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post #1 of 24 Old 04-11-2012 Thread Starter
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leading the running rigging back to the cockpit

I am thinking about doing this. Currently I have a winch on the mast, with a clutch for the main hal and a cleat for tying off the jib hal after winching it in. The spin hal is just cleated when in use. I have no blocks or sheaves at the base of the mast, and the halyards are all external.

Does anyone have some pics of how your boat is set up to lead these lines aft? Obviously, someone who has modified their boat would be most helpful, as I noticed many boats have sheaves incorporated at the base of their mast and I do not have this on my 25' boat.

One of my concerns is that if I lead the halyards straight down from the masthead to a block an inch or so from the base of the mast, they will flop around even more loudly at anchor than they do already.

Low budget suggestions, as always, are appreciated
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Re: leading the running rigging back to the cockpit

Happy to help.


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post #3 of 24 Old 04-11-2012
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Re: leading the running rigging back to the cockpit

One think to keep in mind is if you attach blocks to the deck the halyard load will be directly on the deck. The best solution is a plate under the mast that is turned up at the edges and has holes to attach the blocks to. The mast in the picture looks like it could be keel stepped but this is common on deck stepped masts like yours.
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Re: leading the running rigging back to the cockpit

Do you have a picture of the bottom of your mast? I though all hunters had exit blocks built into their deck stepped masts - even from that era. If that's the case half your problem is solved if you run the halyards internally.

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Re: leading the running rigging back to the cockpit

this is a base plate for turning blocks i fabricated over the winter. it cost me about 50 dollars and a few lunch hours drilling holes...i have all of my main, jib and reefing lines running aft to cockpit. someday i will add another cabin top winch a run all of them back. hope this helps some
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post #6 of 24 Old 04-11-2012
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Re: leading the running rigging back to the cockpit

This is how Bristol did the main halyard. I copied it for the boomvang, on the same side. All the hardware is backed by stainless steel plates.

If you are just doing a couple of halyards, I'd say those Schaeffer stand-up blocks are great. It would just get cluttered and expensive if you are bringing, say, 6 lines back.

I'd like to bring the remainder of the lines back eventually, and I think I'd fabricate a plate bolted to the deck around the mast to which blocks can be attached, then attach one of these organisers to the deck :

Schaefer Marine Hardware - Product Catalog


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post #7 of 24 Old 04-11-2012 Thread Starter
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Re: leading the running rigging back to the cockpit

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Do you have a picture of the bottom of your mast? I though all hunters had exit blocks built into their deck stepped masts - even from that era. If that's the case half your problem is solved if you run the halyards internally.
I'll get back with a pic, but no there are no exit blocks it is just a flush cut.
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Re: leading the running rigging back to the cockpit

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One think to keep in mind is if you attach blocks to the deck the halyard load will be directly on the deck. The best solution is a plate under the mast that is turned up at the edges and has holes to attach the blocks to. The mast in the picture looks like it could be keel stepped but this is common on deck stepped masts like yours.
I didn't think about that. Good point. But is there really enough tension on the halyards of a 25' boat to make loading the deck a problem?

What about cheek blocks mounted at the base of the mast, could they work?

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Re: leading the running rigging back to the cockpit

As has been mentioned, an under-mast base plate will be the best approach here, giving you plenty of options and places to place the turning blocks and without drilling holes in the deck!!. Generally a deck organizer in conjunction with these blocks, and the appropriate clutch/stopper(s)/winches/cleats will create an organized workable setup.

There's an unavoidable cost to all this hardware but often marine consignment stores (and even the boat yard/marina dumpster) can be goldmines.

Ron

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Re: leading the running rigging back to the cockpit

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I didn't think about that. Good point. But is there really enough tension on the halyards of a 25' boat to make loading the deck a problem?

What about cheek blocks mounted at the base of the mast, could they work?

My 31ft boat has had that arrangement for 28 years now. No sign of deformation of the deck.

A cheek block might work if the angle is right. The stand-up Schaeffer block works when the line is at a very broad range of angles.

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