carbon monoxide risk from propane stove?? - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance
 Not a Member? 


Like Tree8Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 01-15-2012
nodders's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: toronto, Ontario
Posts: 134
Thanks: 0
Thanked 5 Times in 3 Posts
Rep Power: 3
nodders is on a distinguished road
carbon monoxide risk from propane stove??

I tossed out an old pressure alcohol stove today that was on the boat I purchased. I am planning to replace it for a while with a 2 burner propane camp stove I have, but the manual advises against using it in enclosed spaces due to carbon monoxide. I have seen stoves like this used on boats and wondering if there really is that much of a risk?
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 01-15-2012
Faster's Avatar
Just another Moderator
 
Join Date: Sep 2005
Location: New Westminster, BC
Posts: 14,604
Thanks: 67
Thanked 178 Times in 174 Posts
Rep Power: 10
Faster has a spectacular aura about Faster has a spectacular aura about Faster has a spectacular aura about
Any open, unvented flame is going to present a 'risk' of CO due to the less than ideal/complete combustion that occurs stove-top. Any time you're using a stove like that it's wise to have a bit of ventilation source somewhere. Normally the short term use to prepare dinner or coffee is not likely to be especially dangerous.

Those that like to use such a stove as a heat source run a much higher risk.

You likely had the a similar risk with the alcohol stove.

However the other issue with your planned setup is that it probably involves using the green bottles rather than a properly installed propane system (vented tank storage, solenoid, etc etc) Please don't store your unused or partial bottles below. They can leak and without a 'sniffer' such a leak could prove disastrous.

Use common sense and careful practice.. and/or bite the bullet and put in a proper setup.
__________________
Ron

1984 Fast/Nicholson 345 "FastForward"

".. there is much you could do at sea with common sense.. and very little you could do without it.."
Capt G E Ericson (from "The Cruel Sea" by Nicholas Monsarrat)
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 01-15-2012
RobGallagher's Avatar
HANUMAN
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Noank, Connecticut, USA
Posts: 1,314
Thanks: 7
Thanked 12 Times in 11 Posts
Rep Power: 13
RobGallagher is on a distinguished road
For less than 30 bucks you can buy a combo smoke detector and CO alarm. If you are heating, cooking or running the engine while down below it's a good idea to have one.

If you are sleeping down below it's a must. No wiring, it can be hung with a sticky and probably comes with a battery.

You have one in your house... don't you? I mean, everyone has one, right? Only a fool...
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 01-15-2012
chef2sail's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Maryland
Posts: 6,828
Thanks: 28
Thanked 53 Times in 49 Posts
Rep Power: 7
chef2sail will become famous soon enough
Send a message via AIM to chef2sail
Quote:
However the other issue with your planned setup is that it probably involves using the green bottles rather than a properly installed propane system (vented tank storage, solenoid, etc etc) Please don't store your unused or partial bottles below. They can leak and without a 'sniffer' such a leak could prove disastrous- Faster
As Faster said this is the greatest risk. The 1lb bombs should be stored in a vented locker or bag topside after using. The needles in them have been known to stick open

Dave
sawingknots likes this.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
___________________________
S/V Haleakala (Hawaiian for" House of the Sun")
C&C 35 MKIII Hull # 76
Parkville, Maryland
(photos by Joe McCary)
Charter member of the Chesapeake Lion posse

Our blog-
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


“Sailing is just the bottom line, like adding up the score in bridge. My real interest is in the tremendous game of life.”- Dennis Conner
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 01-15-2012
hellosailor's Avatar
Plausible Deniability
 
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 10,418
Thanks: 1
Thanked 74 Times in 72 Posts
Rep Power: 10
hellosailor has a spectacular aura about hellosailor has a spectacular aura about
Just about any flame produces some CO. Given that the conmbustion products will be hot, most of us don't worry about CO from cooking during waking hours with normal ventilation, at home or afloat. But a CO detector IS good insurance, especially if you may light the stove while the hatches are buttoned up on a cold day.

