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-   -   Mastclimber Safety Line (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/gear-maintenance/74617-mastclimber-safety-line.html)

ccriders 05-20-2011 10:58 AM

Mastclimber Safety Line
 
The ATN Mastclimber is designed so that a solo sailor can ascend the mast. Everything you read strongly advises to always use a safety line when ascending the mast. Has anyone figured out an effective and efficient means of providing a self operated safety line with the mast climber?
John

Allanbc 05-20-2011 11:28 AM

prussic knot on a separate line or possibly the mast

ccriders 06-01-2011 10:16 AM

Well the morning winds finally dropped below 15kts and the chop in the marina subsided and I finally got to practice with my new ATN Mastclimber. Thanks for your suggestion on how to rig the safety line. I attached the jib halyard to a stancion base and winched it down as tight as I could get it and attached the ATN to it. Then I attached the main halyard to a padeye on the mast and cleated it off as tightly as possible and put a safety strap using double fisherman knots to make a loop and a prussic knot to attach to the main halyard. Thanks for your suggestion, worked like a charm.
Denise expressed having some difficulty in using the ATN in another thread and a couple of SNers recommended small steps. Good advice. Going slow with small steps and remembering the sequence: stand, raise chair, raise safety loop, sit, raise feet, stand....
This, however is not to say the whole operation is like eating cake! First of all that tiny skinny old halyard no longer looks so robust. I know it's 3/8 Stayset X and is only 3 yrs old, but....
Everything feels spungy, like you are on a trampoline or bungy jumping, but when you look closely you are just swinging back and forth, not up and down.
Turns out the hardest part is the toll it takes on your arm muscles. I don't normally use my arms like that so I fatigued rather easily. But, slow small steps with rest stops helps.
So I got the shroud down, will fabricate the replacements today and install them tomorrow.
Thanks to SailNet Community for good advice and information.
John

pdqaltair 06-01-2011 11:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ccriders (Post 736229)
Well the morning winds finally dropped below 15kts and the chop in the marina subsided and I finally got to practice with my new ATN Mastclimber. Thanks for your suggestion on how to rig the safety line. I attached the jib halyard to a stancion base and winched it down as tight as I could get it and attached the ATN to it. Then I attached the main halyard to a padeye on the mast and cleated it off as tightly as possible and put a safety strap using double fisherman knots to make a loop and a prussic knot to attach to the main halyard. Thanks for your suggestion, worked like a charm.
Denise expressed having some difficulty in using the ATN in another thread and a couple of SNers recommended small steps. Good advice. Going slow with small steps and remembering the sequence: stand, raise chair, raise safety loop, sit, raise feet, stand....
This, however is not to say the whole operation is like eating cake! First of all that tiny skinny old halyard no longer looks so robust. I know it's 3/8 Stayset X and is only 3 yrs old, but....
Everything feels spungy, like you are on a trampoline or bungy jumping, but when you look closely you are just swinging back and forth, not up and down.
Turns out the hardest part is the toll it takes on your arm muscles. I don't normally use my arms like that so I fatigued rather easily. But, slow small steps with rest stops helps.
So I got the shroud down, will fabricate the replacements today and install them tomorrow.
Thanks to SailNet Community for good advice and information.
John

Now, just imagine learning to do that about 500 feet off the ground in Yosemite, with the top end of the line attached to an expantion bolt and no safety line. Needless to say, smart climbers inspect their ropes and double check knots.

ccriders 06-01-2011 12:11 PM

PDQ
NO thanks. 48 feet is enough. But I am thankful that you guys learned how to do it and shared your knowledge.
John

pdqaltair 06-01-2011 06:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ccriders (Post 736267)
PDQ
NO thanks. 48 feet is enough. But I am thankful that you guys learned how to do it and shared your knowledge.
John

Yeah, it's bloody hard work; I use a MAST MATE ladder on the boat, though I have the other gear; it's easier and faster.

deniseO30 06-01-2011 11:39 PM

Talking with a client that also happens to be a sailor. was telling him about my halarious attempt to use the ATN. prussic knot was his suggestion.. What if you have to go up and there are NO halyards? prussic knot He showed me how it's done with nylon webbing.. interesting... Prusik Knot | How to tie the Prusik Knot | Climbing Knots

http://www.animatedknots.com/photos/prusik/prusikR6.jpg

Allanbc 06-02-2011 08:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by deniseO30 (Post 736478)
Talking with a client that also happens to be a sailor. was telling him about my halarious attempt to use the ATN. prussic knot was his suggestion.. What if you have to go up and there are NO halyards? prussic knot He showed me how it's done with nylon webbing.. interesting... Prusik Knot | How to tie the Prusik Knot | Climbing Knots

http://www.animatedknots.com/photos/prusik/prusikR6.jpg

You can climb a mast with just prusik knots. If you do that, I recommend carrying extra slings to tie more knots when you cross the spreaders. Doing that means that you do not have to untie and retie your knots while hanging onto the mast.

I'm a caver so I just use the system that I use for climbing out of pits. It is much more efficient that the ATN. I also haul a piece of static caving rope up the halyard to make climbing easier. When I am done, I switch over and rappel down. To me this is much easier and safer, especially since I have the gear and have been doing vertical caves for over 30 years.


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