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  #1  
Old 03-28-2012
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Pointy End's Miscellaneous Newbie Boat Questions

Well thanks to a lot of info from folks here, I've finally bought a boat. I would say the boat is in excellent condition as it was well cared for by the previous owner. As you can imagine I have lots of questions about repairs/upgrades, so I'll try and keep things organized here in this one thread in a nice list. I like lists

General Boat Info:

- 1973 Coronado 27
- Re-powered in 1985 with a Yanmar YSM8 (currently ~1500hrs)
- Also has a 1985 8hp Evinrude for redundancy (diesel runs flawlessly though)
- This boat spent ~10yrs on the hard sometime in the late '80's to '90's

Question #1: Diesel Controls

First I apologize for not knowing the name of the control type. It has two levers, one longer than the other. The long lever controls forward/reverse while the shorter one is the throttle.

My question is: should these levers operate independently? Currently I can adjust the throttle without the forward/reverse lever moving, but if switch from forward to reverse it also pulls the throttle lever back with it. Is this normal or does it need some TLC?

I have a feeling this isn't right because it could hypothetically cause you to stall the engine and come crashing into the dock with a great "thud" in front of a bunch of the club executives on your first time out. "Hypothetically" I mean

Would it be a big job to install a different type of control? I am rather partial to the single lever controls.

Question #2: Sink Drain

The sink drains through a thru-hull, but it seems to do so very slowly. If I fill the sink it takes it 10+ minutes to drain. Is this normal?

The cockpit drains also drain through the same thru-hull. I was thinking about trying to use a snake to clear any debris. Is that the best approach?

Question #3: Gland Seal

I have noticed that there is a constant drip from the gland seal; about 1 drip every 2 seconds or so. Is that normal or should I be concerned?

I'd estimate I take about 12 to 15 liters of water out of the bilge every week.

Question #4: Bilge Pump

This boat does not have a fitted bilge pump, just a few "bicycle pump" type pumps and a bucket. I would like to install one but am not sure of the best way to do this.

Someone at the marina told me to route it out the sink drain thru-hull, but I am hesitant to do that as I think it will provide too much back pressure to the pump.
I did some digging and most of the guides (and bilge pump instructions) I can find suggest expelling the water above the water line.

The biggest problem is that the bilge is not very accessible; it is basically the same as a Columbia 26 for those familiar. It is far too shallow to install anything under the panels where the keel bolts are. One of the previous owners cut a grapefruit size hole in the sole just aft of the keel bolts which allows access to the "real" bilge.

My current plan is to make this hole bigger and to some standard size so I can install a proper cover. Then install a pump like this and route a hose back to the transom. Although routing a hose past the engine could have complications.
I was originally going to get the model with the built in sensor, but I think I'd rather have the sensor somewhere higher than the pump, so it will only go off automatically in an emergency.

I guess my question is, other than general advice, how does one normally attach a pump like that? What should I be screwing it into?

Thanks!
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Old 03-28-2012
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Re: Pointy End's Miscellaneous Newbie Boat Questions

Pointy End :

Try tightening the gland seal a wee bit.

Run a snake down the sink drain. Something seems to be partlally blocking it. It should be easy to clear. Shut the sink drain through-hull and pull off the sink drain hose and make sure the line is clear.

Your bilge pump will need a hose routed higher than the water line. Don't put it in the sunk drain unless it is higher than the water line where it enters the sink drain line.
Also, if the pump is powerful, the bilge water may rise up the sink drain and come scooting up the plug-hole. I would drill a dedicated through hull, and make sure it is well above the water line. It is not a lot of work.
.

Last edited by Rockter; 03-28-2012 at 03:22 AM.
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Old 03-28-2012
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Re: Pointy End's Miscellaneous Newbie Boat Questions

The engine controls should move independently, likely something's binding in the mechanism behind the levers.. hopefully you have some access to that. Likely just a pin or a lever interfering with the other.. perhaps a slight misalignment. A single lever control would not be difficult to adapt, even try marine consignment stores like Popeyes in N Vancouver to save a few bucks.. . You should be able to use the existing cables. The panel cutout will the one determining factor.

Rockter's suggestions above make sense.. but also a simple question.. are the through hulls fully open? 10 minutes is a rather long time to drain a typically smallish sink.
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Old 03-28-2012
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Re: Pointy End's Miscellaneous Newbie Boat Questions

I'll take a crack at some of these:

#2: You say the sink drains to the cockpit drains. Does the cockpit drain quickly? If so, then the line between the sink and cockpit drains is plugged. If the cockpit drains slowly, then the thru-hull probably has leaves and junk in it. Careful rooting out with snake should be safe. And yeah, make sure the sea **** is fully open.

#3: Gland seal- It should only drip when the engine is in operation, and usually 1 drip per 12-15 seconds is appropriate. You might snug it down, but it should be replaced. The Gore-tex packing is great, and cheap. If you snug it down too much, you could burn a "collar" into the prop shaft, ruining it, so be careful. The gland seal hardware consists of the gland nut, and a thinner nut, snugged up against it. You need two pipe wrenches to bust them apart, then you snug down the gland nut about two "flats", and snug the two nuts back together.

