Heating Your Boat - Page 3 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest Forums > Gear & Maintenance
 Not a Member? 


Like Tree7Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #21  
Old 09-28-2012
Familycruisers's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Posts: 134
Thanks: 4
Thanked 3 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 3
Familycruisers is on a distinguished road
Re: Heating Your Boat

Gary's answer sounds very reasonable, and fun!
__________________
S/V Never Land
Westerly Centaur
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #22  
Old 09-29-2012
jrd22's Avatar
Courtney the Dancer
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: San Juan Islands., WA, USA
Posts: 3,787
Thanks: 3
Thanked 14 Times in 14 Posts
Rep Power: 14
jrd22 will become famous soon enough
Re: Heating Your Boat

I think your decision on which type of heat primarily depends on how much you will use it. Here in the PNW we use ours year round (almost) so it was worth the time, effort and boat bucks to install a forced air diesel furnace (Wallas, excellent, love it). If you will use it quite a bit each year it might be worth it to go with the Dickinson diesel bulkhead mount, seems like everyone that has one raves about it. If heat is not much of a concern then maybe you can get by with something as simple as the Aladdin lamp Med suggested. Someone else mentioned the engine coolant type heaters and those work great when the engine is running under load at cruise rpm, not so good when just fast idling at anchor though.
__________________
John
SV Laurie Anne

1988 Brewer 40 Pilothouse

Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #23  
Old 09-29-2012
Stu Jackson's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Posts: 717
Thanks: 0
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Rep Power: 13
Stu Jackson is on a distinguished road
Re: Heating Your Boat

I looked at the video, thanks.

We have the Brenner burner without the "lifting" feature; we just take the glass off, raise the wick and light it.

WADR to the video and the poster, that is NOT how we use our lantern. Having the heat that high will guarantee soot, which is exactly what one is trying to avoid. The claim that the glass is shaped that way to enable the large flame is not my experience.

We run the flame pretty low, can raise it a bit, but I would estimate that we run it only 30% of what the video shows. And get great light. And warmth.

Any pressurized mantle like the Coleman (and I have one, in my garage, of course! ) makes a lot of noise.

Mantles are questionable on boats - they tend to break when subjected to jolts.

The other type, not mentioned, are the smaller lamp wicks which are more like candles, rather than the larger wicks on the Brenner which are 3 1/4" wide and popped into the mantle in a circular position.

The other down side of making such large flames in a Brenner is that the inside of the glass becomes black, very soon.

As I mentioned earlier, lamp oil works just as well as kerosene.
__________________
Stu Jackson, C34, 1986, M25 engine, Rocna 10 (22#)

Last edited by Stu Jackson; 09-29-2012 at 12:27 PM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #24  
Old 09-29-2012
RocketScience's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Home Port Seattle
Posts: 155
Thanks: 1
Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Rep Power: 6
RocketScience is on a distinguished road
Re: Heating Your Boat

Go hydronic. Easier install, one tenth the bulky ductwork to run, and the side benefit of hot water while on the hook -a BIG plus if you ask the Admiral.

I went with the Webasto TLS-17. It is a 17,000 BTU unit, and good for sailboats up to 40'. Stay away from the marine heating people. You can purchase these units from heavy equipment parts suppliers (Kenworth, Peterbilt, Case, etc.) for around $850, which is the same place the eBay guys buy them and flip for $1200. Yes, you'll need a few parts from the marine heating guys, but you'll be able to put your own package together for about $1800 -NOT the $4000 the marine guys fetch.

HERE'S the relevant link to my refit page on the subject.
__________________
Rob
Wauquiez Pretorien 35
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #25  
Old 09-29-2012
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: NH
Posts: 483
Thanks: 0
Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Rep Power: 3
misfits is on a distinguished road
Re: Heating Your Boat

Quote:
Originally Posted by Familycruisers View Post
Gary's answer sounds very reasonable, and fun!
It is tempting but when you look at the out of pocket expensives I'm sure just buying a heater is cheaper in the long run.
CapnBones and Kielanders like this.
__________________
I'm not happy unless I'm complaining about something.
I'm having a very good day!
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #26  
Old 09-29-2012
Stu Jackson's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Posts: 717
Thanks: 0
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Rep Power: 13
Stu Jackson is on a distinguished road
Re: Heating Your Boat

Rob,

Great ideas for sourcing. Thanks for those great ideas.

The choices between air and hydronic are basic:

Air heat is preferred due to lack of condensation. It doesn't heat water for showering or the galley. Duct runs are problematic on SOME but not all boats. For instance, our C34 skippers have found inventive ways to get heat into the saloon without any "furniture" work.

