Weird main sail halyard splicing / termination - SailNet Community

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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance
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  #1  
Old 11-14-2011
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Weird main sail halyard splicing / termination

I am replacing my main halyard which seems to be an older Aramid 85 rope either 7/16" or 1/2" diameter in apparent very good condition with practically no wear or damage on the outer layer/braid but the rope is very stiff and difficult to handle especially when winching as it keeps on popping up from the self tailing winch. What I find most weird about this halyard is the splice that was made to attach the shackle on it. In essence the last (or the first, which ever way you look at it) three feet of the halyard is in fact the core that was extracted from the outer sheath and a shackle attached to it with some seizing twine. I find this the most amazing thing because the last three feet of the halyard gets the most of the friction and bashing s why would you use the unprotected core for this?
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Old 11-15-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Petar View Post
I am replacing my main halyard which seems to be an older Aramid 85 rope either 7/16" or 1/2" diameter in apparent very good condition with practically no wear or damage on the outer layer/braid but the rope is very stiff and difficult to handle especially when winching as it keeps on popping up from the self tailing winch. What I find most weird about this halyard is the splice that was made to attach the shackle on it. In essence the last (or the first, which ever way you look at it) three feet of the halyard is in fact the core that was extracted from the outer sheath and a shackle attached to it with some seizing twine. I find this the most amazing thing because the last three feet of the halyard gets the most of the friction and bashing s why would you use the unprotected core for this?
Maybe there has been a wire/rope halyard there before? The Rope with cover and core might have to large diameter to fit the masthead sheave?

Have you tried to give the rope a tour in the washing machine?

It's not uncommon to remove the cover on part of dyneema ropes (Rope with dyneem core and polyester cover).
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Old 11-15-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by knuterikt View Post
Maybe there has been a wire/rope halyard there before? The Rope with cover and core might have to large diameter to fit the masthead sheave?


It's not uncommon to remove the cover on part of dyneema ropes (Rope with dyneem core and polyester cover).
You are right about stripping the cover off high tech rope, but sheave size wouldn't have dictated removal of the cover of only 3 feet of halyard; the full size halyard would still need to round the sheave.

My guess is that the splicer responsible did not want to go to the trouble of a core dependent splice. It is indeed more difficult. He should have used an eye splice rather than a seizing, and I would wonder if he properly "stripped the cover". You also should secure the cover to the core wherever on the halyard a rope clutch might be engaged.
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Old 11-16-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ggray View Post
You are right about stripping the cover off high tech rope, but sheave size wouldn't have dictated removal of the cover of only 3 feet of halyard; the full size halyard would still need to round the sheave.
Thanks for correcting me

Quote:
Originally Posted by ggray View Post
My guess is that the splicer responsible did not want to go to the trouble of a core dependent splice. It is indeed more difficult. He should have used an eye splice rather than a seizing, and I would wonder if he properly "stripped the cover". You also should secure the cover to the core wherever on the halyard a rope clutch might be engaged.
I do not agree with you on "It is indeed more difficult."
A naked core dependent splice is on of the easiest to do
Same splice as in theses videos with a small modification.

Modified Brummel Splice, Part 1 - YouTube
Modified Brummel Splice Part 2 - YouTube

Put a butterfly knot 3 meters from the end of the rope.
Push the cover towards the knot so you have enough "naked" core to do the splice.
After finishing the splice push the cover back towards the splice while removing the excess cover, I use a scissor for this. (careful with heat as dyneema has low melting point).
Finish with a sewn whipping at the throat of the splice to keep the cover in place.
Picture of the finished splice.


Here is a picture of a stripped cover
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Old 11-16-2011
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You are right about a "naked core" eye splice of just the hollow core.
But I was referring to a core dependent splice per Sampson instructions, especially compared to the seizing he had, but even to what you have.
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Old 11-17-2011
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To the OP, wash the halyard, add a little fabric softener to it. Rinse very well. Should help.

The stripped cover at the end is probably b/c it wouldn't fit in the mast head sheave when spliced. So they removed the cover, making the splice much more compact. I agree, this wasn't the best choice at all. Adding some cover to the end might be worth doing.
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Old 11-17-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ggray View Post
You are right about a "naked core" eye splice of just the hollow core.
But I was referring to a core dependent splice per Sampson instructions, especially compared to the seizing he had, but even to what you have.
The "naked eye splice" give the same strength as the "core dependent splice per Sampson instructions" since it's only the core that carry the load in these ropes. The only difference that you miss the chafe/UV protection.
It's best to select a rope where the dyneema core have UV coating for this application.

The "core dependent splice per Sampson instructions" can be difficult to do on ropes where the cover is tightly woven.

On alternative way to retain the cover on the splice is this variety (on FSE robline Admiral)

It's basically the same splice as "core dependent splice per Sampson instructions" but cover is not buried but attached with a whipping.
This is a fully acceptable way of doing it since the cover does not carry any load.
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