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-   -   Epoxy on the prop? (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/gear-maintenance/86122-epoxy-prop.html)

newportermike 04-12-2012 03:59 PM

Epoxy on the prop?
 
Just bought a nice Pearson 303 and the surveyor has said there is a little corrosion on the prop. He has suggested that I may want to "Epoxy it". What is that? A two part solution? Do I just paint it on?:confused:

asdf38 04-12-2012 04:29 PM

Epoxy on the prop?
 
In general he's talking about some form of epoxy two part coating. Similar to a paint but probably more robust. I don't know what product exactly he might be referring too but I think people here will be able to help.

I wanted to note that the use of the word epoxy has also confused the crap out of me for a while. Prior to boating epoxy was a two part adhesive to me. But it's also a paint and a structural filler. I find it disappointing when the word is used by itself without specifying the type of product.

Even the great books like Don Casey say "fill it with epoxy" - well the 5 minute loctite epoxy at the hardware store? What are you talking about? I was aware that west marine sold west systems (not related) products by the (expensive) gallon but didn't know exactly what to make of it. Having learned a lot more and finally having bought some west 105 (general purpose resin) and 205 (hardener) I finally understand that yes, west epoxy is a sort of do it all solution for filling, bonding fairing etc.

jfitzgerald 04-12-2012 05:18 PM

Re: Epoxy on the prop?
 
Never heard of anyone painting a prop to fix corrosion and not fammiliar with prop corrosion. For what it's worth, I'd fill the voids with J&b epoxy from Home Depot. Scotch tape to hold it from dripping out while curing and sand it smooth. If the $10 pack doesn't more than fill all the voids, I'd buy a new prop. Good sailing

sailingfool 04-12-2012 08:09 PM

Re: Epoxy on the prop?
 
Use the Petit Zinc barnacle coat spray paint on your prop...its an offical SN endorsed product, well sort of.

hellosailor 04-12-2012 08:21 PM

Re: Epoxy on the prop?
 
Epoxy the prop....OK, fire up the engine and then run the *tards hand through the prop.

One does not epoxy a prop and any idiot surveyor knows that. There are maybe two specialized prop coatings on the market that some folks say will protect them from corrosion but there's nothing epoxy will do except tear itself off in use. If there are holes to be filled, craters? The prop probably needs to be replaced due to unseen galvanic damage anyway.

Epoxy the prop...Pour the epoxy in his pants, forget his hands, they'd just damage your prop blades further.

Sadly now, you've got to question everything he has said.

CalebD 04-12-2012 10:04 PM

Re: Epoxy on the prop?
 
I'm with HelloSailor on this topic. I've never heard of anyone using an epoxy product (JB Weld or whatever) for filling voids on a propeller. There is not much that is right about this suggestion. For one thing no epoxy will be equal in weight to the metal so the prop will be 'out of balance'.
The thing to do is to take the prop to a reliable prop shop and have them 'spin' it and test it for balance. They can tell you if it is out of balance. They can also add new material to your old prop if that is all it needs which will cost a lot less then a new prop. Used props will cost less of course.

Lou452 04-13-2012 12:13 AM

Re: Epoxy on the prop?
 
As a welder that gets by working the trade I would look at the post you have seen draw a line down a paper take the vote epoxy yes on one side epoxy no on the other side. I want to go on the no side. If you find the right welder he can add filler metal to SS. Alum. Brass and other metal if he knows the grade and type of alloy. Heat can distort metal the pitch and balance could be effected. A good welder with the skill level you need will fetch $29 -$ 46 and hour the shop that he works for will charge at 2x that to cover cost of the operation. My bet two hours labor? The prop will need to have a grinder before and after the weld. Then you will need a machinest or tradesman that can tell if the prop is balanced and still in pitch. I have know idea what this might cost. When ever you weld a metal you change the grain structure of it. A host of problems can happen SS. can start to have corrosion problems if not treated properly after welding or by the wrong choice of filler metal application SS has many types and grades. The same is true for brass and Aluminum. So when you finish you have a used prop that has been fixed and will need to be inspected from time to time. I do not know what a new prop for this type of boat cost but I would not think of fixing if it is under $500 Jb weld is a good epoxy I use it ! It can be better than welding for many things and may be a good fix for a limited time on your prop but I can not help but think the spots that are pitted will not keep doing this under the epoxy letting it flake off IMHO LOU452 ( X ray quality)

Lou452 04-13-2012 12:34 AM

Re: Epoxy on the prop?
 
Question how bad is the prop ? Could it be taken to a shop and just polished and balanced? I stand with hello sailor's opinion of this surveyour. He has you focused on the prop. You may need to be looking at some other issue? Then maybe his mind was not engaged on the prop or it is in better shape than we are thinking

SloopJonB 04-13-2012 03:48 AM

Re: Epoxy on the prop?
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by asdf38 (Post 857778)
In general he's talking about some form of epoxy two part coating. Similar to a paint but probably more robust. I don't know what product exactly he might be referring too but I think people here will be able to help.

I wanted to note that the use of the word epoxy has also confused the crap out of me for a while. Prior to boating epoxy was a two part adhesive to me. But it's also a paint and a structural filler. I find it disappointing when the word is used by itself without specifying the type of product.

Even the great books like Don Casey say "fill it with epoxy" - well the 5 minute loctite epoxy at the hardware store? What are you talking about? I was aware that west marine sold west systems (not related) products by the (expensive) gallon but didn't know exactly what to make of it. Having learned a lot more and finally having bought some west 105 (general purpose resin) and 205 (hardener) I finally understand that yes, west epoxy is a sort of do it all solution for filling, bonding fairing etc.

West is just a brand name that is heavily marketed and overpriced. Epoxy is epoxy is epoxy. It can be "tuned" by the selection of hardener for faster or slower curing and you can add damn near anything to it to make thickeners, fillers, fairing compounds etc. Those can also be "tuned" for specific purposes - strength, ease of sanding, waterproofing etc.

There's nothing magical about it, it's just a plastic resin, albeit probably the best and most versatile for boat uses. It's also pretty expensive. Find an industrial supplier and you'll save a bunch over retail type suppliers.

Minnewaska 04-13-2012 07:05 AM

Re: Epoxy on the prop?
 
I'm surprised no one has suggested the possibility of de-zincification. If metal is flaking off and appearing like corrosion, it could throw a blade. Have a prop shop look at it. If so, get a new one.

A poorly balanced prop can damage your cutlass bearing and possibly the transmission, engine mounts, stuffing box, etc. It wouldn't be a $5 experiment.


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