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  #1  
Old 07-18-2011
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Advice: Replacing Stuffing Box Hose

I need tips, pointers, what not to do, on pulling out the prop shaft to replace the stuffing box hose.
Thank you, Tom
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Old 07-19-2011
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Use "packing box" or "shaft log" hose, not exhaust hose.

Buck Algonquin Packing Box Hose
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Old 07-19-2011
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Haul the Boat

Just in case nobody thinks of it: boat out of the water for this step, eh?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Piratesoul View Post
I need tips, pointers, what not to do, on pulling out the prop shaft to replace the stuffing box hose.
Thank you, Tom
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Old 07-19-2011
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It's not rocket surgery. But it's a lot easier to do with the engine out of the boat. That way, you can just remove the prop and zinc and pull the shaft inside the boat. This is how I just did mine (engine going back in this Friday, hopefully).

Otherwise, you have to pull the shaft out the back end of the boat, and in order to do that, you have to pull the coupling off the shaft. That typically is pretty hard to do, given that it's an interference/press fit. And it's typically rusty. I removed my whole prop shaft with coupler intact and brought it home to my workshop. It was quite the struggle getting that coupler off - there's no way I would have been able to do it inside the boat, behind the engine.

But if you do manage to get your coupler off, you just pull the shaft out the back of the boat. Then it's just a matter of a few hose clamps and a new hose from Buck Algonquin.
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Old 07-19-2011
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funny i didn't have trouble getting coupler off shaft. it's not a press fit it's a snug slide on fit. release from engine. heat coupler with propane torch after you take out set bolts/screws and have released it from tranny out put coupler. you will need longer bolts. put a nut smaller than coupler hole between tranny shaft and prop shaft with longer bolts in place, then start tightening bolts equally after all is in place then put heat to shaft coupler and continue to tighten. you may have to smack coupler on shaft with a ball peen a couple of times once you get tension on bolts. if you can't get it to move at this point heat again the use P.B. blaster on coupler and shaft let sit over night then get back at it. it will start moving. mine was on for 27 yrs before i bought boat. it took about 4 tries before it started moving. had to use heat till last 1 1/2 inch then it it just started moving freely. don't forget that as coupler moves you will need longer spacers as you go. and don't over heat shaft can cause dmg to stuffing box. if coupler won't budge get a sawsall with metal blade and cut coupler on length. till almost thru, then take a cold chisel and drive in cut to expand coupler. then get new coupler at marine machine shop same as old.

Last edited by mike dryver; 07-19-2011 at 09:30 PM.
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Old 07-20-2011
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Dealing with the engine coupling flange was one task I wasn't particularly interested in facing, so I let the yard do it. Luckily, we have a good yard that does good work, completes it in a timely manner and doesn't try to take you to the cleaners.

Doesn't Maine Sail's site have a thing on dealing with the stuffing box coupling hose and engine coupling flange?

/me looks...

Close: PSS Shaft Seal Installation

Good luck.

Jim

Last edited by SEMIJim; 07-20-2011 at 07:30 AM.
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Old 07-20-2011
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I call BS on this....

Quote:
Luckily, we have a good yard that does good work, completes it in a timely manner and doesn't try to take you to the cleaners.
A yard like this doesn't exist! ; )

Back the OP question. If you end up pulling the shaft, you might as well replace the cutlass bearing too. Also, with the shaft pulled, if you have desired to replace the stuffing box with a dripless version, this would would be a good time to do it.

DrB
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Old 07-20-2011
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Thanks for the replies. How much time do you think is involved in this process? I have a guy that will do it for $60/h, I am not sure if I should tackle this myself. The guy's a pro and hopefully could do it on haulout day so I avoid a yard fee. If I try to do it myself.......who the hell knows?
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Old 07-20-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Piratesoul View Post
Thanks for the replies. How much time do you think is involved in this process? I have a guy that will do it for $60/h, I am not sure if I should tackle this myself. The guy's a pro and hopefully could do it on haulout day so I avoid a yard fee. If I try to do it myself.......who the hell knows?
There is no way to know "how long" as every job is different.


Some tips:

1- NEVER, EVER, EVER use, or let anyone use, a slide hammer to pull a shaft out of a coupling unless you want to buy a new gear box in short order. It will very, very likely brinell the bearings which creates a flat spot in the bearing or race..

2- Try and AVOID using the gear box flange to "press off" the old coupling if it is any older than a few months. These output flanges need to be aligned to .003" and you can bend one or break one quite easily trying to press a rusted coupling off.

3- Often times the flange needs to be cut off the shaft. I once cut one off and dropped it at a local machinist to see "what it took" to actually press it off. An five ton press was required to get it out. Some of them literally weld themselves to the shaft and no amount of PB Balster or heat seems to help. That one had two or three weeks of PB Blaster...

If you make a cut with an angle grinder just over the keyed slot in the coupling you won't harm the shaft. HOWEVER, you will have ferrous dust all over the interior of your engine compartment & boat that will turn to rust spots the minute humidity hits it. Not a good option...

4- In relation to #3 it is often far less costly and cleaner to cut the bronze or stainless shaft, no ferrous dust, and replace the coupling and shaft when you do this job.

5- I have seen many instances when someone wanted to try and save a penny and once the shaft was out and the gear box destroyed the shaft was so worn at the cutlass interface that it needed replacement anyway. So now they needed a new gear box, shaft and coupling....

6- DO NOT get any PB Blaster or any real penetrating oil on the gear box output seal or you'll likely be in for a re-build! Penetrating oils can soften and eat gear box output seals..

7- Straight couplings should be an interference fit or light press fit. Once you remove one that has any amount of rust this fit is usually destroyed. It is almost always best to replace the coupling any time you remove one. Having dealt with lots of shaft replacements I have seen perhaps less than 3-4% of the couplings that were actually re-usable.

8- Always have a new coupling fitted & faced to the shaft. This ensures that the coupling "fits" onto the shaft with the correct interference fit and that the face of it rotates perfectly with the shaft.

9- When re-installing consider a "split coupling" as opposed to a straight. Buck Algonquin makes these.

10- Use AWAB ot T-Band hose clamps on your new stuffing box hose and only use hose made specifically for stuffing boxes. Buck Algonquin also makes this hose.

11- Replace the cutlass bearing when you have the shaft out as this saves a ton of time and money..
Piratesoul and imsaint007 like this.
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