Hydronic is great for heating, zoning by shutoff valves on the "radiators" if you choose, provides hot water, too, and is usually easier to run pipes than ductwork.

Them's the choices.

Your boat, your choice.

Quote:
Originally Posted by RocketScience View Post
Go hydronic. Easier install, one tenth the bulky ductwork to run, and the side benefit of hot water while on the hook -a BIG plus if you ask the Admiral.

I went with the Webasto TLS-17. It is a 17,000 BTU unit, and good for sailboats up to 40'. Stay away from the marine heating people. You can purchase these units from heavy equipment parts suppliers (Kenworth, Peterbilt, Case, etc.) for around $850, which is the same place the eBay guys buy them and flip for $1200. Yes, you'll need a few parts from the marine heating guys, but you'll be able to put your own package together for about $1800 -NOT the $4000 the marine guys fetch.

HERE'S the relevant link to my refit page on the subject.
__________________
Stu Jackson, C34, 1986, M25 engine, Rocna 10 (22#)
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #27  
Old 09-30-2012
BJV
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: jersey city
Posts: 91
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
bvander66 is on a distinguished road
Re: Heating Your Boat

Two good articles in the mag "Good Old Boat".
If you use any combustion source then highly recommend it is vented outside to prevent CO hazard and also reduce condenstation headaches.
We went with a bulk head diesel fireplace with a fan to circulate the air and love it. Much less maintenance than espar type heaters in our opinion.
That being said the forced air heaters are nice.
Reverse cyle is good, but wont work well once water temp is below 42 deg F.
Lots of options. Key is do a lot of research to find the solution which fits your boat your needs.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #28  
Old 09-30-2012
RocketScience's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Home Port Seattle
Posts: 155
Thanks: 1
Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Rep Power: 6
RocketScience is on a distinguished road
Re: Heating Your Boat

Quote:
Originally Posted by Stu Jackson View Post
Rob,

Great ideas for sourcing. Thanks for those great ideas.

The choices between air and hydronic are basic:

Air heat is preferred due to lack of condensation. It doesn't heat water for showering or the galley. Duct runs are problematic on SOME but not all boats. For instance, our C34 skippers have found inventive ways to get heat into the saloon without any "furniture" work.

Hydronic is great for heating, zoning by shutoff valves on the "radiators" if you choose, provides hot water, too, and is usually easier to run pipes than ductwork.

Them's the choices.

Your boat, your choice.
Stu,
Just to clarify, there is no condensation issue with hydronic heat.
__________________
Rob
Wauquiez Pretorien 35
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #29  
Old 09-30-2012
flyingriki's Avatar
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Posts: 24
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
flyingriki is on a distinguished road
Re: Heating Your Boat

THANK YOU Rob!!
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #30  
Old 10-23-2013
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: Las Vegas
Posts: 87
Thanks: 4
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 1
nighthawk is on a distinguished road
Re: Heating Your Boat

Quote:
Originally Posted by MedSailor View Post
I've been having pretty good luck using my Aladdin lantern to heat the boat recently. Aladdin lanterns, if you're not familiar, are a particular type of non-pressurized kerosene lantern that uses a mantle. In addition to being as bright as a 60W light bulb (and too bright to look directly at) they put out a LOT of heat. The manual says 2,800BTU/HR.

Just the other weekend I watched my thermostat rise by 1deg/min for 15mins after I lit my lantern. That was in the cabin of my 41ft boat with 6'10" headroom. Only the main salon was being heated, but I would guess you could heat an entire 27footer or most of a 30-35footer with one.

The lanterns are a little finicky until you get used to them, and you HAVE to use K-1 grade kerosene, but once you get the hang of them they provide lots of light and quite a bit of heat. They can also be found new for <$100.

MedSailor
Hey Med, do you have a pic of the lantern you are using? Trying to find them and there are way too many options--thinking you have one with the lox-on mantle?
__________________
Laguna Windrose 22 "Wind Angel"
Catalina 16

~~When you decide to become a sailor, you start with a full barrel of luck and an empty cup of experience. The trick is to fill your cup before the barrel runs dry.~~
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
over heating engine swillyboy General Discussion (sailing related) 14 09-04-2011 07:26 AM
Boat Heating with diesel heater Petar Gear & Maintenance 3 01-09-2011 03:07 PM
Calculating heating requirements on a boat zAr Living Aboard 12 04-01-2009 12:09 AM
heating and conditioning ustunkal Living Aboard 5 07-13-2006 03:09 PM
Heating Question pirateofcapeann Living Aboard 3 12-14-2002 02:12 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:58 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012