leaky hatch, project? - Page 2 - SailNet Community
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #11 of 16 Old 10-17-2011
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: West Michigan
Posts: 515
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 12
 
can sometimes remove the plugs by drilling a pilot, then threading a screw into them. Other times, can chain drill a few holes in them and pop them out with a chisel
merc2dogs is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #12 of 16 Old 10-31-2011 Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
flo617's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: San Francisco bay
Posts: 133
Thanks: 7
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 6
 
Hatch is off!

Hi,

Thank you all for your help, I took the hatch off yesterday. It all went very easily. I covered the hole with a piece of white plastic sign cut to the hatch's dimensions, screwed and duck taped on the deck. It kind of looks better than the real hatch! This should keep cats from using my boat as a playground and keep most of the potential moisture from dripping in for now.


Most of the wood around the hatch was rotten and it didn't take much effort to begin removing it, especially around the corners. It doesn't look like the damage extends too far though. I'm no wood expert but I think the core is balsa, at least on this part of the boat.

I will probably dig a little further and glass it all before drilling completely through the deck and put in bolts instead of screws. At least this is my current idea unless someone here advises otherwise.

Another thing that did strike me was that on the port side, the bottom of the side has a piece of heavy cloth that didn't seem very well glassed in with some large gaps and obviously not much resin on it (see picture). Also, there is a good void between the plastic liner and the bottom of the cabin. There is a piece of something (too dark to see) that finally unite them somewhere down there and is probably a backing structure for the handrail. The curious thing is that there is no void of the starboard side. The wood trim on the forward bulkheads (where the hatch is located) show a little asymmetry too, so I assume that this dates back from the building of the boat.

Any comment on that?

Thank you,

Florent
Attached Thumbnails
hatch_cut1.jpg   hatch_cut2.jpg   hatch_cut3.jpg   hatch_cut4.jpg   hatch_cut5.JPG  

flo617 is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #13 of 16 Old 10-31-2011
Senior Moment Member
 
SloopJonB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: West Vancouver B.C.
Posts: 11,456
Thanks: 59
Thanked 69 Times in 66 Posts
Rep Power: 5
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by flo617 View Post
Most of the wood around the hatch was rotten and it didn't take much effort to begin removing it, especially around the corners. It doesn't look like the damage extends too far though. I'm no wood expert but I think the core is balsa, at least on this part of the boat.
It looks like balsa - I don't know of any other core material that looks like that so....

Quote:
Originally Posted by flo617 View Post
I will probably dig a little further and glass it all before drilling completely through the deck and put in bolts instead of screws. At least this is my current idea unless someone here advises otherwise.
Get a "wing" or skinny rabbeting cutter for your router and use it to cut back the balsa to good wood. I've also seen recommendations to simply use a bent piece of coathanger in a drill. After everything is cleaned up, pack it full of thickened epoxy, just like potting a fastener hole. Make sure the epoxy is THICK - like peanut butter so it won't slump out before curing. Running a strip of packing tape over the edge has worked for me - it peels away easily after things cure. Sand everything to clean it up and you're done.

Quote:
Originally Posted by flo617 View Post
Another thing that did strike me was that on the port side, the bottom of the side has a piece of heavy cloth that didn't seem very well glassed in with some large gaps and obviously not much resin on it (see picture). Also, there is a good void between the plastic liner and the bottom of the cabin. There is a piece of something (too dark to see) that finally unite them somewhere down there and is probably a backing structure for the handrail. The curious thing is that there is no void of the starboard side. The wood trim on the forward bulkheads (where the hatch is located) show a little asymmetry too, so I assume that this dates back from the building of the boat. Any comment on that? Thank you. Florent
Inner liners don't fit tight against the hull or deck except on the very highest quality boats in my experience. If you want to improve this area somewhat and the separate pieces are not held rigidly by other structure, pack the gap full of wetted out glass and clamp the liner and deck together. Do this before filling the edge of the deck core so you can do the finish work all at once.

I had the same situation where a small hatch had been added over the head on my boat. I did the above procedures, cleaned it up and then filled and finished it to a level that could be painted and didn't require any further trim to cover up the edges.

