Size & Type: Dock lines vs. Mooring lines - Page 2 - SailNet Community

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  #11  
Old 05-18-2011
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Three-strand nylon. Springs the length of the boat, bow and stern lines 2/3 length of the boat as a minimum.
1/2" is enough for your boat but 5/8" will give better 'hand'. I'd pick 1/2" because it takes less stowage space, important on a small boat.
Three-strand nylon has good abrasion resistance and tends not to snag. I wouldn't use braid for dock lines because it has limited stretch and is difficult to splice. Can't see the point in using expensive braid and then having to put snubbers in the line to create stretch.
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Old 05-18-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JordanH View Post
Since I'm replacing so much line at once, does it make sense to buy a bulk spool that can be used for mooring lines, docking lines and maybe get some mileage for extra anchor line?
Yep. I just bought two spools to replace all my lines and have some extra. I prefer three-stand for the extra stretch - a good think in dock lines. The splicing is so easy that you can sit in the club bar and splice. *grin*
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Old 05-18-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JordanH View Post
Thanks delite. uh... although rise & fall of the tide here in the Great Lakes is minimal. I appreciate the arrangement suggestions, but the question here is more about the type of line; Braid vs. 3-strand.
Jordan, I use 3-strand dock lines that I leave on the dock at my slip. I have double-braid that I leave on the boat. For double-braid, I would just keep an eye out for sales at WM or other suppliers. They often have pre-spiced dock lines on sale.

My thought is that, like you, I like handling double-braid more than 3-strand. The lines that I leave on the boat don't get much weather and comparatively little use. They simply need to be strong and easy to use.

The lines that get left on the dock take the weather year round and get the most abuse, hence are replaced more often. Three strand stretches, is less expensive to replace, and I can splice myself.

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Old 05-18-2011
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Jordan
I won't add anything to any of the info given above on sizing and lengths, all very right on the money. but as far a splicing goes it is VERY easy ot do in double braid go to the following web site and teach your self. I have done many splices this way and they work great. Once you do a couple they even look professional.
How to Eye Splice double braid rope

Have a great summer and fair winds
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Old 05-18-2011
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Ok, I have my answers. Now to go looking for good deals...

Peter, great! I like working with rope and will add braid splicing to my repertoire soon. I've bookmarked that link, it's a good one. Thanks!
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Old 05-19-2011
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Don't use that page as a splicing guide. That splice is completely wrong. The strength of an eye splice comes from the bury of the line inside itself. Not from poking the core though the core a bunch of times. All he did was make a huge stress riser where the diameter of the line suddenly shrunk were the splice ended, and sure enough that's where his splice broke.

It's like tying a dozen overhand knots instead of bowline. An overhand knot is weaker than a bowline. A dozen overhand knots doesn't get any stronger, but it does get stupider.

A proper double braid splice can be seen here: YouTube - ‪splicing double braid‬‏
Or in these instructions. http://www.samsonrope.com/site_files...Splice_Rev.pdf
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Old 05-19-2011
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I'm confused here. You're mooring against a dock?

Are you docking alongside a dock? Or moored to a ball? Or docking bow/stern in, med style?

I've never heard of thimbles being used or needed in a docking line, which is normally cleated off in the US. (I'm probably losing something in the translation, I'm not really fluent in Canadian. (G) )

The purpose of 3-strand docking lines is that they have some natural spring in them, as you pull tight they untwist a bit, acting as a torsion spring for their entire length. A braided line can't and won't do that, making it unsuitable for docking or mooring lines as it will chafe instead of stretching. Sure, they feel smoother and can be used--but they're the wrong line for the job. Wornout halyards, etc. are often the source of braided "docking" lines, just being used a bit longer before they get scrapped.
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Old 05-19-2011
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To clarify what I'm going on aboot, I use the terms in this way;
I use the term "docking lines" for lines that I use in the process of docking as well as while temporarily attaching myself to a dock. I mean, they are not permanently fixed to the dock.

I use the term "mooring lines" for lines that are permanently attached to where I moor. Although we often think of this as a mooring ball, it is not limited to such. No translation required, "mooring" has the same meaning in the simplified, American English version of the dictionary. (g). In my case, the mooring will be floating docks at the club

A typical practice, and often requirement, at yacht clubs is to permanently attach chain to the docks (or cleats) and then the lines are permanently attached to the chain via a thimble spliced into the mooring line. This provides a strong attachment point with good chafe protection... good for safety, good for club insurance. :-)

I boil it down to mooring lines stay on the dock, docking lines are kept aboard the boat.
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Old 05-19-2011
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So your lines don't chafe because they are chain. What keeps your boat from chafing because you're tied to a dock with chain?
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In most of the world, outside the US, tying up to a dock is considered mooring.
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