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  #1  
Old 01-27-2011
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Nylon Jacklines with Dyneema Core - What Knot?

I read a post by Sailingdog where he mentioned a Jackline setup using tubular webbing with a 12-strand/dyneema core.

I like the Idea because no matter how hard I try to be, I just don't feel comfortable with my tubular nylon webbing Jacklines.

But, what knot could I use to secure the lines?

Thanks

Edit:

I was a bit off...

Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
The best jacklines I've seen are the ones made up of 1/4" spectra cord with a dacron webbing chafe protector over them. They're a bit more expensive than regular webbing, but IMHO worth it.

Last edited by serenespeed; 01-27-2011 at 03:12 PM.
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Nylon or dacron webbing will work.

I've seen them fastened a couple different ways.

One end is usually an eyesplice and either fastened through a padeye or over a cleat luggage tag style, where the eye splice passes through the hole in the padeye or base of the cleat and then the rest of the line is passed through the eyesplice and then the eyesplice is snugged up around the padeye or cleat.

The other end can be an eyesplice that is brought through a cleat and then passed over the top of the cleat or it can be a plain end that is put around a cleat and cleat hitched and then has the bitter end seized to the standing part and the webbing brought up over the whole thing and sewn in place.

Another option is to attach the line using a privileged cowhitch and then lockstitch/seize the bitter end to the standing part of the line. This would work on either a cleat or padeye.

Privileged Cow Hitch:



For additional security, instead of just seizing and lock stitching the bitter end, you could pass it through the standing part ala a brummel splice and then seize/lock stitch it.

Start of brummel splice in 12 strand line:


Then snug the webbing up around the line as tightly as possible.

I hope this helps.
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Old 01-27-2011
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Exclamation

Am planning to replace my existing wire jacklines with webing but I am surprised to see round section webbing in the photo. Surly flat section would avoid the possibility of the jack stay rolling underfoot and fliping me overboard.
Safe sailing.
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You might want to read my original post on jacklines, tethers and harnesses. That isn't round webbing, it is a dyneema or spectra 12-strand single braid that is used as the core of your jacklines and has a piece of webbing run over it to give it chafe and uv protection. The webbing makes the jackline very unlikely to roll under foot and makes the jackline clearly and easily identifiable by sight or touch.

Quote:
Originally Posted by centaursailor View Post
Am planning to replace my existing wire jacklines with webing but I am surprised to see round section webbing in the photo. Surly flat section would avoid the possibility of the jack stay rolling underfoot and fliping me overboard.
Safe sailing.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
You might want to read my original post on jacklines, tethers and harnesses. That isn't round webbing, it is a dyneema or spectra 12-strand single braid that is used as the core of your jacklines and has a piece of webbing run over it to give it chafe and uv protection. The webbing makes the jackline very unlikely to roll under foot and makes the jackline clearly and easily identifiable by sight or touch.
Very informative, tho I was thinking of the flat webbing sold over here and rated as suitable for jackstays. My wire ones have to go anyway.

Happy sailing
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One word of warning, if you use the flat webbing, put a few twists in it before tying it off. If you have the webbing flat and taut and the wind blows across it, you're gonna regret having them. They will start to flap and moan... and that will drive you crazy—so put some twists in the webbing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by centaursailor View Post
Very informative, tho I was thinking of the flat webbing sold over here and rated as suitable for jackstays. My wire ones have to go anyway.

Happy sailing
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
One word of warning, if you use the flat webbing, put a few twists in it before tying it off. If you have the webbing flat and taut and the wind blows across it, you're gonna regret having them. They will start to flap and moan... and that will drive you crazy—so put some twists in the webbing.

SD beat me to it! Yep, twist the jackLINE for all the previous mentioned reasons as well as it makes it easier to clip on. You can just open the clip and slide it onto the line.
AFA tying off, fasten the eye end to the fwd deck cleat, run it aft and tie it off w/ a cleat hitch and weave the excess around the horns and w/ more figure 8's and fiinish by tucking the end of the webbing under the last layer.
Oh, and re-tie and snug up after it gets wet as it will stretch.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailordave View Post
AFA tying off, fasten the eye end to the fwd deck cleat, run it aft and tie it off w/ a cleat hitch and weave the excess around the horns and w/ more figure 8's and fiinish by tucking the end of the webbing under the last layer.
Oh, and re-tie and snug up after it gets wet as it will stretch.
Alternately wet it stretch it and tie it off. I put the jackline around the cleat and then to a winch to tighten it. Or I will tie a piece of line to the jackline with a rolling hitch harden it and cleat off the jackline.
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Yes, you would have to do this with a webbing only jackline, but when installing a spectra-cored one, you would not have to do this. Spectra or dyneema lines do not stretch noticeably.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sailordave View Post
SD beat me to it! Yep, twist the jackLINE for all the previous mentioned reasons as well as it makes it easier to clip on. You can just open the clip and slide it onto the line.
AFA tying off, fasten the eye end to the fwd deck cleat, run it aft and tie it off w/ a cleat hitch and weave the excess around the horns and w/ more figure 8's and fiinish by tucking the end of the webbing under the last layer.
Oh, and re-tie and snug up after it gets wet as it will stretch.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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Old 01-28-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
One word of warning, if you use the flat webbing, put a few twists in it before tying it off. If you have the webbing flat and taut and the wind blows across it, you're gonna regret having them. They will start to flap and moan... and that will drive you crazy—so put some twists in the webbing.
Sounds good to me, am thinking of a centerline setup on my 26`er. Maybe a continious loop from both sides of the hatch round the mast and fwd hatch. Pass it thro a fixing near the bow cleat.
Safer sailing
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