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-   -   running rigging replacement cost for a 30ft (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/gear-maintenance/76487-running-rigging-replacement-cost-30ft.html)

zibadun 07-18-2011 10:42 PM

running rigging replacement cost for a 30ft
 
I had an idea to hire out running rigging replacement on a 30ft sloop, with nothing fancy, just a double braid polyester. The estimate turned out to be 1700-2000+. So I told the rigger to replace just the main halyard for now (and I will do the rest by myself). He wants close to $500 for the halyard. This seems like at least 4x or 5x the cost of materials. Does this seem reasonable or am being taken for a ride?

davidpm 07-18-2011 10:58 PM

Don't know about the price but you may want to consider sta-set-x for the halyard as it is only a few penny's more than stay-set (double braid) but with less stretch.

Also I would want to know if the shivs need replacing as that would up the cost.
So if your mast is what less than 40' and you have the halyard run back to the cockpit you have maybe 90' of line probably 5/16" or 3/8" at about a $1.00 a foot retail and possibly a new shackle and about two hours maybe three at $100 an hour it looks like 3 to 4 hundred might be closer unless you are not telling us something.

Like the boat is on a mooring a mile out in the harbor and the line parted and the mast needs to be climbed.

zibadun 07-19-2011 12:22 AM

not hiding anything :). The old halyard is in place and the boat is at the dock, not far from the rigger guy, who is no doubt very experienced.

If you are saying that replacing a main halyard, without going aloft, requires three hours of highly skilled $100/hr labor and $200 worth of materials then I'm fine with it. I'm going to it in any case because I've bothered the person enough to feel obligated to order at least some service.

CalebD 07-19-2011 12:24 AM

Here is a tip: do it yourself. It is actually pretty easy to do.
Halyards are pretty easy to replace by stitching the new line onto an end of the old line and pulling it through. David is right that if your sheaves at the top of the mast are messed up this can be much more difficult to do.
Most of the lines on your boat are easy to replace but the line may cost a significant amount of money. I'd guess that you could replace ALL your running rigging on a Tartan 30 for under $500 in materials.
I'd consider getting this sewing tool to attach the 2 lines together: BAINBRIDGE INTL Needle at West Marine
be smart about burning the ends of each line you cut.

zibadun 07-19-2011 12:35 AM

Hey Caleb, yes I just did not realize that DIY is that much more appealing. ;) I already got more than half of the rigging from cajun ropes and I did take a splicing class two winters ago. The first rigger I called (Welcome | www.westriverrigging.com) said he closed business because he could barely recover the shop and insurance cost ($20k/year). And this second rigger basically priced himself out of doing a bigger job for the entire boat. I don't quite get the economics of it ;)

CalebD 07-19-2011 01:18 AM

When we got our Taran 27' about 8 years ago the PO spent the day with me and we replaced a sheet and and a halyard together. It was not difficult to do without going up the mast in a boasuns chair. There is also the trick of using a paper clip that has been bent into a double hook arrangement to grab each end of the line.
You don't really want a joint between the lines that is fatter so splicing might or might not work as well as just sewing the two bitter ends together and covering with the rigging tape of your choice.
I also really like to know how my running rigging lines are routed.
DIY makes sense to me.

sailjunkie 07-19-2011 01:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CalebD (Post 751802)
There is also the trick of using a paper clip that has been bent into a double hook arrangement to grab each end of the line.
You don't really want a joint between the lines that is fatter so splicing might or might not work as well as just sewing the two bitter ends together and covering with the rigging tape of your choice.
I also really like to know how my running rigging lines are routed.
DIY makes sense to me.

Unless the sheaves need replacement, DIY makes sense. I used whipping twine, to whip the end of each line, with a connecting loop. Covered it with duct tape (the handyman's secret weapon :D) and it went off smoothly. Took longer to scrape off the duct tape. ;)

JimsCAL 07-19-2011 10:32 AM

I replaced the main halyard and spin halyard on my previous boat. Had the eye splices done by Defender's rigging service and pulled them through using a light messenger with the mast up. Pretty easy job.

hellosailor 07-19-2011 08:55 PM

Zib, I'm with Caleb on this one. $300 worth of labor, hell, I'd be ashamed if it took me a single hour to replace an existing line with a new one. Buy an extra ten feet of line and a splicing kit and video, spend some time learning how to splice in whatever the end fitting will be and consider yourself well paid by the savings.

Or run a messenger line with the old halyard, then drop the new line and eye off at a shop and have someone make the splice. That surely can't cost more than $75....and you can still feed the new halyard "backwards" with the messenger line that way.

The rigger's time is certainly worth money, but three hours at a hundred apiece to run a halyard...I hope that includes a titanium shackle, because the price of gold is only $1600 an ounce these days and 24k plating doesn't need a dollar's worth of it.

Cal28 07-20-2011 02:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by zibadun (Post 751728)
I had an idea to hire out running rigging replacement on a 30ft sloop, with nothing fancy, just a double braid polyester. The estimate turned out to be 1700-2000+. So I told the rigger to replace just the main halyard for now (and I will do the rest by myself). He wants close to $500 for the halyard. This seems like at least 4x or 5x the cost of materials. Does this seem reasonable or am being taken for a ride?

I just spent an inordinate amount of time researching and then purchasing new running rigging. Fortunately I have all the original specs for my sailboat ... if you don't try looking here Sailboatdata.com is the worlds largest sailboat and sailing yacht database with more than 8000 sailboats, sailing yachts, and sailing dingies listed.

I'm modifying deck layout and running everything back to the cockpit ... no real existing hardware (I have to purchase) so it was relatively easy to spec size.

I sketched out each and every line ... measured what I could to determine what I wanted/needed ... read as many posts as I could here and on Cruiser's Forum and Anything Sailing regarding grade and quality ... personally spoke with 2 riggers and 3 chandleries ... got quotes from Cajun Rope (good place to look and compare notes as they have premade kits id'd for many size boats) and two other places as well as searching ebay for bulk ...

and in the end ... ending up purchasing at R&W Rope ... (as suggested by SailingDog somewhere here awhile ago) ... great helpful people and very competitive pricing ...

You might just give them a try ... (no affliation)

and yes ... do it yourself ... I'm 63 and not the most mechanically inclined ... but it sure aids in learning ...

hope this helps ...

John


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