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-   -   Help choosing my barrier coat system: Interprotect vs. West System vs. Other? (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/gear-maintenance/71887-help-choosing-my-barrier-coat-system-interprotect-vs-west-system-vs-other.html)

Beersmith 02-07-2011 10:20 AM

Help choosing my barrier coat system: Interprotect vs. West System vs. Other?
 
After stripping off all of the gelcoat below the waterline, grinding out blisters, and drying the hull for about 8 months; I am nearing the time where I will begin to repair, fair, barrier coat and paint.

I am trying to figure out which products I will be using so I can cost out the whole thing and get organized. I have some questions regarding which brands/systems I should go with at each stage. I am trying to pick the best product for each stage of the bottom job, but I keep reading that I should stick with one system (such as Interlux from fairing all the way to paint). But I also see products like West System or System Three that would require me to use another brand for paint...so a full bottom job with one brand might not be necessary.

For filling, fairing and repairing I had intended on using West System or US Composites epoxy with the necessary fillers for the job. (edit: and I just now discovered Interlux Epiglass to add to the confusion) I will need to do a lot of fairing on the bottom, so would West System be a good choice or should I consider a product like System Three Quickfair, or Interlux Interprotect Watertite Epoxy Filler?

I then intend to add a barrier coat using either West System epoxy + barrier coat filler; or the Interlux Interprotect system. What are the advantages/disadvantages of each barrier coat system? I see many people using Interprotect around the boat yard, but since I will be buying a ton of epoxy for the fairing job and for other uses around the boat I don't see why I shouldn't just use West System barrier coat filler for the job. Is it an inferior product for protecting against water intrusion? I am a little skeptical due to the overwhelming use of Interprotect.

As for bottom paint...I'll come to that at another time and will probably ask around the local area for what works best. I am more concerned about the fairing and barrier coat right now. I just don't want to do a bad job because it cost less (hypothetically) to use System Three fairing, West System barrier coat, then Interlux bottom paint; only to find that the three don't work well together.

T37Chef 02-07-2011 10:22 AM

I used the Petitt product, see more here: http://www.sailnet.com/forums/322678-post.html

harbin2 02-08-2011 12:03 PM

I don't have the experience of many others here but I did what you are doing two years ago and I'll give you my comments. The boat had a West barrier coat from about 8 years ago (by a PO). I removed some of it and applied 2 coats of Interprotect. I liked the way it mixed and went on. I also liked the color (I used white). I was able to get it discounted. I did little fairing but what I did, I used MAS. I like West products but the MAS is easier to mix in small quantities since it is a 2 to 1 ratio (no pumps, etc.). I did use an Interlux paint but I find it hard to believe the brand of epoxy, barrier coat, and paint makes much of a difference. I feel for the work you have done - especially if you did it yourself - like I did. I have been happy with the results.
harbin2
Islander 30

sailingfool 02-08-2011 03:21 PM

I would not worry about different products working together as long as you read and follow their prep rules.

You should use the right product for each job.

Use the Interlux Watertite for divot filling, two layers, the first a rough fill, the second a careful level fill, as it is a bear to sand.

Use West epoxy with microballoons for fairing as it's very easy to spread and sand.

Interprotect 2000 is specialized for barrier coating, it set ups slowly and is easy to roll. West does not make a barrier coating product, although their epoxy doubtlessly makes an excellent barrier coat - if you can get it not to cook up fast, and develop a good roller routine. I have to admit, I never tried to overcome these challenges, the Interprotect to too good at it what it does to struggle with regular epoxy.

sailingdog 02-08-2011 03:38 PM

If you use West Systems epoxy and microballoons for the filler, don't forget to coat it with a layer of unthickened epoxy or the microballoons can absorb water. As for the barrier coat, I'd recommend going with Interprotect 2000E.

From a post I wrote previously on applying Interprotect...

Quote:

Originally Posted by sailingdog (Post 211860)
Alternating the colors helps a lot with determining where you've painted, but it is also very useful for helping you coat the areas around the boat stands. For instance:

The first layer is gray, since the gelcoat is white, and you can paint right up to the boat stand pads. Then you paint a layer of white, and leave about a two-inch margin of gray paint around the pads... then paint a layer a gray and leave a four-inch margin around the pads or about two-inches of white and two inches of gray showing...and then finish with a layer of white—with a six-inch margin around the pads—with two inches of gray, two inches of white and two inches of gray.

Then when you move the boat stands, you can fill in the pads and layer the paint accordingly... adding gray to cover the white square left by the pad.. then white to cover the gray square, and so on.

Also, by alternating colors, you can see if someone has sanded through the barrier coat when you're prepping the boat for re-painting. If there's an area that is gray or grayish, they've sanded through at least the outermost layer of barrier coat. If you had all white, you wouldn't be able to tell if they had sanded down through the barrier coat as easily—if you had all gray, you could tell they sanded through the barrier coat...but not if they've sanded into it...

I hope this helps clear things up a bit.


zz4gta 02-08-2011 04:35 PM

If you are fairing the bottom of your boat, get templates for the keel and rudder as well. This little extra step can add a tremendous amount of performace to your boat. Spend 80-90% of your effort on the foils, the other 10-20% on the rest of your bottom. Do it once, and it'll pay you back year after year. I used west systems epoxy, a little more expensive (buy the pumps if you go this route) but its simple enough to work with. I used silica for filler below the waterline. I had to build up a section of the keel and rudder, then shave 3/16" off the side of the keel. The silica as a filler is very hard to sand, use it sparingly.

I used petite products. You need a mixing attachment on a drill to mix the barrier coat but that's not uncommon. I only wish I had sanded the last coat a bit smoother as this would've allowed the bottom paint to go on smoother. Allow proper drying time. All I did was wipe down the gelcoat with acetone, and roll on the barrier coat.

I'm using white Vivid paint and just thinned it the max allowed and rolled it w/ 1/8" foam rollers. This year I plan to thin and roll and tip for a better/smoother finish. Spraying would be the best, but hell, you're going to re-coat next year anyway.

Maintenance is diving on the boat with a sponge once a month until it gets warm. Then its once a week. When it starts to get chilly, I go back to twice a month, then once a month, then I say screw it when the water hits 50*.

tommays 02-08-2011 05:38 PM

Everybody wants about a 20-mil thickness :)

West likes there 422 barrier coat Additive and there techs that answer question on there Sailing Anchary WEST sponsored Fix It Anarchy section make a compelling argument for its use

Beersmith 02-08-2011 09:01 PM

Thanks a bunch for the information everyone

Beersmith 02-08-2011 09:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tommays (Post 695851)
Everybody wants about a 20-mil thickness :)

West likes there 422 barrier coat Additive and there techs that answer question on there Sailing Anchary WEST sponsored Fix It Anarchy section make a compelling argument for its use

well after reading this I'm still torn between West System (using 422 Barrier coat additive) or Interprotect 2000E.

Any other arguments for one or the other?

sailingdog 02-08-2011 09:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Beersmith (Post 695938)
well after reading this I'm still torn between West System (using 422 Barrier coat additive) or Interprotect 2000E.

Any other arguments for one or the other?

If you use Interprotect 2000E, you can alternate the colors to make sure you get the proper coverage levels, which is more difficult to do with West system. Also, West System epoxy has amine blush issues.


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