I, myself, personally intend to continue being outspoken and opinionated, intolerant of all fanatics, fools and ignoramuses, deeply suspicious of all those who have "found the answer" and on my bad days, downright rude.
SloopJonB is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #14 of 16 Old 10-31-2011
Senior Member
 
rugosa's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: In a strange land
Posts: 578
Thanks: 1
Thanked 10 Times in 10 Posts
Rep Power: 4
 
From staining on bulkhead looks like it has leaked for quite a while. Definitely looks like end grain balsa core. Since you have the job started dig out the balsa until there is no more black or wet material, air dry the cavity, then whip up some resin with chopped strand, pack it in. You could also prefab a board, maybe a piece of 1/2 or 3/4 plywood 4-6 wide and cut to the opening, fasten a wider strip on the end grain, cover the strip with masking tape or mold release and clamp it in place against the filler. Alternate material would be aluminum channel or square tube, but still needs to be waxed/mold released. It will mold the surface, be better looking if exposed permanently and avoid grinding and filling. Only problem is you probably will need to do front & back first and then the two sides in order to accommodate the clamps.

Filling the void will solidify the bond between the deck and subdeck, and give a solid fastening base as well. You mentioned bolting the hatch- if you are installing a new alloy framed hatch (Lewmar, Bomar, etc.) be careful not to overtighten as it will distort frame. I think they are designed to be screwed in, but for offshore concerns bolting makes sense.

The void between the underside of the deck and the top side of the liner is typical. Once you have finished your new trip should cover the void.

Welcome to the 'other' fun part of sailing
rugosa is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #15 of 16 Old 10-31-2011
Reward for lost Kraken!
 
hellosailor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 11,496
Thanks: 5
Thanked 133 Times in 130 Posts
Rep Power: 11
   
flo, the plugs are also called "bungs" and new ones should be available through woodworking or sailing catalogues and stores. Some folks prefer to get a plug-cutting drill bit and make their own, but I don't think that would be worth the bother for you.

Those voids definitely need to be cleaned out, all the way back to solid dry material, and filled. You can find articles on that archived at the West Systems (epoxy) aka Gougeon Brothers web site, they provide generous free advice and technical support to anyone who calls, even in the planning stage before you've bought anything from anyone.

You might want to look into deck coring problems a bit more before you get into the project, though. If you are lucky, it is only rotted/delaminting in a limited area, within some inches of the hatch. If the damage is more extensive--it can become a huge project. A tap hammer or a moisture meter are the usual tools to figure that out, although since you have access at the hatch, you might try simply ramming in a length of wire rod (heavy coat hangar) to see how far it penetrates, and how far back the damage goes.
hellosailor is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
post #16 of 16 Old 11-14-2011 Thread Starter
Senior Member
 
flo617's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: San Francisco bay
Posts: 133
Thanks: 7
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 6
 
I pretty much finished filling the core void. The rot didn't extend too far, at worst it was around 5 inches in one corner. I did quite a sloppy job I'm afraid and got some epoxy rain down on me but I guess that's how you learn. It's all filled up though and I hope that the repair will last. I am rushing before the rainy season settles in and I only have week-ends to work on it.

I guess my concern was less with the liner void and more with the big cloth that is not so well laminated and kind of dry. Also, is there a way to know what composes layers of the laminate (roving, chopped fibers etc...) by just looking at it?
flo617 is offline  
Quote Quick Reply Share with Facebook
Reply

Tags
columbia , columbia29 , hatch , leak , leaky

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.


User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Leaky Keel itsme6582 Gear & Maintenance 8 03-28-2010 10:06 AM
leaky hatch gaskets. eskimo1941 General Discussion (sailing related) 7 12-15-2009 02:05 PM
Leaky hatch. Perithead Gear & Maintenance 1 03-23-2008 09:32 AM
leaky bomar deck hatch on 29 mk 2 hiatus C & C 1 09-24-2006 01:45 PM
leaky shaft log captbruce Gear & Maintenance 1 09-06-2002 04:44 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome