What to do with bilge water? - Page 2 - SailNet Community
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #11 of 35 Old 07-12-2011
Senior Member
 
Captainmeme's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: East Tennessee
Posts: 998
Thanks: 7
Thanked 29 Times in 28 Posts
Rep Power: 7
 
Pump the water into jugs, carry the jugs home, dump the water into your toilet. Don't tell anyone and close the bathroom door.

"A man in Florida let his kids play with a bottle of mercury," We use to take mercury to school in bottles and play with it during recess. I'm still alive and have not grown an extra limb or eye in the 50 years since then. Common sense isn't common anymore.
Captainmeme is online now  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #12 of 35 Old 07-12-2011
Crotchety Old Member
 
tomperanteau's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: San Pedro Harbor, California
Posts: 901
Thanks: 2
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Rep Power: 7
 
Heaven forbid your bilge pump should come on.

Our marina is close to where the large ships come in. The oil tankers, car carriers and cargo ships all dock along where we sail out. Once a week or so we see diesel or something else spilled from one of them. We're probably talking many gallons, too. I don't think I've ever seen any of them fined.

Capt'n Tom Living Aboard 50/50

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

S/V Footprints

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Youtube

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


1976 41' Morgan Out Island Sloop. Refitting and redoing her interior for an extended voyage.
tomperanteau is online now  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #13 of 35 Old 07-12-2011
Senior Member
 
kd3pc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Callao, VA
Posts: 1,387
Thanks: 0
Thanked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Rep Power: 9
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomperanteau View Post
Once a week or so we see diesel or something else spilled from one of them. We're probably talking many gallons, too. I don't think I've ever seen any of them fined.
Of course not, that would make to much sense...kind of like banning that awful copper from "recreational boats, under 65'".....while a week later we find hospitals are going to use copper sheeting to "kill germs, eliminate MRSA" and other things...

Bad or not bad? Matters not to the powers that be....and the enforcers. They are busy siting people on the lakes for not having their un-used sinks plugged...you no, NO discharges
kd3pc is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #14 of 35 Old 07-12-2011
Learning the HARD way...
 
eherlihy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Boston / Ft Myers Area
Posts: 4,023
Thanks: 158
Thanked 105 Times in 102 Posts
Rep Power: 9
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by knothead View Post
I would use some oil diapers to absorb the oil then dispose of the remaining water overboard or by pouring it out on some asphalt.
which got me thinking... What do you suppose Asphalt is?

According to wikipedia;
Quote:
Asphalt /ˈæsfɔːlt/ is a sticky, black and highly viscous liquid or semi-solid that is present in most crude petroleums and in some natural deposits... One writer states that although a "considerable amount of work has been done on the composition of asphalt, it is exceedingly difficult to separate individual hydrocarbon in pure form",[2] and "it is almost impossible to separate and identify all the different molecules of asphalt, because the number of molecules with different chemical structure is extremely large".[3]
In American English, asphalt (or asphalt cement) is the carefully refined residue from the distillation process of selected crude oils...
reading on...
Quote:
Asphalt is typically stored and transported at temperatures around 150 degrees Celsius (300 °F). Sometimes diesel oil or kerosene are mixed in before shipping to retain liquidity; upon delivery, these lighter materials are separated out of the mixture. This mixture is often called bitumen feedstock, or BFS. Some dump trucks route the hot engine exhaust through pipes in the dump body to keep the material warm. The backs of tippers carrying asphalt, as well as some handling equipment, are also commonly sprayed with a releasing agent before filling to aid release. Diesel oil is sometimes used as a release agent, although it can mix with and thereby reduce the quality of the asphalt.
.
Now who is going to clean up THAT mess?


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

USCG Licensed OUPV Captain, ASA 101/103/104/105/106/118 Certified Instructor - Also certified in Recreational Marine Electrical Systems
eherlihy is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #15 of 35 Old 07-12-2011
1968 Pearson Wanderer 30
 
ilikerust's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Richmond, VA
Posts: 212
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 6
 
I can state with absolute certainty that large commercial vessels DO, in fact, get fined and sometimes even criminally investigated by the USCG for not properly managing their oily bilge water. It's simply a matter of getting caught. USCG takes it very seriously. The fact that you sometimes see big boats going by and leaving a rainbow in their wake doesn't mean they wouldn't get fined if the CG knew about it anymore than the cops don't care about the guy that passes you on the interstate every day on the way to work doing 89 miles per hour. Sooner or later, he'll get caught and get a ticket.

