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  #11  
Old 10-25-2011
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Good luck getting past the Rudder Eh! But I have to say the most difficult part of the job on my boat was digging the whole in the ground for the post to clear the bottom LOL The quadrant through bolt is the only bolt that actually keeps the whole thing up in the tube.
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Old 10-25-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eherlihy View Post
Denise, I think that I can squeak by the rudder (I hope so!). My boat is a 35, and I believe that I have more room between the shaft log and the rudder.
It ain't pretty, but the prop shaft is OUT.

I tried to use a gear puller, but no dice. The prop shaft was too long for the gear puller.
So, I cut ˝" of the threads off the shaft. Still too long, so I cut another ˝".

STILL too long , so I cut them flush with the rear of the prop.

I cranked on the gear puller as much as I dared, but the prop wouldn't budge. The prop and the shaft were solidly fused. At this point I was committed to a new shaft anyway, so I cut the shaft forward of the cutlass bearing, and slid it out. Then I went into the engine compartment, and cut 2/3 of the way through the shaft, and the battery in my portable sawzall died.

I finished up with a hack saw. Has anyone ever told you how soft 1" of brass is? If so, they're lying. It took me close to 30 min to cut the other third... I now have 6 pieces of shaft.

Unfortunately Denise is right, the rudder will have to drop to replace the shaft.
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Old 10-25-2011
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It's dirty,greasy, and you need to contort yourself into some pretty undignified positions but it's not really difficult, This will also give you a chance to really work on the rudder too. I want to take mine home this winter and save it before it needs saving LOL
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Old 10-25-2011
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In an odd, twisted way, I envy you yankees. Here in the southlands, the sailing season never actually ends. Any time I take an opportunity to work on the boat, it means I'm missing an opportunity to be on the water.

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Old 10-25-2011
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Originally Posted by deniseO30 View Post
It's dirty,greasy, and you need to contort yourself into some pretty undignified positions but it's not really difficult, This will also give you a chance to really work on the rudder too. I want to take mine home this winter and save it before it needs saving LOL
Denise, you want to take your RUDDER home?

Have you ever considered a pet?
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Old 10-26-2011
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Done this job several time over the last 25 years. Needed to drop the rudder on my previous boat to get the shaft out. As Denise says, definitely the hardest part of the job, especially in a boatyard where the ground is compacted from years of boat storage and LOTS of rocks. Luckily CAL got clever in the design of my current boat (33-2) and offset the shaftline just enough to slide past the rudder.

The length of the shaft is critical, so don't lose any of the pieces!

Last edited by JimsCAL; 10-26-2011 at 09:53 AM.
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Old 10-26-2011
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Here is a source for bronze:
Atlas Metal Sales
Here are the various specs for Silicon Bronze. 96% CU, 3% SI . Try
commercail spec SAE CA655. There are other types of silicon bronze with
Zinc so be careful if you have galvanic problems. This material is great
for low velocity seawater. With stainless steel, there is the real problem of severe pit corrosion because the cutless bearing prevents oxygen from getting to the stainless to form the corrosion resistance from chromium dioxide. Without oxygen stainless has the resistance of ordinary steel to corrosion. Also, keel bolts should not be stainless for the same reason. Silicon bronze bolts must be used. Even galvanized is better than stainless bolts for bolting on a keel.
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Old 10-26-2011
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O'day 35 shaft (getting the shaft?) work

Hey,

I went through most of what you are going through in the winter of 2009 / spring 2010. The stuffing box hose on my boat was original, and UGLY. Also, the cutless bearing was worn, so it was time to fix everything.

As you know, you do need to remove the rudder. That can be a real PITA. Digging the hole is work, but not terrible (at least for me it wasn't), but you need to dig a DEEP hole. There are a few bolts that hold the quadrant together, but you must MUST remove the long bolt that goes through the quadrant and rudder post. On my boat, that bolt would not come out at all. I had to use a small sledgehammer to drive it out, and of course it got destroyed. Do take the time to bring the rudder home and let it really dry out.

Back to the boat: I tried to remove the coupling bolts and then gave up. I ended up paying the yard guys to do the work. They just cut everything off with a saw and replaced with new. For about $1000 I got:
  • New SS prop shaft
  • 3 blade prop reconditioned
  • new cutless bearing
  • new stuffing box hose (box was fine)
  • all installed nicely with new hardware

IMHO that was a bargain. I did put the rudder back on and that was easier than taking it out.

Last point - my boat came with a driversaver, which worked fine and was reused.

Good luck,
Barry
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Last edited by BarryL; 10-26-2011 at 10:05 PM.
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Old 10-26-2011
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Yes take the rudder home drill it full of holes and bag it, and connect it to a vac pump and really dry out the insides. then give a full wrap of cloth and resin.
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Old 10-26-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LakeSuperiorGeezer View Post
Here is a source for bronze:
Atlas Metal Sales
Here are the various specs for Silicon Bronze. 96% CU, 3% SI . Try
commercial spec SAE CA655. There are other types of silicon bronze with
Zinc so be careful if you have galvanic problems. This material is great
for low velocity seawater. With stainless steel, there is the real problem of severe pit corrosion because the cutless bearing prevents oxygen from getting to the stainless to form the corrosion resistance from chromium dioxide. Without oxygen stainless has the resistance of ordinary steel to corrosion. Also, keel bolts should not be stainless for the same reason. Silicon bronze bolts must be used. Even galvanized is better than stainless bolts for bolting on a keel.
The shafts used in salt water are not typical stainless, unless ordered from unrepeatable businesses, they are Aqualoy 22. They are MUCH more resistant to crevice and pitting corrosion than 304, 316 or the lesser AQ or Monel variants.

Most of the shafting used from 1982 on called "bronze" was a very high zinc content product intended for industrial pump shafting. Much of it lacked the tin content to help it resists dezincification as we can see in the pics I posted above.. That shaft came off a 1984 Sabre. This shafting is rarely ever straight enough to meet industry spec and much of it did not meet the ABYC P-06 strength standards for shafting.

When Anaconda filed for bankruptcy in 1982 or so, so went the patent for Tobin bronze which is what the good quality marine shafting was made of. No one ever bought the patent because there was no sense in competing with the Nitronic or AQ variants that were coming on-line and are stronger performers in both strength and corrosion resistance.

Keep in mind that if you buy raw bronze bar stock it will most likely not be straightened to ABYC P-6 standards and you'll very likely incur a large time/labor charge to get it to within tolerance spec. The AQ 22 in the size the OP needs is shipped straightened to within 0.003" and both Roses and NE Prop makes sure it is within spec before it leaves the shop...

Bronze shafting is also considerably more prone to "shaft whip", which results in more vibrations, especially when folding or feathering props are added and the distance from the bearing moves aft. While shaft whip may not be an issue with a very short shaft the Oday's have rather long shafts, with long unsupported distances, that can get whippy.

The two largest keel suppliers in North America still use quality stainless steel keel bolts of both 304 and 316L. 2205 or other variants can be supplied as an up charge but it is a very rare request. Neither do much of anything with bronze and the largest keel manufacturer won't generally use them in sizes under 1 1/2" diameter.....
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Last edited by Maine Sail; 10-26-2011 at 04:22 PM.
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