Seafarer 37 major repair - SailNet Community

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Old 06-27-2012
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Seafarer 37 major repair

Hi there, I am new to the forum, but will likely be a mega-poster by the time I have completed this repair. My SF37 dragged her mooring in a storm last year and suffered significant damage to the fin keel, skeg (gone), rudder, and prop shaft. The insurer offered a choice: total out, or take 85% payout and keep boat as is for repairs. Probably not the smartest decision of my life, but I took option B and am just now getting started with the project.

Phase 1 will be keel repair. The encapsulated keel consists of solid lead which was poured to fill the void from the leading edge to a point about 25" forward of the trailing edge. Though exposed and slightly scratched up, the lead is essentially undamaged. the 25" from aft of the lead to the trailing edge of the keel originally consisted of some sort of resin mixed with filler (almost looks like sawdust). It is this area that needs reconstruction... I will construct a sheet metal mold and re-pour this "core", if you want to call it that. I am not sure what to use for resin/filler. In my opinion epoxy would be overkill. The structural strength will ultimately come from the fiberglass laminate over this area and the lead portion which I plan on using epoxy for. I am leaning toward a more inexpensive polyester resin with who knows what for a filler. The better commercial fillers again seems like overkill for this... my rough calculations say that this void will take 4-5 gallons of fill. I have a bunch of the old filler in chunks as well as a bunch of the old laminate that I have ground off. What about just chopping all this material up as filler? Any other ideas? I'm not looking to cheap-out on a very important repair, but how much is too much?

I will attach a few photos to better show the damage, the area to be repaired now that I have cleaned it up a bit, and a couple of close-ups of the old filler.

Thanks for your thoughts!

Dave
Attached Thumbnails
Seafarer 37 major repair-imag0056.jpg   Seafarer 37 major repair-2012-06-23_15-53-25_711.jpg   Seafarer 37 major repair-2012-06-27_10-32-13_221.jpg   Seafarer 37 major repair-2012-06-23_15-51-22_723.jpg   Seafarer 37 major repair-2012-06-23_15-51-42_205.jpg  

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Old 06-27-2012
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Re: Seafarer 37 major repair

Good luck with the repair. I am a fellow Seafarer owner and certainly appreciate your effort at restoring this classic yacht. Your repair work is way over my head and I hope to never face a project of this magnitude.

It appears that you need the best possible advice on fiberglass repair more so than specific Seafarer input. I'll follow this thread with great interest. I also suggest that you post this on the Seafarer Yacht Group on Facebook of which I am the administrator.

Good luck and I look forward to following your repair.

James
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Old 06-27-2012
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Re: Seafarer 37 major repair

Be VERY aware of the fire risk involved in mixing large quantities of EITHER epoxy or ployester resin.

Also that polyester resin does not 'stick' very well to fully cured polyester or vinylester resin.

That is why epoxy is preferred for repair work. West System have some good ' how to' guides on their web site.
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Old 06-27-2012
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Re: Seafarer 37 major repair

Yes, the heat issue has been at the top of my concerns with this repair. The only contact will be with a sheet metal form and the lead itself, but I'm still concerned that with that thickness (about 5" tapering back to less than 1/2") there will be dangerous heat.

The other option may be to use a high density two part urethane foam. I don't think this would be recommended for below waterline use, but the only way it would ever see water would be another catastrophe...

Thanks for your ideas...
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Old 06-28-2012
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Re: Seafarer 37 major repair

Since the lead is intact, this is just "fairing". Don't think its really critical what you use. How about cement? They used to make keels of that back in the old days.
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Old 06-28-2012
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Re: Seafarer 37 major repair

Cement is not a bad idea at all... If I thought I could build a form symmetrical enough that I was confident I would not have to fair it down at all before laminating with epoxy, I might go that route... Of course that is a big IF.

I have done some more research on 2 part urethane foam. US Composites sells a 16 lb density that will cure as hard a rock, but could presumable still be worked a little after the form is removed. The price is right as well... starting to lean toward this route.
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