Halyards: Cable VS Rope - SailNet Community

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  #1  
Old 02-09-2012
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Halyards: Cable VS Rope

Hi all, I have an Islander 30 MK II. The halyards for both the mainsail and headsail are a rope and cable combo. The question I have is: Which is best a halyard that is half rope and half steel cable or one that is all rope.................??
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Rick
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Old 02-09-2012
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Nowadays all-rope is perfectly adequate.. the only real issue is whether your masthead sheaves will pass the rope.. If the rope portion of your current halyards pass into the mast over the sheave then you're likely good to go. Older wire halyards are likely to have small meathooks by now and getting rid of those is a good thing.

A good low stretch line is easier on the hands and more than up to the task.
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Old 02-10-2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Faster View Post
----

A good low stretch line is easier on the hands and more than up to the task.
Yep.
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Old 02-10-2012
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as faster mentioned, its all about the sheave-a lot of current line can probably handle more tension than other parts of the rig- in any case, if you are doing it yourself (learned the hard way) try to attach the new to the old in a manner that will bring it through the sheave smoothly, as if it gets hung up you are making a trip up the stick or calling a rigger anyhow.
an opened up paperclip with one stripe of elec tape has worked, as well as a portion of solder or a straightened hook from a clothes hanger. be wary of too much tape, it will jam....

in any case, good luck....
nothing worse than seeing two ends of connected line come spiraling down and knowing one has to go back up...
Q
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Old 02-10-2012
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I switched from all rope to galv wire in the early 70s, and would never go back to all rope. Wire has zero stretch, zero chafe, lasts over ten years, and is extremely cheap to replace.
My current galv halyard, I put on in Tonga in 2003, and it's still going strong. Never saw a meat hook on any of mine. That only happens with stainless halyards , where it is common.
I hoist the main all the way, then put a hard eye in my wire halyard, to tie the rope tail thru, about 6 inches above the winch. That way, the wire never touches the winch.
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Last edited by Brent Swain; 02-10-2012 at 05:15 PM.
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