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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Gear & Maintenance
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  #1  
Old 03-17-2004
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nlowin is on a distinguished road
Sealing Windows

I need to re-seal 2 windows as they are leaking. The windows are recessed into the hull and then screwed staight into the foam.

I want to put the new stainless bolts all the way thru and back-nut them. My understanding is that I should
a) put a bead down around the seal
b) tighten up the nut/bolt a few threads short of tight.
c) wait until sealant cures
d) finish tighteneing bolts.

Is all that correct ?
Any more hints ?
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  #2  
Old 03-17-2004
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hamiam is on a distinguished road
Sealing Windows

i would be curious to know what kind of sealant one uses for this task.
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Old 03-17-2004
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joub is on a distinguished road
Sealing Windows

The bolt holes should be slightly larger in diameter than the bolts to allow for expansion/contaction and frame working. If the holes are too tight the windows are prone to cracking.

Jim
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Old 03-18-2004
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VIEXILE is on a distinguished road
Sealing Windows

I just yanked and replaced the big salon windows and small ports with lexan. The old frames were good (''72 boat). I bedded BOTH surfaces with clear marine silicon sealant (after wiping with acetone and allowing it to evaporate completely), but I believe, in order to get a good seal, bed it sufficiently and tighten it nearly all the way. If you don''t, the sealant could leave little avenues for water intrusion once it kicks off. Then do one last crank on the fasteners a couple of days later. I had one screw out of hundreds leak. I put a hose to the windows for about an hour and found the single drop at just one screw. Pulled the screw, filled the hole, loaded the screw, leak ended. It can be messy to get it right one time, but going with too much and tooling the excess away later is better than little leaks. The idea of bedding and tightening later works o.k. with deck hardware, but you have to be cognizant of how much spooey you''re applying and where it could leak. Think gasket. KW
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Old 03-18-2004
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Pilgram is on a distinguished road
Sealing Windows

I find 3 M 4200 fast or regular works great and can be taken apart if needed Pilgram33
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Old 03-19-2004
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VIEXILE is on a distinguished road
Sealing Windows

No to 4200 or 5200. It can''t be taken apart. I''ve seen it take out chunks of glass laminate trying to knock out through hulls.
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Old 03-19-2004
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staceyneil is on a distinguished road
Sealing Windows

You should use a structural silicone (not a regular silicone; these must come from a plastics shop) and be MATCHED to whatever plastic you are using. I.E. if you use Lexan you''d want GE''s Ultraglaze; Arcylite has it''s own correct sealant.

Structural silicones are what they use to hold the "glass" in skyscrapers. Very strong. Bomar rec''s it for rebedding their hatches. There is a thread on the Cruising World Bulletin Board about this now: http://forum.cruisingworld.com/forums/genlmesg/index.pl?read=363085

By the way, if someone used 5200 to put the ports in and you are having a hard time removing them, get a little spray can of "Anti-Bond" or "De-Bond" . It is truly miraculous at loosening 5200.

Our web site has some more details on our experience with a similar project: http://www.sailnamaste.com

Good luck!
Stacey
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Old 03-29-2004
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pehrst is on a distinguished road
Sealing Windows

I have read that self-adhesive "butyl tape" is ideal for sealing acrylic windows for boats. It has a very long shelf life and never sets entirely,thereby allows for some flex btw the boat and the windows.

Any truth to this?

Thanks
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Old 03-30-2004
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GordMay is on a distinguished road
Sealing Windows

Self-adhesive "butyl tape" is NOT ideal for sealing acrylic windows for boats.

Butyl Tape (Polyisobutylene-Isoprene) has long been used as a spacer material (gasket), draft & vapour barrier, and dielectric insulation on Automobiles, RVís and Residential Windows.
These tapes (and others like silicone, polyurethane, polysulfide, or EPDM - Ethylene Propylene Diene Monomer () are compressible plastic materials used to seal any opening or junction of two parts, such as between the glazing and its frame.
Glazing tapes are generally self-adhesive, UV resistant, and easy to apply (to clean surfaces). Residential window installers use butyl tape between the thermopane panel and the wood frame as a weather barrier.
Because it never hardens and is sticky, it is able to maintain an effective SECONDARY seal.
Most have NO bonding strength, and must be used with frames and/or fasteners.

Iíd prefer to use a UV-Resistant Urethane or Polysulfide Caulking, such as:
3Mô Auto Glass Urethane Windshield Adhesive 08696, a High viscosity, one-part, moisture curing urethane adhesive, that bonds auto replacement glass to car bodies.
-or-
Urethane Windshield Adhesive 08693, a Medium viscosity, one part moisture curing urethane adhesive designed for windshield bonding and stationary glass attachment.

Automotive Windshield Instructions (3M):
http://products3.3m.com/catalog/us/en001/auto_marine_aero/automotive_aftermarket/node_GSZCVY15DCbe/root_GST1T4S9TCgv/vroot_GSLPLPKL4Xge/gvel_WWR6DCKBSPgl/theme_us_aad_3_0/command_AbcPageHandler/output_html

HTH
Gord


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