lazy jack set. Let me know if you are interested.
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  #22  
Old 07-04-2006
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If the elusive half knot is what you seek, then lazy jacks are not for you. If ease of handling the main is, then lazy jacks do the trick. On my previous boat, a Hunter 26 I had lazy jacks with a full batten main. To keep from having the battens catch when raising, I would loosen them, then tie them off in front of the mast before leaving the dock. Then tighten them back up to lower. On my current boat, I have a Doyle StackPack, as well as the StrongTrack system instead of battcars. Again, a full batten main. As long as you're pointing into the wind, the sail goes right up without catching the battens. And with the StrongTrack, comes down easily and cleanly. Much simpler system than battcars.

As a singlehander, I find the lazy jacks to be a big plus. They aren't for everyone though, and if not well installed, can more of a hindarance than help. The biggest problem with having them, is you need to modify the sailcover.

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  #23  
Old 07-04-2006
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ONe other thing...the equipment required for lazy jacks are:

1/4" line
2 Eyestraps or blocks for the mast
2 cleats for the mast
2 or 3 eyestraps for the boom, depending on whether you want two legs or three on the lazyjacks
2 or 4 stainless steel rings

Make sure the main line for each set is long enough that you can loosen them and lead the lazyjacks forward to the mast, to make raising the sails easier.
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  #24  
Old 07-04-2006
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the tension on lazy jacks can be run back to the cockpit, so that they can be slacked when hoisting the main. I did ours fomr scratch and I think it cost about $30Australian. The coolest aspect of the home made version I have is that the line that normaly just runs vertically down the mast in commercial models is the inner jackline in my system, so for the most part the things are self tensioning. A few other little details that work in with the boat's peculiarities and my own preferences make the system just right. Having intalled a kit for a friend's boat, I much prefer just buying the bits you need and doing it from scratch.

Sasha
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  #25  
Old 07-05-2006
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I made my own using only line and a couple of SS eyes. My lazy jacks do not retract, and this has not been a problem. The way I installed my lazy jacks was keeping it simple. I ran a line around the mast over the top of the spreaders and brought each end to within 30" above the boom at its midpoint. Tied a bowline at each end. Then I tied a line to the bowline and went under the boom thru an eye that I installed and back up to the other side to the other bowline and terminated that line. I did this two more times so that I ended up with 3 triangles, alongside the lenght of the boom. The lines are not tight but relatively slack. I have been doing this now for 5 years with no problems.
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Old 07-06-2006
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Just a couple of points:

Try have hardware that won't chafe the sails because you don't want to loosen the leeward lines too much and that generally means they will be against the sail. Little pulleys will probably feel better to work with but stainless eyes present less chafe.

I always put the boat head to wind when hoisting the main and the only time the lazy jacks interfere with the battens is if there is a solid blow and the leech flaps around a bit.

Construct the lazy jacks so that the general line of the back lines kind of follows the shape of the leech and about two feet in. Use three triangles to achieve this if you must. The further down the boom you can support the bunt of the sail, the better.

The leeward lines should never interfere with the boom when running off the wind (FrankLanger) because they obviously move with the boom. If they tend to go a little tighter, loosen them.

And the comment (I think Jeff?) that jackstays are not so great for single handers, the first pair I fitted for single handing after years of sailing without them had me wondering why I hadn't done this years ago. I'd never sail without them again.

Last edited by Omatako; 07-06-2006 at 06:48 AM.
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Old 07-06-2006
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lazyjacks or jackstays? There is a difference. Lazyjacks are the lines that contain the main sail on the boom when you lower it. Jack stays or jack lines are the lines that you attach a safety harness tether to. I believe both are very useful on a shorthanded boat.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

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  #28  
Old 07-06-2006
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Here are the plans I used on my 26M. I modified them slightly,using quick clip caribiners on the lines to the upper blocks. I can disconnect the lines,bungee them to the reefing hook,and take up the slack of the bungee line on the boom wrapping around a cleat on the boom
http://www.macgregorsailors.com/cgi-...iew&record=298
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I also agree with just making them, it's easy, and be sure there easy to remove from the boom, while hoisting the main, I see so many sailors getting there sail hung buy the battons on them things, so get them out of the way before you raise the sail
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Old 07-06-2006
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Lazy Jacks

I made my own for about $50, and they work great. Do a search on the net and you will find several different sites that talk about installing them, and have pictures. I used the EZ Jacks that I saw at the Annapolis boat show last year as my model. (They have a website with some pictures, but that site is only moderately helpful.) I extend mine only for the purpose of lowering the sail. When I moor, I fold them along the boom and mast out of the way, they don't interfere with sailing, and they aren't needed for any other purpose. There is no need to modify the sail cover.
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