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  #11  
Old 11-13-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SloopJonB View Post
Is that the system where vertical lines are threaded through grommets in the sail? Kind of like a suspension bridge cabling?

If so (even if not) what was the cost? Any downside or inconveniences?
Yes. Here's a link from Doyle Sailmakers on the system.

Doyle Sailmakers: Dutchman

Main disadvantage is that removing the main in the fall and installing in the spring is a bit more involved. The special topping lift wire with the monofilament lines must be removed and coiled. When I priced a new main last year, I got a quote of $800 to install a Dutchman system from North.
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  #12  
Old 11-13-2011
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I have the Mack sails version the "Mack Pack" and am happy with it.

I slacken the lazy jacks off and bungee them forward to the mast before raising the sail which means no battens get caught as you hoist.

If you have a crew on the helm that keeps you dead into wind as you hoist you can avoid this.
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  #13  
Old 11-13-2011
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I was under the impression that the lazy jack lines held the canvas cover upright and in place. If you slack the lines and pull them forword for raising the sail, what shape does the cover take? Does it fall away? Will the sails droop?
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  #14  
Old 11-13-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael K View Post
I've heard that full battens hang up on lazyjacks a bit too often when raising a mainsail. To remedy that problem some have anchored the top end of the jacks to the spreaders, creating a "V". I'll be trying this approach on a new rig next Spring.
My lazyjacks are threaded thru holes a little ways out on the spreaders, but not sure it helps that muck; they can still snag the batten ends. When ordering my Mackpack, Mack cautioned me that under some conditions (off the wind) if the lazyjacks are attached too far out there may be an undesirable force on the spreader that it is not designed for.
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Old 11-13-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cvsheppard View Post
I was under the impression that the lazy jack lines held the canvas cover upright and in place. If you slack the lines and pull them forword for raising the sail, what shape does the cover take? Does it fall away? Will the sails droop?
Yes the sail does flop off the boom at the rear of the boom when I slack the lazyjacks but as I hoist the sail after doing this it is not a problem.

The cover only flaps if I undo the mast fixings.
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Old 11-14-2011
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It would imagine that with the stack-pack or Mack-pack bag one advantage is not having the sails stowed away so tightly allowing them to breathe more and lightening the creases.
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Old 11-14-2011
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My Catalina came factory with the Dutchman system. I like it better then lazy jack systems we have used in the past.

It does not help with making a quick exit from the boat after a day of sailing. You still have to put on a traditional sail cover that can be slightly more complicated due to the monofilament lines. Also, taking the sails off and putting them back on is a little more complicated. However, that system can be made easier. We have a line that the monofilament is attached to that can be disconnected from the topping lift and be stored with the sail. So you don't have to re-thread the monofilament each year.

One of the negatives I have heard about for the stack-pack/Mack-pack type of set up is that they can flap and be loud while under sail. Also, they limit the ability to have reef points for the mainsail.

If i were to pick, I would stay with the Dutchman.
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Old 11-14-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JKCatalina310 View Post
One of the negatives I have heard about for the stack-pack/Mack-pack type of set up is that they can flap and be loud while under sail. Also, they limit the ability to have reef points for the mainsail.
That system is only an enhancement of age old lazyjacks. How does it limit reefing?
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Old 11-15-2011
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I have had dutchman on 3 boats including the one I own now. I have had the Harken lazy jacks on one boat and took it off and did without rather than mess with them. I do like the dutchman, but replaced the monofilament with 1/16" vinyl SS wire. It does not stretch and make the system work a lot smoother. I can literally drop the sail and tie it off to the boom. Very little effort compared to fighting it when loose. My vote is Dutchman, though the parts are ridiculously expensive.
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  #20  
Old 11-15-2011
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We had a stackpack style cover made and after a few modifications I really like it. There are a few negatives which I'll list first. The cover remains in place while sailing and on the windward side it bellows out a bit, never flaps or makes noise but obviously disrupts air flow somewhat. At the mast the cover attaches to the mast so you have to undo it to access the reefing hooks, not a big deal but makes it fractionally more difficult to hook the sail. On the plus side it's super easy to use, just zip it open to raise the main and when you drop it just pull in the reefing lines and zip it back up. Couldn't be simpler which means that we use the main more often than we used to for short sails and we also cover the main whenever we aren't using it (we used to leave the cover off while cruising unless we were anchored up somewhere for a few days). I wouldn't bother with one if I was going offshore, but for coastal cruising I wouldn't go back to a normal main cover.
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