#4: Bilge pump- Ok, so you have a shallow bilge pan. No biggie. If the pan is truly too shallow to install even a tiny Rule 500 gph pump, then get a Whale Gusher or Urchin pump. Mount it to a cockpit bulkhead and run the suction hose down into the bilge pan. Put some kind of a screen over the end of the suction hose so that you don't suck up debris that will ruin the pump.
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Old 03-29-2012
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Re: Pointy End's Miscellaneous Newbie Boat Questions

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rockter View Post
Pointy End :

Try tightening the gland seal a wee bit.
Could it be as simple as that? It would be great if that is all it takes. To the best of my recollection it had what looked like two fancy hose clamps around a rubber sleeve which was around the shaft.

I'll try tightening it a little bit and see if there is any change.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Faster View Post
The engine controls should move independently, likely something's binding in the mechanism behind the levers.. hopefully you have some access to that. Likely just a pin or a lever interfering with the other.. perhaps a slight misalignment. A single lever control would not be difficult to adapt, even try marine consignment stores like Popeyes in N Vancouver to save a few bucks.. . You should be able to use the existing cables. The panel cutout will the one determining factor.

Rockter's suggestions above make sense.. but also a simple question.. are the through hulls fully open? 10 minutes is a rather long time to drain a typically smallish sink.
OK that is good to know. Luckily I have easy access to the other side of the controls via the lazarette. The inside looks well oiled, but the side exposed to weather sure doesn't. I'll try some penetrating oil in the joints first, otherwise I'll starting taking things apart.

HAHA yes the thru-hull is open, good question though.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BubbleheadMd View Post
I'll take a crack at some of these:

#2: You say the sink drains to the cockpit drains. Does the cockpit drain quickly? If so, then the line between the sink and cockpit drains is plugged. If the cockpit drains slowly, then the thru-hull probably has leaves and junk in it. Careful rooting out with snake should be safe. And yeah, make sure the sea **** is fully open.
Well I guess it would be more accurate to say that the cockpit drains to the sink drain. There is a hose that runs from the cockpit forward to under the sink, then to the thru-hull.
I am reasonably sure that both drain slowly, but that's a good point. I will double check that.
Actually I just remembered that I have a borescope camera; I might have to get all high tech on this

Quote:
Originally Posted by BubbleheadMd View Post
#3: Gland seal- It should only drip when the engine is in operation, and usually 1 drip per 12-15 seconds is appropriate. You might snug it down, but it should be replaced. The Gore-tex packing is great, and cheap. If you snug it down too much, you could burn a "collar" into the prop shaft, ruining it, so be careful. The gland seal hardware consists of the gland nut, and a thinner nut, snugged up against it. You need two pipe wrenches to bust them apart, then you snug down the gland nut about two "flats", and snug the two nuts back together.
- I'm not sure my gland seal is setup like you describe, but I will have to take a closer look.
- What is a "flat"? Is that an unconventional unit of measurement? Like a Beard-second?

Quote:
Originally Posted by BubbleheadMd View Post
#4: Bilge pump- Ok, so you have a shallow bilge pan. No biggie. If the pan is truly too shallow to install even a tiny Rule 500 gph pump, then get a Whale Gusher or Urchin pump. Mount it to a cockpit bulkhead and run the suction hose down into the bilge pan. Put some kind of a screen over the end of the suction hose so that you don't suck up debris that will ruin the pump.
Not only is the bilge pan shallow, the ones that are accessible are well above where all the water collects.

I have seen Urchin pumps but didn't know what they were called. That could be a viable solution, and/or a non-submersible electric pump. It would be a whole lot easier to route a hose into that space than to install a pump and wiring.

I am still very reluctant to cut any holes, as I've never worked with fiberglass in this manner. I've applied it, but never drilled/cut it. Does it behave similar to wood?
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Old 03-29-2012
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Re: Pointy End's Miscellaneous Newbie Boat Questions

Stuffing Box, all you ever need to know:

Re-Packing A traditional Stuffing Box - SailboatOwners.com
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Old 03-29-2012
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Re: Pointy End's Miscellaneous Newbie Boat Questions

Stu beat me to it: Re-Packing A Traditional Stuffing Box Photo Gallery by Compass Marine at pbase.com
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Re: Pointy End's Miscellaneous Newbie Boat Questions

Pointy:

The large, rubber sleeve with big hose clamps is the "shaft log", not the gland seal. Do NOT screw with it, unless the boat is out of the water.

The shaft log is simply the rubber flex coupling and fiberglass tube that the prop shaft passes through the hull with.

The gland seal links that the other guys posted are good. When I reference a "flat", I'm referring to one "flat" side of the gland nut. The flat part that a wrench slides onto.
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Old 03-30-2012
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Re: Pointy End's Miscellaneous Newbie Boat Questions

As soon as I saw that first picture in the link it all became clear. For some reason I always assumed that you had to have the boat out of the water to repack the stuffing box, and that you had to break the shaft to do it. What a great article!

The drips I noted appeared to be coming form the shaft log, but it could be coming from the stuffing box initially and trickling down the shaft too.
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Old 03-30-2012
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Re: Pointy End's Miscellaneous Newbie Boat Questions

On the throttle/shifter controls, chances are in the back the 2 cables are coming in contact with each other probably because of some flex in the bracket that holds them. A little modification with a pair of pliers and maybe some lube should fix it right up. I think everything else seems well covered.

I also need to repack my stuffing box, I tightened it a little and it got me through last season, still not dry but livable and it is time.
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