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  #21  
Old 01-02-2012
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Wow. Just wow.
:-)
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  #22  
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After assembling my cockpit grate by gluing and using a finish nailer, I put three coats of clear epoxy over top and bottom to seal it. Then followed up with three coats of spar varnish. At the same time I was making the grate, I made new mahogany handrails for the cabintop and refinished the mahogany trim around the companionway. I DID NOT put any epoxy on those items...just spar varnish..several coats. Result...the grate looks brand new after one year in Texas sun. The varnish only items will need a touch-up this spring.
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After trying everything on our wood (varnish, cetol, etc, etc), the best stuff is Australian Timber Oil (Cabot Stains | Cabot). Other oils carbonize, but this has a different base and is water soluble, and is an oil and is relatively easily to apply. It's not marketed as a "marine" product, we just buy it at Lowe's. Just re-oil once/year to maintain.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RichH View Post
Cetol is essentially a clear, moderately pigmented (ferrous oxide) enamel that eventually cracks upon 'build up'. .... its a royal ass-pain to remove.
Many of the 'modern' coatings (Bristol, Honey Teak, Smith & Co. etc. etc. use varying % of ferrous oxide as their UV blockers but the higher the % of ferrous oxide the less transparency of the coating which 'hides' the beauty of the wood grain ... and are typically co-polymers of urethane and acrylic or an 'epoxide' hence the 'mega-gloss'. Original Cetol is similar to a 'weak' brown enamel 'paint'.

Its the UV blocking that protects against the destruction of the surface wood cells that makes the 'modern' coatings so long lasting. I use Honey Teak (very expensive) applied 'thick' and the base coat lasts upwards of 10-12 years, a quick yearly or every two year maintenance clear coat is needed .... looks 'almost' like a prime varnish job and can be 'power-buffed' (to develop the glowing iridescent 'patina' of the wood cells) and doesnt look like 'paint'.
C'mon Rich - tell us what you REALLY think of Cetol.
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Originally Posted by RichH View Post
I too would rate a prime varnish job as the ultimate, especially when its 'finished' to perfection (top sprayed, hand rubbed, and then polished etc.) .... too bad that life is too short to be a slave to varnish. Unless the wood is totally sealed vs. moisture ultimately the combo of moisture migration through the wood and UV is going to kill varnish.

Ive posted this before .... a 10+ year old Honey Teak job ... Id rather be sailing.
You didn't mention that using Honey Teak leaves you enough time to keep your exterior bronze polished like gold!
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mmmmm. that bronze was mirror polished with jewelers rouge applied onto high speed fabric wheels then had 4+ coats of HT clear applied ... such will last about 4-5 years. Power tools are your friends, even on boats.
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Tried an experiment back on San Francisco bay with a buddy who owned a sister boat to my c27. He used Bristol Finish. I used 3-4 coats clear epoxy (1'st 2 coats thinned); then 3-4 coats clear 2-part polyurethane. My buddy was done soon and it was gorgeous. I took much, much longer (did I say much?). Epoxy/poly result: stunning. The epoxy/poly lasted over 2 yrs. (then light sand & addit coat, just because - didn't need it). Bristol needed recoating in a year. That said, we had a neighbor in an old Choey Lee with stunning exterior teak. We had to inquire. It was 4 yrs old. Yup, Honey Teak.
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mmmmm. that bronze was mirror polished with jewelers rouge applied onto high speed fabric wheels then had 4+ coats of HT clear applied ... such will last about 4-5 years. Power tools are your friends, even on boats.
Rich, tell me more. What tool did you use? A Dremel type with the hardware in place or a buffing wheel on the dismounted hardware? What RPM?

I have a long shaft polisher - like a bench grinder with long arms. It runs off a 1725 1/2 horse Baldor. I've done a lot of polishing & buffing of brass, bronze, aluminium & S/S. I get great results using the coarser polishes - green, tripoli, white etc but I've never been able to get rouge to work properly on it. I have a 10" loose wheel specifically for that stage of buffing but when I use rouge on it I just get black streaks of compound on the workpiece.

Can you advise where I'm going wrong?
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I have had great success with rouge, using a variety of tools including an electric drill (!) and a drill press(!!). They key for me was having the correct buffing wheel, which is dedicated to rouge. In fact, I have a range of buffing wheels ("mops"), each used for a specific grade of polish; they are easy to swap out as they screw into a conical threaded "hub". For rouge I use a very soft mop called "swansdown", sold in UK and Australia, made of calico...
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Originally Posted by SloopJonB View Post
Rich, tell me more. What tool did you use? A Dremel type with the hardware in place or a buffing wheel on the dismounted hardware? What RPM?

I have a long shaft polisher - like a bench grinder with long arms. It runs off a 1725 1/2 horse Baldor. I've done a lot of polishing & buffing of brass, bronze, aluminium & S/S. I get great results using the coarser polishes - green, tripoli, white etc but I've never been able to get rouge to work properly on it. I have a 10" loose wheel specifically for that stage of buffing but when I use rouge on it I just get black streaks of compound on the workpiece.

Can you advise where I'm going wrong?
It makes a huge difference if the bronze has verdigris on it or not, rouge will never work with green verdigris present. To remove verdigris (or even the brown copper oxide) soak the part in citric acid (lemon juice if you cant get citric) .... If you cant remove the part soak the citric in absorbent cotton, apply and cover with saran wrap ... it does take some time to dissolve the verdigris.

Then, sand down to remove pits, roughness, etc. I prefer the 3M face discs made with their abrasive 'purple and green' pad abrasive. Hand sand down with 300-->100 grit emory; down to 600 W&D, then polish with jewelers rouge. You can use "Flitz" on the final polish.
Yes I use hand drills, and dremels with rotating fabric wheels on the non-removable parts and just a 'bench grinder' with cloth polishing wheels if the part is removable.

If possible, the part should be entirely coated as if you dont the oxidation will propagate from the 'backside' through screw/boltholes, etc. after a few years. My next trial/attempt with removable parts will be heavy clear 'powder coating' after mirror polishing.
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