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post #11 of 34 Old 07-10-2011
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Always, always let the motor run the carb dry at the end of every day. Do this religiously to avoid varnishing in the carb. 75% of my outboard repairs these days is cleaning carbs that were left with fuel in them. I do at least one a week during the summer season. Of course, you will want to squeeze the primer hose bulb to refill the carb before restarting.

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post #12 of 34 Old 07-10-2011
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Always, always let the motor run the carb dry at the end of every day. Do this religiously to avoid varnishing in the carb. 75% of my outboard repairs these days is cleaning carbs that were left with fuel in them. I do at least one a week during the summer season. Of course, you will want to squeeze the primer hose bulb to refill the carb before restarting.
Another step is to drain the carb if you are not going to use the motor for a couple of weeks or so. Running it "dry" can still leave a small amount of fuel in the bottom of the float bowl which can dry up and leave debris to later be sucked up, clogging jets.

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post #13 of 34 Old 07-11-2011
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I was taught to squeeze the bulb before every start. I will try to start the engine without next time.
Works like a charm! However, after reading the subseqent posts, I have to wonder if this is a good thing, since it seems to mean that there is still fuel in my carb leftover from the last time. I started disconnecting the fuel line and storing it out of the sun after every trip, so maybe I will now disconnect it immediately and let the carb run dry. This is of course, assuming I have the time to do so; sometimes the Admiral and/or our guests are less than accomodating and want to leave semi-immediately upon arrival at the dock.
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post #14 of 34 Old 07-11-2011
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... assuming I have the time to do so; sometimes the Admiral and/or our guests are less than accomodating and want to leave semi-immediately upon arrival at the dock.
Doesn't that wear thin....

I've learned that it helps to tell them about how long I am going to spend puting the boat away. Gradually they learn it is not a car. They don't know unless you explain.

I'm in the "don't drain" camp and have neither found varnish or drained a carb in 20 years. the difficulty is that the engine almost always starves and dies BEFORE the carb is MT, absolutely assuring that what remains behind will dry. I believe it is urban legend and I have noticed that not all manufacturers still advise this. You don't run your car dry, do you?

I have cleaned carbs about 6 of times. Each time the PO religiously ran them MT and disconented the lines. I replaced the worn-out couplers (from all that on-and-off silliness) and cleaned the carbs... and never fooled with them again.

The primer bulb thing seems rather fuel system specific. Some boats it helps, some it makes no difference. Obviously, running rich after pumping is a worn float valve.

(when asked how he reached the starting holds on a difficult rock climbing problem that clearly favored taller climbers - he was perhaps 5'5")

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post #15 of 34 Old 07-11-2011
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Doesn't that wear thin....

I've learned that it helps to tell them about how long I am going to spend puting the boat away. Gradually they learn it is not a car. They don't know unless you explain.

I'm in the "don't drain" camp and have neither found varnish or drained a carb in 20 years. the difficulty is that the engine almost always starves and dies BEFORE the carb is MT, absolutely assuring that what remains behind will dry. I believe it is urban legend and I have noticed that not all manufacturers still advise this. You don't run your car dry, do you?

I have cleaned carbs about 6 of times. Each time the PO religiously ran them MT and disconented the lines. I replaced the worn-out couplers (from all that on-and-off silliness) and cleaned the carbs... and never fooled with them again.

The primer bulb thing seems rather fuel system specific. Some boats it helps, some it makes no difference. Obviously, running rich after pumping is a worn float valve.
PD,

I can only speak from my own experience. I forgot to drain the carb after summer use. Next summer, no go, lots of grungy stuff in the float bowl. Cleaned it all out thoroughly and it ran fine. I suppose it is how long it sits there before it evaporates and leaves bad stuff behind. Not sure exactely how
long that is but draining is quick and easy. Taking it all apart after discovering it won't run is a pain. Even if run empty a small amount of fuel is left in the bowl which can evaporate and leave bad stuff behind to be sucked up later. Draining virtually gets it all out.

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post #16 of 34 Old 07-11-2011
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Doesn't that wear thin....

I've learned that it helps to tell them about how long I am going to spend puting the boat away. Gradually they learn it is not a car. They don't know unless you explain.

I'm in the "don't drain" camp and have neither found varnish or drained a carb in 20 years. the difficulty is that the engine almost always starves and dies BEFORE the carb is MT, absolutely assuring that what remains behind will dry. I believe it is urban legend and I have noticed that not all manufacturers still advise this. You don't run your car dry, do you?

