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  #11  
Old 12-17-2010
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If the plates are simple 'bar' and have no welding alterations, etc. then plain 316 will perform to the same level as 316L.

wkeenan - Just imitate the same shape and size of the OEM plates just change the materials and surface finish. If you have had 'failure' then of course you can increase the 'cross section' of the OEM plates. Dont totally reinvent the wheel, just make the old wheel 'better' - small steps of improvement.
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Old 12-18-2010
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You have just joined a large group of concerned sailors who are in the same situation. Early versions of the Island Packet yachts were plagued with corrosion problems in their chain plates as was a lot of the older Hinkleys. Many manufacturers use this method of fiberglassing the chain plate weldment into the laminate of the hull. Contact the owners association of these boats. I am sure there will be plenty of interesting solutions to chose from. I prefer being able to inspect them visually, either through external mounting to the hull or bulkhead mounted chain plates. Also consider hull liner/tie rod installations, ie: Beneteau, Catalina, Hunter and other manufacturers using interior grid/liner construction. Consider and get quotes for the repair before making an offer. Your surveyor will advise you to the extent these repairs may take.
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Old 12-19-2010
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Interesting little story about stainless steels. This week we got back a wastewater RO filtration unit from a customer. All the stainless on this unit was 316. The sch 40 piping was welded and not subsequently finished in any way. It was all quite corroded at all the welds. The filter canister was a bead blasted finish, and eaten completely through in several places! The high pressure Can pump had an electropolish finish, and was still bright and shiny everywhere. Interestingly, the hot dip galvanized frame still looked great! I don't know what they were processing, but it sure raised hell with stainless steel.

Gary H. Lucas
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Old 12-19-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GaryHLucas View Post
Interesting little story about stainless steels. This week we got back a wastewater RO filtration unit from a customer. All the stainless on this unit was 316. The sch 40 piping was welded and not subsequently finished in any way. It was all quite corroded at all the welds. The filter canister was a bead blasted finish, and eaten completely through in several places! The high pressure Can pump had an electropolish finish, and was still bright and shiny everywhere. Interestingly, the hot dip galvanized frame still looked great! I don't know what they were processing, but it sure raised hell with stainless steel.

Gary H. Lucas
Not surprised the bead blasted portion and welds got eaten up. Not surprised the electropolished stuff was in good shape. The irregular surface of the bead blasted areas encourage crevice corrosion and that's why it got eaten away so badly. IIRC, the welds tend to be more prone to corrosion because the alloy composition changes due to the high temperatures of the welding process, since the various components of the stainless steel alloy have different melting points. The increased corrosion can be reduced by using low carbon versions of the alloy, 316L, rather than 316.
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Do away with rust and corrosion

Quote:
Originally Posted by GaryHLucas View Post
Interesting little story about stainless steels. This week we got back a wastewater RO filtration unit from a customer. All the stainless on this unit was 316. The sch 40 piping was welded and not subsequently finished in any way. It was all quite corroded at all the welds. The filter canister was a bead blasted finish, and eaten completely through in several places! The high pressure Can pump had an electropolish finish, and was still bright and shiny everywhere. Interestingly, the hot dip galvanized frame still looked great! I don't know what they were processing, but it sure raised hell with stainless steel.

Gary H. Lucas
Not always is stainless welded with the exact same material as the base metal. Close to the same material is not good enough. Polishing the welds can deter external corrosion but not internal and as we know some steel boats rust from the inside out. Aluminum and stainless steel fuel, water and holding tanks rust and corrode from the inside out. Most commonly this rust and corrosion appears at the welded joints and especially where these tanks come in contact with foam insulation or rest on their mounts. In your customer's situation I would consider not just these conditions but also the dissimilar metals and especially if they are in contact with the galvanized mild steel framework. On my water maker I replaced every item I could with PVC, even making the filter chambers from 4" PVC pipe with end caps and reducers thus eliminating 99% of the corrosion problems with no adverse effects to the system.
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Even if the welds are made with the proper welding wire stock, the issue of corrosion at the welds still exists. Also, the suggestion of replacing the steel with PVC does very little good for the OP who is replacing CHAINPLATES, which are very high load items. PVC is not very strong.

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Originally Posted by CaptainJesse View Post
Not always is stainless welded with the exact same material as the base metal. Close to the same material is not good enough. Polishing the welds can deter external corrosion but not internal and as we know some steel boats rust from the inside out. Aluminum and stainless steel fuel, water and holding tanks rust and corrode from the inside out. Most commonly this rust and corrosion appears at the welded joints and especially where these tanks come in contact with foam insulation or rest on their mounts. In your customer's situation I would consider not just these conditions but also the dissimilar metals and especially if they are in contact with the galvanized mild steel framework. On my water maker I replaced every item I could with PVC, even making the filter chambers from 4" PVC pipe with end caps and reducers thus eliminating 99% of the corrosion problems with no adverse effects to the system.
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her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

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