Paint for inside and outside - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance
 Not a Member? 
  #1  
Old 08-31-2010
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 9
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
kirbyc1 is on a distinguished road
Paint for inside and outside

What type of paint would yall recommend for the inside/outside of a sailboat? Im assuming some sort of epoxy based paint on the outside. But is this necessary on the inside? Thanks
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 09-01-2010
TQA's Avatar
TQA TQA is offline
Bombay Explorer 44
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 2,617
Thanks: 0
Thanked 49 Times in 45 Posts
Rep Power: 6
TQA is on a distinguished road
Paint choice is dependent on the substrate and likely UV exposure.

What you need for a steel boat in Oregon will be different to a mahogany boat in the Caribbean.

Epoxy based paint is not a good choice for an exterior topcoat as it has poor UV resistance.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 09-01-2010
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
A two-part linear polyurethane paint would be good for the exterior. The interior wouldn't need the durability of a two-part paint, so could use a one-part polyurethane paint. For the bilge, I'd recommend using Interprotect 2000E as a coating, since it is designed to be submersed and will fare far better in the conditions found in a bilge than regular paint.
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 09-02-2010
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 9
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
kirbyc1 is on a distinguished road
From what I understand, polyurethane smells horrible. This smell can last longer than it takes to cure, im assuming years? So why would anyone want to use it on the inside of their boat.

Is this smell only relevant during the application/first week or so of the painting process?
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 09-02-2010
TQA's Avatar
TQA TQA is offline
Bombay Explorer 44
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 2,617
Thanks: 0
Thanked 49 Times in 45 Posts
Rep Power: 6
TQA is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by kirbyc1 View Post
From what I understand, polyurethane smells horrible. This smell can last longer than it takes to cure, im assuming years? So why would anyone want to use it on the inside of their boat.

Is this smell only relevant during the application/first week or so of the painting process?

As sailingdog says two part polyurethane on the exterior over 2 coats of hi build epoxy primer is the way to go; roll it on and tip off the final coats on polyurethane.

Interior is not so easy and you have a tradeoff. A water based one pot urethane paint will give you a reasonably dureable finish but there are reports that it can take a long time [months] before sensitive noses stop smelling "new paint". But it is easy to patch paint if required.

If I use a classic varnish like Epithanes on the inside of my boat I have to sleep upwind of the varnish for a week to 10 days. As I am sensitised to the VOC elements . I can get away with a shorter period with a one pot paint such as Epithanes monourethane.

If you can try and pick a time when you have low humidity as this will speed the dissipation of the volatile elements which cause the smell problems.

.Moving the boat to Arizona if you live in Florida.

Quote:
A low-VOC paint will bother allergic or sensitive people less. Check the label; by law, the VOC will be listed. Volatile Organic Compounds are any ingredients in paint that evaporate into the air while the paint is drying. They can include hardeners and agents that keep the dried paint supple. Several companies have low- or zero-VOC paints, although the performance may not be as good as regular paint since this is fairly new technology. Odor is not an indicator of whether a paint is low or high VOC.
But a boat interior does tend to trap odours and the megayacht painters often run expensive dehumidifiers and airconditioning sets to get rid of the VOCs.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:00 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.