Long Time, No Bottom Job - SailNet Community
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post #1 of 20 Old 02-25-2011 Thread Starter
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Long Time, No Bottom Job

I have looked at many boats that have been sitting in their slips for years without moving. Some have been sitting there used only by the owner's to spend the night it still tied to the dock and haven't even been underway in a decade or more. Besides the negatives of the motor not being run, what happens to a fiberglass boat that sits unused in a slip for year after year without having a bottom job done? Does it matter if it has been sitting in saltwater, freshwater, or brackish water for this past decade as to what the extent of possible problems will be once it is pulled out of the water?
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post #2 of 20 Old 02-25-2011
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probablely not as bad as one would think,ofcoarse fresh water is much kinder than salt water but even so the scum that builds up over time actually acts as a protectant and unless the hull is prone to blistering pressure washing and lots of oyster/barnacle scraping and the results are amazing,as for the engine[diesel]if its not seized its probablely ok,the prop shaft might be gaulded/pitted at the cutless bearing or stuffing box but even so unless it was dirt cheap i would have it hauled before buying
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post #3 of 20 Old 02-25-2011
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I know one boat in our marina that is probably connected to the bottom with an ancient column of barnacles...

It's a non moving l/a 27' Cherubini Hunter... a cool but scary madman lives aboard that boat.
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post #4 of 20 Old 02-25-2011
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Well, in many cases, the underwater hardware will be toast, since the boat owners that neglect their bottom paint probably don't replace their zincs either.

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post #5 of 20 Old 02-25-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sawingknots View Post
,of course fresh water is much kinder than salt water
Actually I believe that to not be exactly correct.

My understanding is that salt water is more of a mission for boat owners because of the hobbly gobblies that live in it and attach to a boat but the density of salt water makes it less likely to penetrate gelcoat and create osmosis in the hull than fresh water.

So if the hull is of dubious quality, fresh water is potentially more damaging than salt water.

Maybe the bottom specialists will pitch in and correct me. Fastbottoms?


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post #6 of 20 Old 02-25-2011
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Omatako
That is what I have heard as well.

When a boat has been afloat for years and neglected, when hauling pressure wash and clean the science project off immediately. Once it dries the labor quadruples or worse.

Brian
Living aboard in Victoria Harbour

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post #7 of 20 Old 02-25-2011
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AFAIK, for osmosis problems, fresh water is worse, since it has a higher osmotic pressure than salt water—since it is purer than salt water. However, salt water is worse for the underwater hardware, since salt water is far more reactive galvanically speaking.

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Actually I believe that to not be exactly correct.

My understanding is that salt water is more of a mission for boat owners because of the hobbly gobblies that live in it and attach to a boat but the density of salt water makes it less likely to penetrate gelcoat and create osmosis in the hull than fresh water.

So if the hull is of dubious quality, fresh water is potentially more damaging than salt water.

Maybe the bottom specialists will pitch in and correct me. Fastbottoms?

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her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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post #9 of 20 Old 02-25-2011
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Every marina should have a sergeant at arms who is to shoot the owner on sight, if their keel looks like that.


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post #10 of 20 Old 02-25-2011
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looks like a character out of 'Pirates of the Carribean!!'

in fresh water the carp can help out some by sucking off the yuck.

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