The simple answer as to why you can't just pump your oily bilge water out is that it's a violation of federal law. And EPA is proposing more regulations to make it even more complicated - specific bilge water management requirements for small pleasure craft.

I also can state with absolute certainty that owners of personal small pleasure vessels also can and will be fined for sheens on the water that are traced back to their boats. USCG or state officials will either respond to a complaint or report, or will trace a sheen that they come upon themselves. If they find it coming from your boat, you get your ticket punched. Just ask my father about it...

- Bill T.
- Richmond, VA

"Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn't do, than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover."
- Mark Twain
ilikerust is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #16 of 35 Old 07-12-2011
Courtney the Dancer
 
jrd22's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: San Juan Islands., WA, USA
Posts: 3,885
Thanks: 4
Thanked 22 Times in 21 Posts
Rep Power: 15
 
I'm with Knotty about this. If you use oil absorbent pads to soak up ALL the oil on the bilge water, what is left is going to be just water. If you take that water and pour it thru a clean oil absorbent pad what goes thru will be just water. The last time I checked with the reality police it was OK to dump WATER, on the ground. I'm sure if you called the local TV station and informed them of what you were doing some government agency would find something they could fine you for, so don't call them. Oh, and those "Waste Oil" tanks at marinas are just for WASTE OIL. No oily bilge water, no antifreeze, nothing but OIL. If you dump bilge water in the tank or anything except oil, the marina will have to pay hazardous waste disposal fees to get rid of it instead of the oil recycler taking it away for free. If this happens too often, guess what happens, the waste oil tank disappears and then people dispose of waste oil the old fashioned way, they dump it where they don't think anyone will see them (usually a storm drain that goes directly to a water way).

John
SV Laurie Anne

1988 Brewer 40 Pilothouse

jrd22 is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #17 of 35 Old 07-12-2011
Junior Member
 
aeventyr60's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Andaman Sea
Posts: 2,414
Thanks: 25
Thanked 66 Times in 63 Posts
Rep Power: 5
 
My old marina had a waste oil dump tank, bilge water and all kinds of gook was put into this tank. Maybe your marina or boatyard has one as well?
aeventyr60 is online now  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #18 of 35 Old 07-13-2011
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Long Island
Posts: 2,136
Thanks: 4
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
 
Here's another lawful possibility: My town will accept reasonable amounts of contaminants from residents for free. When I broke up an old boat I drained the fuel into cans and brought it to the dump, where they have a facility to recycle or properly dispose of gasoline, diesel, paint, antifreeze, etc. Look up your municipal website.
WanderingStar is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #19 of 35 Old 07-13-2011
Remember you're a womble
 
PaulinVictoria's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Sidney, BC
Posts: 2,114
Thanks: 10
Thanked 54 Times in 52 Posts
Rep Power: 6
 
I stick mine in a bucket and dump it over the side. One big advantage of having nothing oily in the boat

Orange Crush
1974 C&C27 MkII

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
PaulinVictoria is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #20 of 35 Old 07-13-2011
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 3,157
Thanks: 13
Thanked 15 Times in 14 Posts
Rep Power: 6
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Captainmeme View Post
Pump the water into jugs, carry the jugs home, dump the water into your toilet. Don't tell anyone and close the bathroom door.
I hope that was a tongue in cheek comment. Any other kind is highly irresponsible.

Many complain about "the garbage people through out" that they see in their travels, and then we get this advice?

Please tell me you were not serious.
cupper3 is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.


User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Bilge water - what's too much Tanley General Discussion (sailing related) 9 06-02-2010 11:36 PM
Water in the bilge inthesprings General Discussion (sailing related) 25 09-24-2009 02:44 PM
Bilge water BayDancer Catalina 1 07-08-2006 10:31 AM
Where does bilge water come from? chris1514 Gear & Maintenance 8 07-27-2003 07:51 AM
Water in the Bilge Dan Dickison Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 03-12-2001 07:00 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome