Bandsaw trick, Well we don't have a woodworking forum! - SailNet Community
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post #1 of 19 Old 01-22-2011 Thread Starter
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Bandsaw trick, Well we don't have a woodworking forum!

Did a re-sawing trick today that I saw on one of the PBS woodworking shows It worked very well.

2.5 thick white oak junk wood, cut it just 6" wide, about 3' long. squared one edge...Needed help lifting this one!

Set table saw rip fence to 1.25 and ripped each edge of the board about 2" deep. (it's wet wood too)

Then took it to band-saw, without the re-saw guide, and the board on the squared edge. sliced it (very slow, it's only a 14" delta BS) right down the middle. result = 2 nicely book matched boards for free.

Denise, Bristol PA, Oday 30. On Tidal Delaware River, Anchor Yacht Club.
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post #2 of 19 Old 01-22-2011
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Cool, I like woodwork, gettting ready to build a wood steamer and jig for a project coming up

Gonna use a 36"x6" (maybe 4") dia sch. 40 PVC and a wagner wallpaper steam machine, that should maintain 200 degs long enough ( or longer ) to bend some 1x solid stock

1955 Blanchard 51 Custom ( I got a woody )

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post #3 of 19 Old 01-22-2011
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"Paint" the ends with wood glue so they don't split as it dries.

2 cents worth of free advice from a shop teacher.

Keep the expenses low and the good times high.

S/V Waitara
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post #4 of 19 Old 01-22-2011
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Thank you sir

1955 Blanchard 51 Custom ( I got a woody )

1974 Ranger 33


Lord, give me coffee to change the things I can change and Rum to accept the things I can't
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post #5 of 19 Old 01-22-2011
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Thanks for sharing this with us. The follow up responses were also good.
I'm a retired contractor in NH...Love info like this. I just got throuth working on a barn built in 1835 up heah.
I had the good fortune to be able to take some original timber for myself, mostly 4x4 and 2x12 stock.
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post #6 of 19 Old 01-23-2011
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Pappy and I replied at the same time -- the wood-glue-on-the-ends thing is to keep freshly cut, wet wood from splitting at the ends as it dries out. For steaming I'd think you'd want those ends open to soak in as much of the heat/moisture as you can. Another trick I learned from my wood shop mentor --- small pieces can be steam bent by soaking them in a bucket of water then microwaving them. Seriously. When soaking them sit a rock on them or something so they stay underwater for a day or so. Then pull them out and nuke. Play with the timing and power to get even heating, but it works great on small stuff.

Looks like Denise started a woodworking forum right here -- I'd love to learn more tricks like the one she shared. With the number of wooden boats and wood parts on boats I'm surprised there isn't more of this stuff here!

And Omaho, I was jealous of you for a minute then I felt better when I realized it's probably -10 degrees up there. It's a balmy 13 here.

I got a hold of some teak and made new hatch rails -- that stuff is wonderful. It's so oily it machines like plastic and didn't require sanding.

Keep the expenses low and the good times high.

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post #7 of 19 Old 01-23-2011 Thread Starter
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When we were building wood canvas canoes and restoring some I really got into steam bending. Ash used for stems in canoes steam bends very well. then the white cedar for ribs was really fun. My son and I would do all the ribs in a couple of hours. Soaking wood for long periods helps. Some people use fabric softner in the steamer water but I heard it may make the wood change color.

the best part of steam bending was putting shrimp or lobster in the steamer after the ribs were done! Nice cedar flavored shrimp or lobster are a great finish!

Denise, Bristol PA, Oday 30. On Tidal Delaware River, Anchor Yacht Club.
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post #8 of 19 Old 01-23-2011
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Oh yes, woodworking, done a little bit of that over the
last 65 years. Helped my dad build 2 houses, 2 boats and
a whole bunch of cabinet work. My wife and I have this hobby:

Paul and Nancy's Creations Home

Just about pays for itself. Cracks happen. Some of us see them
as a natural happening. Others may see them as something less
than perfect. I have read about all kinds of ways to dry wet wood.
Wrapping in newspaper for 2 to 3 months works pretty well. I am
trying putting them in the freezer. So far it seems quicker. Some put
smaller pieces in the microwave, or bury them in sawdust. Painting
the end grain may take a long time to dry?

Dabnis
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post #9 of 19 Old 01-23-2011
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Keep the tips coming! This is cool! Most of the time I have to learn the hard way and that is not always fun. The glue on the end and microwave steaming ideas both would (wood?) have saved me grief on past projects. Thanks!
DD

Doug
Jboat J/37c (new to me Jan 2011); J/22 #1003


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post #10 of 19 Old 01-23-2011
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I did the tablesaw pre-resawing "trick" once. I wanted to resaw some cedar to line a chest. You want to be really careful doing this, if you do it at all. My cedar had some tension in it and what happened was "spectacular". The wood pinched the blade and caused so much heat the blade started to warp. A warped blade caused more friction and more heat and more warping. By the time I reached the off switch smoke was being produced. Removing the wood revealed my Forrest blade imitating a Lays potato chip. What is truly remarkable is once the blade cooled off, it was as flat as it was before this happened. Now I only resaw on my bandsaw using a wide resaw blade.
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