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  #11  
Old 01-08-2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by klem View Post
What model boat is it/what is the hull shape?
It is a Pearson 27. I think it is what they refer to as an IOR shape from the mid 1980's.


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I have always used a rule of thumb that if I have to ask others how to do something since I can't figure it out myself, maybe I shouldn't be doing it.
Surely you aren't serious? I have a rule of thumb that is exactly the opposite. If I have run the various possible solutions to a problem through my head and cannot find an adequate answer, that is the time that I reach out to others with more experience.

I think I understand your intended meaning though. I will be badgering the marina owner until he does allow me to pay him to haul it out.

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Have you called around and seen whether there are any other local hauling companies? There are many ways to haul a boat depending on the setup including trailer, crane, forklift, marine railway etc.
I have, and I wish there were more options. Central Arkansas is an isolated area when it comes to sailing support. I am finding it takes commitment to be a sailor here. If it weren't for the long sailing season and the beautiful lakes I wouldn't even consider it. Well, I probably would since I have been rendered insane by a sailing bug bite. I am happy to live in an era that I have access to the internet and the great people on SailNet.

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Good luck.
Thanks.
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  #12  
Old 01-08-2012
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Originally Posted by itsaboat View Post
Thanks James. Good luck with your repair. Be sure to post some pics so I can see how to do it right.

Here are the photos: SailNet Community - jameswilson29's Album: Winter repairs: replace stuffing box hose - Picture

Here is my advice: cut the propeller shaft and replace everything aft of the transmission, coupling, propeller shaft, cutlass bearing.
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  #13  
Old 01-08-2012
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itsaboat,

My PSS rotor was secured with two threaded holes, 4 screws in total (inner pair to lock against the shaft, outer pair to lock in inner pair). As the motor is engaged into forward or reverse - depending on the engine mounts the engine shifts, which moves the bellows against the motor. In my case I can only assume the screws were not installed tight enough; over time the rotor worked itself slightly loose, until finally there was no grip so as the engine reversed it slipped back, letting water flood in.

BTW, as you probably know, the set screws are a one-time use thing as they have a "sharp" rim to "bite" into the prop shaft - maybe my prop shaft is unusually hard? - anyway, here is another excellent photo from the Compass Marine site to illustrate:


The additional collar uses much bigger screws to clamp firmly on to the shaft.
(with thanks to Maine Sail...)
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Old 01-08-2012
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I prefer KISS to finicky parts in inaccessible locations, so I'd ask just how bad the stuffing box is, and whether gore-tex packing in a conventional tube might not be preferable to a PSS system. If you go with PSS, those set screws are the reason that Loctite cleaner and threadlock were invented, invest ten bucks in making sure they stay put.

The toilet wax rings work very well but if you're taking out the whole tube and dropping the shaft, that's a lot of potential for getting stuck and having the boat ashore in case you get stuck overnight would be a nice idea. Or at least, have a good set of damage control plugs available so you can literally hammer in some protection if you need to leave the boat with the shaft out overnight.

If the profile of the boat's bottom and the dockside/shore work out, you probably can weight down the bow until the stern comes out, or use floats to raise the stern out. From 15-gallon heavy plastic chemical barrels (free "garbage" behind photoprocessing labs and some food packers) to used 55-gallon drums, you can often get some kind of flotation for free. Tied together, slipped under the hull and hauled forward, they can raise the stern but...if you can find someplace to just haul the boat and put it on stands, that might be the most effective thing to do. Certainly the most "relaxed" way to work when the job is a first-timer and may get complications.
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Working under a live load is a VERY BAD idea. What about finding a nice sand beach and careening the boat?

Last edited by jpqincny; 01-08-2012 at 03:07 PM. Reason: correction
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Old 01-08-2012
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Thanks all for the input. As it stands right now, I am going to haul out and do it the safe and correct way as soon as I can.

Thanks, James, for the pics of your replacement. That looked like a son-of-a-bitch to repair. I hope that mine is more straightforward!

MainSail cautions against reusing the same coupler, but I am planning on doing just that to avoid ordering a new one and dealing with machine shops. Here is a picture of the current coupler.


The Volvo setup on the Pearson is what looks like a bronze shaft and bronze coupler attached to a rubber or plastic vibration damper before the transmission. Is this more-or-less self aligning?
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Old 01-08-2012
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That's all pretty tight.. I doubt you'll have room for the insurance collar, and you may need to check the overall length of the bellows hose/seal assy against your current stuffing box to be certain you can get that all in.

Also.. I wonder if there's any issues putting the SS lock collar(s) onto a bronze shaft.... Could be given the age of the boat and the effort you'll be going to you may as well replace with SS? (do it right, do it once??)

On the plus side it all looks pretty clean and should come apart easily enough!
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That's all pretty tight.. I doubt you'll have room for the insurance collar, and you may need to check the overall length of the bellows hose/seal assy against your current stuffing box to be certain you can get that all in.
I think that I can fit it in. That picture is a bit misleading. According to the PYI/PSS specs, the compressed length of the seal is 6 1/4". The current tube itself is 6", and that is not including the stuffing box which adds at least 3" or so. The picture below gives a better idea of scale.

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Also.. I wonder if there's any issues putting the SS lock collar(s) onto a bronze shaft.... Could be given the age of the boat and the effort you'll be going to you may as well replace with SS? (do it right, do it once??)
That's a good thought. I am just reluctant to go to the trouble and expense of replacing the whole prop/shaft assembly all because a 6" radiator hose rotted away. I want to do it right, but I have to balance cost and what is necessary to get everything working. It is a 26 year old boat after all.

It seems like the only SS contact with the shaft will be the set screws of the dripless system. I did not think about the SS/bronze issue. I might wait and reconsider the lock collar. It can always be added later.
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Old 01-08-2012
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About $30 buys a new hose for the existing stuffing box. The first lasted a few decades probably.
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  #20  
Old 01-08-2012
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About $30 buys a new hose for the existing stuffing box. The first lasted a few decades probably.
True. If someone made a safe, effective two-piece hose that I could replace it with and avoid all of the shaft coupler issues I don't know how much I would pay!
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