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-   -   Spar building, Baggett and Sons style... (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/gear-maintenance/86171-spar-building-baggett-sons-style.html)

CharlieCobra 04-13-2012 04:06 PM

Spar building, Baggett and Sons style...
 
As you guys know, we have a Tayana 37 in for a vigorous refit. One of the projects is a new bowsprit. My wooder founda piece of Sitka Spruce 16' X 13" X 6" that had resided in a container for over 10 years, waiting for a new home. Some $700.00 later, it had one. What follows is a little five minute video of the making of the bowsprit by hand, using hand saws and antique but fully functional tools. What's missing is Antjuan hand sanding the spindle with a piece of cut belt sander paper and the following hand sanding done by Charles today. I'll follow with finished pictures tomorrow or so. Until then, enjoy....



eherlihy 04-13-2012 09:24 PM

Re: Spar building, Baggett and Sons style...
 
I love the Talking Heads in the background!

"Take me to the river... Drop me in the water..."

Most appropriate!

SloopJonB 04-13-2012 09:28 PM

Re: Spar building, Baggett and Sons style...
 
Interesting Charlie, thanks. One question though - why the old hand tools for the basic shaping rather than power planes or even saws? I can see the drawknife for shaping the tip for the cranse iron but the rest just seems to add work & time.

Just feeling traditional or is there a "business decision" behind their selection?

deniseO30 04-13-2012 10:19 PM

Re: Spar building, Baggett and Sons style...
 
Sitka spruce, nice, I've worked with it on a small scale for canoe gunnels,

CharlieCobra 04-14-2012 10:55 AM

Re: Spar building, Baggett and Sons style...
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by SloopJonB (Post 858452)
Interesting Charlie, thanks. One question though - why the old hand tools for the basic shaping rather than power planes or even saws? I can see the drawknife for shaping the tip for the cranse iron but the rest just seems to add work & time.

Just feeling traditional or is there a "business decision" behind their selection?

It was just as fast with the traditional tools with a smaller chance of "Uh oh's". Besides, the boys need to learn these techniques. I would've done the initial cuts with my bandsaw but the piece was 1/4" too large to fit on it. Once I had to go down that "traditional" road, I decided to do the whole thing that way. I was pleasantly surprised at how fast it went. Not much more, if any, extra time to do it the old school way. The boys flat loved it....:laugher

PorFin 04-14-2012 12:17 PM

Re: Spar building, Baggett and Sons style...
 
Looks really nice, Charlie. Your boys are fortunate to have the chance to learn traditional techniques, which these days are all too rarely used. There's no better way to learn how wood behaves and responds to tools than by going old school, and this will make them better power tool operators as well.

I think Roy Underhill would be proud of you guys.

hellosailor 04-14-2012 02:19 PM

Re: Spar building, Baggett and Sons style...
 
One side of me really appreciates the craftsmanship and tradition. The other half has to wonder, how much weight could be saved ahead of the bow by using a carbon fiber (etc.) tube hidden under a good wood print applique.

SloopJonB 04-14-2012 02:38 PM

Re: Spar building, Baggett and Sons style...
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by hellosailor (Post 858602)
One side of me really appreciates the craftsmanship and tradition. The other half has to wonder, how much weight could be saved ahead of the bow by using a carbon fiber (etc.) tube hidden under a good wood print applique.

Philistine. :D

hellosailor 04-14-2012 05:41 PM

Re: Spar building, Baggett and Sons style...
 
Nah, if I was a Philistine I wouldn't waste the extra time and money on the aesthetics of a nice fake wood applique. The good stuff, you can't tell apart from real.

Now, a Philistine might just jam 150# of easily decayed dead tree where it hurts the balance of the boat the most, when maybe twenty pounds of advanced composites could do a better job longer. <VBG>

Or worse, a Philistine might take a beautifully crafted and varnished wooden boat and (UGH!) expose it to sunlight and UV and salt water, instead of keeping it nicely protected indoors.

Now, a true gentlemen, a yachtsman, would build it out of composites, handcraft the outside with genuine wood grain texture embossed into it, and have the paint shop hand paint a faux wood spar finish on it. No offense to Charlie, but cheaping out and using wood...I guess his client has a terribly limited budget.

(ttthhhhppppttttt!)

We should all have such problems.(G)


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