I have cleaned carbs about 6 of times. Each time the PO religiously ran them MT and disconented the lines. I replaced the worn-out couplers (from all that on-and-off silliness) and cleaned the carbs... and never fooled with them again.

The primer bulb thing seems rather fuel system specific. Some boats it helps, some it makes no difference. Obviously, running rich after pumping is a worn float valve.

The Admiral only objects if I really start futzing around. If I say I need to scub the deck, she believes me (I almost never "need" to scrub the deck). Guests are usually willing to help, but if the no-see-ums are out (a regular occurance at dusk at my marina), then even I am usually happy to head for the hills and leave the polishing for another day.

I never drained the carb before, so maybe its not so important. However, I am a convert to removal and storage of the fuel line. I had so much trouble with my fuel line last year that I deceided to follow a more conservative approach and to disconnect and store the fuel line in the fuel locker after each trip. No problems since. Is it because or in spite of my storage routine? Don't know, and probably won't ever know.
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post #17 of 34 Old 07-11-2011
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PD,

I can only speak from my own experience. I forgot to drain the carb after summer use. Next summer, no go, lots of grungy stuff in the float bowl. Cleaned it all out thoroughly and it ran fine. I suppose it is how long it sits there before it evaporates and leaves bad stuff behind. Not sure exactely how
long that is but draining is quick and easy. Taking it all apart after discovering it won't run is a pain. Even if run empty a small amount of fuel is left in the bowl which can evaporate and leave bad stuff behind to be sucked up later. Draining virtually gets it all out.

Dabnis
... only the grungy stuff may well have (probably) came from the fuel tank. Separted water and corrosion products. Varnish would form from drying, crud is from up-stream. There is no evidense that waste came from dried fuel.

(when asked how he reached the starting holds on a difficult rock climbing problem that clearly favored taller climbers - he was perhaps 5'5")

"Well, I just climb up to them."

by Joe Brown, English rock climber




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post #18 of 34 Old 07-11-2011
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... only the grungy stuff may well have (probably) came from the fuel tank. Separted water and corrosion products. Varnish would form from drying, crud is from up-stream. There is no evidense that waste came from dried fuel.
This motor has an extremely fine mesh filter inside the fuel line not seen from the outside. It was completely clean when I took it all apart? The debris I found was fairly large, about pepper flake size, maybe dried varnish bits? It could not have passed through the filter. Good point though, I think I will do an experiment by putting some gas in a small covered container and let it evaporate slowly and see what happens? I know, too much time on my hands!!

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post #19 of 34 Old 07-11-2011
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This motor has an extremely fine mesh filter inside the fuel line not seen from the outside. It was completely clean when I took it all apart? The debris I found was fairly large, about pepper flake size, maybe dried varnish bits? It could not have passed through the filter. Good point though, I think I will do an experiment by putting some gas in a small covered container and let it evaporate slowly and see what happens? I know, too much time on my hands!!

Dabnis
Good experiment. Love it.

I'm betting, though, that it is both; water/ethanol entered the carb (through the filter), caused corrosion of the bowl, and that is part of the flakes. That is what I have seen. Aluminum corrosion products (aluminum hydroxide) can also make a gel, either white on it's own or black if there is some other junk mixed in. Dried gas won't make a gel by itself; it can make a thin layer of varnish.

(I'm a chemical engineer in the refining business)

(when asked how he reached the starting holds on a difficult rock climbing problem that clearly favored taller climbers - he was perhaps 5'5")

"Well, I just climb up to them."

by Joe Brown, English rock climber




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post #20 of 34 Old 07-11-2011
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Good experiment. Love it.

I'm betting, though, that it is both; water/ethanol entered the carb (through the filter), caused corrosion of the bowl, and that is part of the flakes. That is what I have seen. Aluminum corrosion products (aluminum hydroxide) can also make a gel, either white on it's own or black if there is some other junk mixed in. Dried gas won't make a gel by itself; it can make a thin layer of varnish.

(I'm a chemical engineer in the refining business)
PD, OK, I think what you are saying is that the debris may have accumulated in the bowl during normal use and not the evaporation process? If so, might not draining the bowl from time to time help to get rid of some or all of the debris?I will let you know how the evaporation expiriment comes out, may take a while. I have used Berryman's B-12 fuel additive for years which is supposed ti absorb moisture? I have never seen any water in the bottom of my various fuel tanks. I will try another expiriment, put some gas in a container, add some water, then add some B-12 and see if the water goes away?

Dabnis

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