The single-burner butane stoves found in oriential groceries for $20 or so, and the more expensive propane camping stoves, work. The problem is those "The 1lb bombs ". Typical propane/butane bottles just have a rubber ball stopping the gas from coming out, so they should not be stored down below. The propane bottles have an advantage in that you can buy bronze screw caps for them. When the bottle is removed from the stove, you screw the bronze cap over it, and there's an o-ring gasket inside as well, so the bottle is truly SECURED and safe(r) for storage.
Should be available in camping or RV stores for $5-10 a pair.

With either butane or propane stove, you may find the salt air rots parts out in 4-5 years. Still cheap enough to replace as needed.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 01-15-2012
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: Portland, OR
Posts: 666
Thanks: 1
Thanked 6 Times in 6 Posts
Rep Power: 14
olson34 is on a distinguished road
Lightbulb Do as we Say, not as we ..........

Quote:
Originally Posted by nodders View Post
I tossed out an old pressure alcohol stove today that was on the boat I purchased. I am planning to replace it for a while with a 2 burner propane camp stove I have, but the manual advises against using it in enclosed spaces due to carbon monoxide. I have seen stoves like this used on boats and wondering if there really is that much of a risk?
I did that once, about 30 years ago... for a short time until I installed a proper LPG system and new cooker.

Nowadays I would not even do that for a "short time." As others have pointed out those throwaway gas bottles do not belong inside. And then, what with having an unsafe gas system, you have abrogated your insurance coverage. While I'm usually not a fan of insurance companies, per se, in this case I agree with 'em.

If you want to save a bundle of $ over a full propane fuel system install, you could just replace the old range/cooker with a Non-Presurized Origo stove. We have been cooking and baking with one for over 15 years.

Whatever you do, be safe!


L
Faster and jackdale like this.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 01-17-2012
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Kingston Washington
Posts: 500
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 5
Waltthesalt is on a distinguished road
ABYC has safety standards. I think the explosive risk is something to consider. there are alarms available. Having said that I've seen and used cartridge stoves on amny a boat.
__________________
Walt Elliott
Kingston WA
Puget Sound
Cal-29
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 01-18-2012
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Long Island
Posts: 2,129
Thanks: 1
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 6
WanderingStar is on a distinguished road
I use and like propane. On my previous boats I used camp stoves, usually in the cockpit. On WS I have a three burner Shipmate, with oven. We've cooked and baked in warm weather and cool, hatch open or closed. It never set off the CO alarm.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #9  
Old 01-18-2012
Barquito's Avatar
Barquito
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Madison, WI
Posts: 1,907
Thanks: 0
Thanked 14 Times in 14 Posts
Rep Power: 7
Barquito is on a distinguished road
Will the CO detector alarm with high propane levels? (like from a leaking cannister). I would think undetected leaking propane would be a higher risk than CO.

Some have made some pretty slick looking camp stove propane bottle holders out of white PVC plumbing pipe. Can be clamped to the stern rail.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #10  
Old 01-18-2012
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: San Francisco Bay area
Posts: 2,123
Thanks: 1
Thanked 30 Times in 30 Posts
Rep Power: 4
MarkSF is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Barquito View Post
Will the CO detector alarm with high propane levels? (like from a leaking cannister). I would think undetected leaking propane would be a higher risk than CO.

Some have made some pretty slick looking camp stove propane bottle holders out of white PVC plumbing pipe. Can be clamped to the stern rail.
A normal CO detector won't, I'm afraid. But I did have a look at Amazon and they sell combined combustible gas / CO detectors.

Here's what I have installed :

S-1A Propane and CNG Fume Detector from Fireboy-Xintex

The problem with the camping bottles is you can't install a solenoid valve for automatic cutoff.
__________________
1984 Bristol 31.1
Alameda, California, USA

Last edited by MarkSF; 01-18-2012 at 11:35 AM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
choosing a carbon monoxide detector rmeador Gear & Maintenance 2 09-22-2010 12:49 PM
new carbon monoxide alarm closehauled14 General Discussion (sailing related) 1 12-10-2009 03:00 PM
carbon monoxide northstarjim Atomic 4 3 06-19-2008 08:52 PM
Carbon Monoxide Detector quinlanmw Gear & Maintenance 2 12-28-2003 06:34 AM
Carbon Monoxide on Board Sue & Larry Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 01-09-2002 07:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:20 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.