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  #11  
Old 01-05-2012
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Here is Don Casey's take on blister repair on the Boat/U.S. site: Blister Repair by Don Casey

I recommend both of his books, "This Old Boat", and "Complete Illustrated Sailboat Maintenance Manual".

You may have a real case of boat pox, which requires drying out the hull thoroughly and may require professional help (I remain skeptical of your first professional opinion for not fully explaining why addressing the blisters individually would not work). In fact, I believe any lasting repair will require a thorough drying out of the hull - I would not be surprised if some of the current hull problems might be due to the epoxy barrier coat being applied to a not-thoroughly dried hull. You might reconcile yourself to the idea of leaving your boat out this Spring and Summer for a full repair, looking forward to the Fall sailing season.

In "This Old Boat", p. 353, Don Casey discusses using marine alkyd enamel instead of epoxy paint after blister repair. The problem with epoxy is that it will hold water in as well as it will hold water out. Then you can end up with the problem you now have - water between the gelcoat and the barrier coat.

Perhaps you should get a second opinion from another marine professional. Don Casey estimates $300 a foot for the peel and replace method (in 2006) or $11,100 for your Crealock 37. You might also consider trying to find someone outside of the Solomon's Island market, which tends to be a little more expensive (although not as much as Annapolis or Baltimore) than the more rural areas of the Bay, or Tidewater.

Last edited by jameswilson29; 01-05-2012 at 09:23 AM.
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Old 01-05-2012
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I had this happen to a 30' powerboat many years ago.
If there are that many blisters your best bet would be to hire someone to blast the bottom to open up the blisters. The reason I say blast is you'll spend the rest of your life grinding them out. Also by blasting NOW, your boat will an opportunity to dry out over the winter, if moisture is in the laminate, so that maybe by mid summer you'll be able to tackle the balance of your repair. Be sure to have someone sound the hull with a moisture meter prior to filling in the pox.

We blasted in November & the boat wasn't dry enough to begin repairs until June...

Bob
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Old 01-05-2012
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Still looking for a "blisters sink boat" thread
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Old 01-05-2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by deniseO30 View Post
Still looking for a "blisters sink boat" thread
I'm not sure they'll sink but you have to raise the water line monthly

When we had trouble with our boat I began to notice the water line being submerged half way thru the season. I'd jump on the boat & hit the bilge pump thinking the float wasn't working. Wasn't until I pulled her in the fall
that I realized what was really going on.

Bob
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Old 01-05-2012
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boats and women have allot more in common! Water retention! eek!
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Old 01-05-2012
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Untreated the problem may progress over time, becoming deeper or more widespread, as in the OP's boat. While the boat may not sink from it, it could affect the value of the boat. One would assume a saturated hull would not have the same strength as a normal moisture fiberglass hull, especially over time as the hull flexes, and could cause collateral structural damage, separation between the bulkheads and the hull, leaking or damaged through-hulls, etc.

I would assume the bumps could also affect boat speed through the water.
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Old 01-05-2012
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Misfits: im going to have to throw the BS flag on that last post!
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Old 01-05-2012
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In 99.9% of cases blisters are in the gelcoat and are cosmetic. It is incredibly rare for there to be any structural damage resulting from blisters. It sure does scare a lot of people into spending thousands of dollars or doing the job themselves with a great deal of labor and some expense though. A hull will not absorb much water - certainly not enough to lower the waterline by a material amount.

Here's an interesting article concerning blisters: Sea Lake Yacht Sales (Kemah, TX)
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Old 01-06-2012
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blisters

I highly recommend David Pascoe's articles ....

Hull Blisters on Boats and Yachts - by David Pascoe, Marine Surveyor
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Old 01-06-2012
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Broke
As others have noted hull blistering is not going to sink the boat.

This haul-out, ignore the small blisters, open and sand/scrape out the larger ones and leave open until the weather warms.

In the spring epoxy fill the larger ones and only use one coat of ablative, go sailing.

Next haul-out remove all the ablative to solid gelcoat or barrier coat open the blisters, sand and scrape before the winter settles in. In the spring epoxy fill the divots temperature permitting, fair and sand, barrier coat and whatever antifouling coat works for your waters.

If you race and want to win or just want the prettiest boat in the marina then get a professional to soda blast, repair, fair and some superior finish system.
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